Composers

31-40 of 88 videos of music composed by Johannes Brahms

Brahms: Symphony No. 2 / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker
Brahms: Symphony No. 2 / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker Full-length concert at www.digitalconcerthall.com Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 2 / Sir Simon Rattle, conductor · Berliner Philharmoniker / Recorded at the Berlin Philharmonie, 8 November 2008. The Berliner Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall: www.digital-concert-hall.com Subscribe to our newsletter www.digitalconcerthall.com Website of the Berliner Philharmoniker: www.berliner-philharmoniker.de
Cradle song/ Lullaby - Heavenly Lullabies (Johannes Brahms)
Cradle song/ Lullaby - Heavenly Lullabies (Johannes Brahms) Download this album here: www.kevinmayhewdigital.com Cradle song/Lullaby is from our album 'Heavenly lullabies' (July 09) Heavenly Lullabies contains a mixture of favourite classics, well known hymns and much cherished children's songs. All beautifully played as lullaby's on harp and music-box. The perfect CD for giving your little one a heavenly nights sleep. Contents: Cradle song Sing a rainbow Amazing grace First movement from 'Moonlight' Sonata Now the day is over All the pretty little horses How great is our God Tender thoughts Be still, for the presence of the Lord Hush-a-bye-baby Air from Suite No. 3 Jesus loves me Ave Maria All through the night Hush little baby When the music fades To a wild rose In Christ alone Lullaby Twinkle, twinkle little star For more information please visit www.kevinmayhew.com Thanks for listening!
Esther Ofarim - Brahms Wiegenlied / Lullaby
Esther Ofarim - Brahms Wiegenlied / Lullaby שיר הערש של יוהנס ברהמס Guten Abend , gut`Nacht Johannes Brahms - Wiegenlied / Lullaby Dieter Finnern show, Berlin 1969 ברלין 1969
Sayaka Shoji(庄司紗矢香) plays brahms violin concerto in D majo
Sayaka Shoji(庄司紗矢香) plays brahms violin concerto in D majo Sayaka Shoji (庄司紗矢香, Shōji Sayaka?, born 30 January, 1983) is a Japanese classical violinist. She is the first Japanese and youngest winner at the Paganini Competition in Genoa in 1999. She was born into an artistic family (her mother is a painter, grandmother is a poet) and spent her childhood in Siena, Italy. She studied at Hochschule für Musik Köln under Zakhar Bron and graduated in 2004. Her other teachers have included Sashko Gawrillow, Uto Ughi and Shlomo Mintz. Zubin Mehta has been her strong supporter. When Ms. Shoji auditioned for him in 2000, he immediately changed his schedule in order to make her first recording with the Israel Philharmonic possible in the following month, then invited her to perform with Bavarian State Opera and Los Angeles Philharmonic. Since then Ms.Shoji is regularly invited to many prominent orchestras, including the Israel Philharmonic, Berlin Philharmonic, London Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, St. Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra dell'Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia and WDR Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Lorin Maazel, Yuri Temirkanov and Semyon Bychkov. Sayaka Shoji records with Deutsche Grammophon and performs on the 1715 "Joachim" Stradivarius on loan from the Nippon Music Foundation.
Hungarian Dance No. 5 - Budapest Gypsy Symphony Orchestra
Hungarian Dance No. 5 - Budapest Gypsy Symphony Orchestra www.100violins.com http NO RACIST COMMENTS AGAINST ROMA PEOPLE, POLITICS OR ANYTHING BESIDES COMMENTING THE MUSIC OR YOUR COMMENTS WILL BE DELETED! "Hungarian Dance No.5" by Johannes Brahms, performed by the Budapest Gypsy Symphony Orchestra. The beautiful piece "Hungarian Dance No.5" by Johannes Brahms, performed by the Budapest Gypsy Symphony Orchestra. The wonderful traditional music of the gypsies has inspired many composers all over Europe... and now, this music is played by those gypsies it were inspired in. The Budapest Gypsy Symphony Orchestra, in Hungarian "Szaztagú Cinanyzenekar" (100 - head Gypsy Orchestra) is the world's largest Gypsy symphony orchestra. It has been founded in 1985, when Sandor Jaroka, at the time Hungary's most famous "primas" (gypsy soloist) died. All Hungarian Gypsy musicians had come to his funeral. After the ceremony they begun to play. The orchestra had been born out of that improvised moment (over a great musicians grave!).
BRAHMS: The Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 - HEIFETZ
BRAHMS: The Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 - HEIFETZ Passing Through: www.youtube.com - Friends, Please visit my Poet friend "Passing Through's" YouTube channel: www.youtube.com , and support him - Thanks :) 3. Allegro Giocoso. Ma Non Troppo Vivace Johannes Brahms' Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77 is one of the best-known of all violin concertos. It follows the standard concerto form, with three movements in the pattern quick-slow-quick: 1. Allegro non troppo 2. Adagio 3. Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace - Poco piu presto Originally, however, the work was planned in four movements like the second piano concerto. The middle movements, one of which was intended to be a scherzo, were replaced with what Brahms called a "feeble Adagio." The work was written in 1878 for the violinist and friend of Brahms, Joseph Joachim, who was the dedicatee. Brahms asked Joachim's advice on the writing of the solo violin part. The most familiar cadenzas used in the work are by Joachim, though a number of people have provided alternatives, including Leopold Auer, Max Reger, Fritz Kreisler, Jascha Heifetz, and George Enescu. A recording of the concerto released by Ruggiero Ricci has been coupled with sixteen different cadenzas. The work was premiered by Joachim in Leipzig on January 1, 1879. Various modifications were made between then and the work's publication by Fritz Simrock later in the year. Performed by: Jascha Heifetz (We appreciate Wikipaedia's contributions in the descriptions here)
Brahms piano concerto 1, mvt 1 (1of3), Ashkenazy, Giulini
Brahms piano concerto 1, mvt 1 (1of3), Ashkenazy, Giulini Johannes Brahms Piano concerto n°1 in D minor, op.15 1st mvmt (Maestoso. Poco più moderato) (1of3) Vladimir Ashkenazy Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra Carlo Maria Giulini
Brahms: Symphony No. 3 / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker
Brahms: Symphony No. 3 / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker Full-length concert at www.digitalconcerthall.com Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 3 / Sir Simon Rattle, conductor · Berliner Philharmoniker / Recorded at the Berlin Philharmonie, 14 November 2008. The Berliner Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall: www.digital-concert-hall.com Subscribe to our newsletter www.digitalconcerthall.com Website of the Berliner Philharmoniker: www.berliner-philharmoniker.de
Johannes Brahms--Hungarian Dance
Johannes Brahms--Hungarian Dance www.youtube.com www.encognitive.com The Hungarian Dances (German Ungarische Tänze) by Johannes Brahms (WoO 1), are a set of 21 lively dance tunes based mostly on Hungarian themes. Only numbers 11, 14 and 16 are entirely original compositions. They vary from about a minute to four minutes in length. They are among Brahms' most popular works, and were certainly the most profitable for him. Each dance has been arranged for a wide variety of instruments and ensembles. Brahms originally wrote the version for piano four-hands and later arranged the first 10 dances for solo piano. He wrote orchestral arrangements for No. 1, No. 3 and No. 10. Other composers, including Antonín Dvořák, orchestrated the other dances. The most famous Hungarian Dance is No. 5 in F♯ minor (G minor in the orchestral version). en.wikipedia.org
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