Composers

51-60 of 88 videos of music composed by Johannes Brahms

Brahms Piano Sonata No.3 in F Minor 1/5 Jonathan Plowright
Brahms Piano Sonata No.3 in F Minor 1/5 Jonathan Plowright Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) Piano Sonata No.3 in F Minor Op.5, played by Jonathan Plowright. I Allegro maestoso This is the first part of Brahms's piano sonata No. 3 in F minor (Op. 5) played by British virtuoso Jonathan Plowright. It was recorded live at the Wigmore Hall, London on Saturday 15th November 2008. Ed Keohane writes: "Johannes Brahms was born in Hamburg in 1833. He excelled at the piano from an early age he also played cello and the horn and was taught free of charge by Eduard Marxsen, a leading Hamburg pianist and composer, who instilled in the young Brahms a lifelong love of Bach and the Viennese Classical composers. Indeed his first solo piano recitals, in 1848 and 1849, featured works by Bach and Beethoven. "Brahms completed his third and final piano sonata in October 1853, the year that he became friends with the violinist Joseph Joachim and first met Robert and Clara Schumann. Brahms's music made a huge impression on Schumann, who wrote that each work was so different from the others that it seemed to stream from its own individual source. He also remarked how, at Brahmss hand, the piano became an orchestra of lamenting and loudly jubilant voices and his sonatas veiled symphonies. "The genial and demonic sides to Brahms's personality are both evident in this colossal five-movement work. The spectacular opening gives way to a beautiful slow movement, above which Brahms wrote a verse by the poet Sternau: Der Abend dämmert, das Mondlicht scheint Da sind ...
Brahms "Double" concert - Heifetz Feurmann - 1° Part (part1)
Brahms "Double" concert - Heifetz Feurmann - 1° Part (part1) Brahms Concerto for violin, cello & orchestra in A minor "Double", Op.102 1° PART (part1) Orchestra: Philadelphia Orchestra Director: Eugene Ormandy Violin: Jascha Heifetz Cello: Emanuel Feurmann --- 1° PART (part1) www.youtube.com 1° PART (part2) www.youtube.com 2° PART www.youtube.com 3° PART www.youtube.com --- Listen to radio stations from your browser www.toolbar-radio.com World version --- Digital Remastering of 78 RPM Records Only Classical Music Public Domain PromoClassical Copyright reserved
Classical Hallmarks - Maggio 2002 - Orchestra "V.Centurione" Genov
Classical Hallmarks - Maggio 2002 - Orchestra "V.Centurione" Genov "Classical Hallmarks": Sinfonia n°4 J.Brhams - Finlandia - Inno Alla Gioia. Una suite di brani classici eseguiti dall'Orchestra "V.Centurione" al Teatro Carlo Felice di Genova.
CMAS, EP2: Brahms Piano Quartet No. 1 in g minor, Op. 25-IV
CMAS, EP2: Brahms Piano Quartet No. 1 in g minor, Op. 25-IV Why SUBSCRIBE to The Classical Music Appreciation Show (CMAS)? Episodes start with a short lecture, then a LIVE performance of a piece or movement of classical music, with the goal to hopefully educate/inspire people who are new to classical music and entertain people who are already classical music appreciators. Heck, if you like the performance enough, you can even download the MP3 at shop.rawpp.com (search "Quartet"). And share the show with your friends too! EPISODE II Chamber Music Appreciation, Part II Don't like chamber music? Don't like Brahms? It's probably because you haven't heard the best examples of the genre, the best examples of the composer. Once you hear the Presto section of this Brahms Piano Quartet, answer those two questions again. JOHANNES BRAHMS (1833-1897) Piano Quartet No. 1 in g minor, Op. 25 (1861) IV. Rondo alla Zingarese. Presto QUARTETTO DEL PRANZO Dawn Madole, violin Andrew Lan, viola La Verne Chen, cello Ray Arthur Wang, piano Lecture written and delivered by Dawn Madole Page turning by Emil Gilliam* Saturday, January 6, 2007, 7:00 PM* Unitarian Universalist Church 505 E Charleston Rd, Palo Alto, CA To download the MP3 of this live performance of the 4th and final movement of Brahms Piano Quartet #1, visit shop.rawpp.com and search "Quartet." (Part of proceeds go to well-known causes furthering both human and animal rights.) But for now, enjoy the fourth movement and finale of Brahms' first piano quartet (in g minor, Op. 25). *The entire ...
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - III Rondo (1/2)
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - III Rondo (1/2) Director : Bernard Haitink. Concertgebouworkest Amsterdam. Rondo: Allegro non troppo (D minor → D major) Johannes Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor (Op. 15) is one of Brahms' most famous and frequently performed pieces. A concerto on nearly every major pianist's repertoire, it presents considerable technical challenges to the performer. Brahms worked on the composition for some years, as was the case with many of his works. After a prolonged gestation period, it was first performed on January 22, 1859, in Hanover, Germany, when Brahms was just 25 years old. Five days later, at Leipzig, an unenthusiastic audience hissed at the concerto, while critics savaged it, labelling it "perfectly unorthodox, banal and horrid". In a letter to his close personal friend, the renowned violinist Joseph Joachim, Brahms stated, "I am only experimenting and feeling my way", adding sadly, "all the same, the hissing was rather too much!" Brahms originally conceived the work as a sonata for two pianos. Seeking a grander and fuller sound, Brahms later orchestrated the work in an attempt to transform it into a four-movement symphony. However, he also found that unsatisfactory. Brahms ultimately decided that he had not sufficiently mastered the nuances of orchestral color to sustain a symphony, and instead relied on his skills as a pianist and composer for the piano to complete the work as a concerto. Brahms only retained the original material from the work's first movement; the remaining ...
"Hungarian Dance No. 5" on Classical Guitar.
"Hungarian Dance No. 5" on Classical Guitar. Composed by Johannes Brahms. www.elearnguitar.com
DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n. 5 (Johannes Brahms).
DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n. 5 (Johannes Brahms). DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n.5 (Johannes Brahms). David Garrett (born as David Bongartz on September 4, 1980 ) is a record breaking German/American classical violinist and recording artist. Garrett was born in Aachen, Germany to an American prima ballerina and the German lawyer and jurist, Georg Peter Bongartz. He adopted his mother's maiden name as a pseudonym. Musical education When Garrett was four years old, his father bought a violin for his older brother. The young Garrett took an interest and soon learned to play. A year later, he took part in a competition and won first prize. By the age of seven, he was playing once a week in public. He studied violin at the Lübeck Conservatoire. At the age of 12, Garrett began working with the distinguished Polish violinist Ida Haendel, often traveling to London and other European cities to meet her. He continued his studies at the Royal College of Music in London. In 2004, he graduated from the Juilliard School in New York City and was one of the first students to study there with Itzhak Perlman. Career At the age of 13, Garrett recorded two CDs, appeared on German and Dutch television, and gave a concert in the residence of the Federal Republic of Germany President, the Villa Hammerschmidt, at Dr. von Weizsäcker's personal invitation. He was offered the use of the famous Stradivarius "San Lorenzo", which is among the best instruments of the "golden period". At the age of 14, as the youngest soloist ever, Garrett signed an ...
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No 3 in B minor
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No 3 in B minor (Moscow, 27 december 1977) Emil Grigoryevich Gilels (Ukrainian: Емі́ль Григо́рович Гі́лельс, Russian: Эми́ль Григо́рьевич Ги́лельс, Emi'li Grego'rievič Gi'lelis; October 19, 1916 October 14, 1985) was a Soviet pianist, widely considered to be one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. His last name is sometimes transliterated Hilels. Gilels was born in Odessa (now part of Ukraine). He began studying the piano at the age of five[3] under Yakov Tkach, who was a student of the French pianists Raoul Pugno[4] and Alexander Villoing[3] Thus, through Tkach, Gilels had a pedagogical genealogy stretching back to Chopin, via Pugno, and to Muzio Clementi, via Villoing. Tkach was a stern disciplinarian who emphasized scales and studies. Gilels later credited this strict training for establishing the foundation of his technique.[3] Gilels made his public debut at the age of 12 in June 1929 with a well-received program of Beethoven, Scarlatti, Chopin, and Schumann.[3] In 1930, Gilels entered the Odessa Conservatory where he was coached by Berta Reingbald, whom Gilels credited as a formative influence. After graduating from the Odessa Conservatory (Ukraine) in 1935 , he moved to Moscow where he studied under the famous piano teacher Heinrich Neuhaus until 1937. A year later he was awarded first prize at the 1938 Ysaÿe International Festival in Brussels by a distinguished jury whose members included Arthur Rubinstein, Samuil Feinberg, Emil von Sauer, Ignaz Friedman, Walter ...
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No. 2 in D major
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No. 2 in D major (Moscow, 27 december 1977) Emil Grigoryevich Gilels (Ukrainian: Емі́ль Григо́рович Гі́лельс, Russian: Эми́ль Григо́рьевич Ги́лельс, Emi'li Grego'rievič Gi'lelis; October 19, 1916 October 14, 1985) was a Soviet pianist, widely considered to be one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. His last name is sometimes transliterated Hilels. Gilels was born in Odessa (now part of Ukraine). He began studying the piano at the age of five[3] under Yakov Tkach, who was a student of the French pianists Raoul Pugno[4] and Alexander Villoing[3] Thus, through Tkach, Gilels had a pedagogical genealogy stretching back to Chopin, via Pugno, and to Muzio Clementi, via Villoing. Tkach was a stern disciplinarian who emphasized scales and studies. Gilels later credited this strict training for establishing the foundation of his technique.[3] Gilels made his public debut at the age of 12 in June 1929 with a well-received program of Beethoven, Scarlatti, Chopin, and Schumann.[3] In 1930, Gilels entered the Odessa Conservatory where he was coached by Berta Reingbald, whom Gilels credited as a formative influence. After graduating from the Odessa Conservatory (Ukraine) in 1935 , he moved to Moscow where he studied under the famous piano teacher Heinrich Neuhaus until 1937. A year later he was awarded first prize at the 1938 Ysaÿe International Festival in Brussels by a distinguished jury whose members included Arthur Rubinstein, Samuil Feinberg, Emil von Sauer, Ignaz Friedman, Walter ...
Hungarian Dance Brahms Remix
Hungarian Dance Brahms Remix Awesome Remix by Adya Classic
YesNo