Composers

61-70 of 88 videos of music composed by Johannes Brahms

Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - I Maestoso (3/3)
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - I Maestoso (3/3) Director : Bernard Haitink. Concertgebouworkest Amsterdam. Johannes Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor (Op. 15) is one of Brahms' most famous and frequently performed pieces. A concerto on nearly every major pianist's repertoire, it presents considerable technical challenges to the performer. Brahms worked on the composition for some years, as was the case with many of his works. After a prolonged gestation period, it was first performed on January 22, 1859, in Hanover, Germany, when Brahms was just 25 years old. Five days later, at Leipzig, an unenthusiastic audience hissed at the concerto, while critics savaged it, labelling it "perfectly unorthodox, banal and horrid". In a letter to his close personal friend, the renowned violinist Joseph Joachim, Brahms stated, "I am only experimenting and feeling my way", adding sadly, "all the same, the hissing was rather too much!" Brahms originally conceived the work as a sonata for two pianos. Seeking a grander and fuller sound, Brahms later orchestrated the work in an attempt to transform it into a four-movement symphony. However, he also found that unsatisfactory. Brahms ultimately decided that he had not sufficiently mastered the nuances of orchestral color to sustain a symphony, and instead relied on his skills as a pianist and composer for the piano to complete the work as a concerto. Brahms only retained the original material from the work's first movement; the remaining movements were discarded and two new ones were ...
Brahms - Michelangeli, Ballade Op.10 No 4 in B major
Brahms - Michelangeli, Ballade Op.10 No 4 in B major (Lugano, 1981) Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli (January 5, 1920 June 12, 1995) was an Italian classical pianist. He has been regarded as among the most commanding and individual piano virtuosos of the 20th century, among names such as Horowitz and Richter. Along with Ferruccio Busoni, he is often considered the most important Italian pianist. Born in Brescia, Italy, he began music lessons at the age of three, initially with the violin, but quickly switched to the piano. At ten he entered the Milan Conservatory. In 1938, at age eighteen, he began his international career by entering the Ysaÿe International Festival in Brussels, Belgium, where he placed seventh (a brief account of this competition, at which Emil Gilels took first prize, is given by Arthur Rubinstein, who was one of the judges. According to Rubinstein, Michelangeli gave "an unsatisfactory performance, but already showed his impeccable technique"). A year later he earned first prize in the Geneva International Competition where he was acclaimed as "a new Liszt" by pianist Alfred Cortot, a member of the judging panel, which was presided by Ignacy Jan Paderewski. Michelangeli was known for his note-perfect performances. The music critic Harold Schonberg wrote of him: "His fingers can no more hit a wrong note or smudge a passage than a bullet can be veered off course once it has been fired...The puzzling part about Michelangeli is that in many pieces of the romantic repertoire he seems unsure of himself ...
Brahms - Michelangeli, Ballade Op.10 No. 1 in D minor
Brahms - Michelangeli, Ballade Op.10 No. 1 in D minor (Lugano, 1981) Arturo Benedetti Michelangeli (January 5, 1920 June 12, 1995) was an Italian classical pianist. He has been regarded as among the most commanding and individual piano virtuosos of the 20th century, among names such as Horowitz and Richter. Along with Ferruccio Busoni, he is often considered the most important Italian pianist. Born in Brescia, Italy, he began music lessons at the age of three, initially with the violin, but quickly switched to the piano. At ten he entered the Milan Conservatory. In 1938, at age eighteen, he began his international career by entering the Ysaÿe International Festival in Brussels, Belgium, where he placed seventh (a brief account of this competition, at which Emil Gilels took first prize, is given by Arthur Rubinstein, who was one of the judges. According to Rubinstein, Michelangeli gave "an unsatisfactory performance, but already showed his impeccable technique"). A year later he earned first prize in the Geneva International Competition where he was acclaimed as "a new Liszt" by pianist Alfred Cortot, a member of the judging panel, which was presided by Ignacy Jan Paderewski. Michelangeli was known for his note-perfect performances. The music critic Harold Schonberg wrote of him: "His fingers can no more hit a wrong note or smudge a passage than a bullet can be veered off course once it has been fired...The puzzling part about Michelangeli is that in many pieces of the romantic repertoire he seems unsure of himself ...
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - II Adagio (1/2)
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - II Adagio (1/2) Director : Bernard Haitink. Concertgebouworkest Amsterdam. Johannes Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor (Op. 15) is one of Brahms' most famous and frequently performed pieces. A concerto on nearly every major pianist's repertoire, it presents considerable technical challenges to the performer. Brahms worked on the composition for some years, as was the case with many of his works. After a prolonged gestation period, it was first performed on January 22, 1859, in Hanover, Germany, when Brahms was just 25 years old. Five days later, at Leipzig, an unenthusiastic audience hissed at the concerto, while critics savaged it, labelling it "perfectly unorthodox, banal and horrid". In a letter to his close personal friend, the renowned violinist Joseph Joachim, Brahms stated, "I am only experimenting and feeling my way", adding sadly, "all the same, the hissing was rather too much!" Brahms originally conceived the work as a sonata for two pianos. Seeking a grander and fuller sound, Brahms later orchestrated the work in an attempt to transform it into a four-movement symphony. However, he also found that unsatisfactory. Brahms ultimately decided that he had not sufficiently mastered the nuances of orchestral color to sustain a symphony, and instead relied on his skills as a pianist and composer for the piano to complete the work as a concerto. Brahms only retained the original material from the work's first movement; the remaining movements were discarded and two new ones were ...
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No 4 in B major
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No 4 in B major (Moscow, 27 december 1977) Emil Grigoryevich Gilels (Ukrainian: Емі́ль Григо́рович Гі́лельс, Russian: Эми́ль Григо́рьевич Ги́лельс, Emi'li Grego'rievič Gi'lelis; October 19, 1916 October 14, 1985) was a Soviet pianist, widely considered to be one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. His last name is sometimes transliterated Hilels. Gilels was born in Odessa (now part of Ukraine). He began studying the piano at the age of five[3] under Yakov Tkach, who was a student of the French pianists Raoul Pugno[4] and Alexander Villoing[3] Thus, through Tkach, Gilels had a pedagogical genealogy stretching back to Chopin, via Pugno, and to Muzio Clementi, via Villoing. Tkach was a stern disciplinarian who emphasized scales and studies. Gilels later credited this strict training for establishing the foundation of his technique.[3] Gilels made his public debut at the age of 12 in June 1929 with a well-received program of Beethoven, Scarlatti, Chopin, and Schumann.[3] In 1930, Gilels entered the Odessa Conservatory where he was coached by Berta Reingbald, whom Gilels credited as a formative influence. After graduating from the Odessa Conservatory (Ukraine) in 1935 , he moved to Moscow where he studied under the famous piano teacher Heinrich Neuhaus until 1937. A year later he was awarded first prize at the 1938 Ysaÿe International Festival in Brussels by a distinguished jury whose members included Arthur Rubinstein, Samuil Feinberg, Emil von Sauer, Ignaz Friedman, Walter ...
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No. 1 in D minor
Brahms - Emil Gilels, Ballade Op.10 No. 1 in D minor (Moscow, 27 december 1977) Emil Grigoryevich Gilels (Ukrainian: Емі́ль Григо́рович Гі́лельс, Russian: Эми́ль Григо́рьевич Ги́лельс, Emi'li Grego'rievič Gi'lelis; October 19, 1916 October 14, 1985) was a Soviet pianist, widely considered to be one of the greatest pianists of the 20th century. His last name is sometimes transliterated Hilels. Gilels was born in Odessa (now part of Ukraine). He began studying the piano at the age of five[3] under Yakov Tkach, who was a student of the French pianists Raoul Pugno[4] and Alexander Villoing[3] Thus, through Tkach, Gilels had a pedagogical genealogy stretching back to Chopin, via Pugno, and to Muzio Clementi, via Villoing. Tkach was a stern disciplinarian who emphasized scales and studies. Gilels later credited this strict training for establishing the foundation of his technique.[3] Gilels made his public debut at the age of 12 in June 1929 with a well-received program of Beethoven, Scarlatti, Chopin, and Schumann.[3] In 1930, Gilels entered the Odessa Conservatory where he was coached by Berta Reingbald, whom Gilels credited as a formative influence. After graduating from the Odessa Conservatory (Ukraine) in 1935 , he moved to Moscow where he studied under the famous piano teacher Heinrich Neuhaus until 1937. A year later he was awarded first prize at the 1938 Ysaÿe International Festival in Brussels by a distinguished jury whose members included Arthur Rubinstein, Samuil Feinberg, Emil von Sauer, Ignaz Friedman, Walter ...
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - I Maestoso (2/3)
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - I Maestoso (2/3) Director : Bernard Haitink. Concertgebouworkest Amsterdam. Johannes Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor (Op. 15) is one of Brahms' most famous and frequently performed pieces. A concerto on nearly every major pianist's repertoire, it presents considerable technical challenges to the performer. Brahms worked on the composition for some years, as was the case with many of his works. After a prolonged gestation period, it was first performed on January 22, 1859, in Hanover, Germany, when Brahms was just 25 years old. Five days later, at Leipzig, an unenthusiastic audience hissed at the concerto, while critics savaged it, labelling it "perfectly unorthodox, banal and horrid". In a letter to his close personal friend, the renowned violinist Joseph Joachim, Brahms stated, "I am only experimenting and feeling my way", adding sadly, "all the same, the hissing was rather too much!" Brahms originally conceived the work as a sonata for two pianos. Seeking a grander and fuller sound, Brahms later orchestrated the work in an attempt to transform it into a four-movement symphony. However, he also found that unsatisfactory. Brahms ultimately decided that he had not sufficiently mastered the nuances of orchestral color to sustain a symphony, and instead relied on his skills as a pianist and composer for the piano to complete the work as a concerto. Brahms only retained the original material from the work's first movement; the remaining movements were discarded and two new ones were ...
Brahms, Piano Quartet, C Minor, 3rd mvt, Andante, opus 60 (animation
Brahms, Piano Quartet, C Minor, 3rd mvt, Andante, opus 60 (animation One of Brahms' most beautiful slow movements, for string trio with piano. FAQ Q: Who is playing this piece? A: Sorry, I don't know. I licensed this recording from Keith Salmon, of Royalty Free Classical Music (dot org). Q: Who is this Brahms person? A: You can read about him here en.wikipedia.org Q: If it's a piano quartet, why do I hear violins? A: A piece of music for a solo instrument accompanied by a piano is most often called a sonata (violin sonata, flute sonata, etc.), but when a string trio (violin, viola, violoncello) is joined by a piano, it's called a piano quartet. A piece for four pianists is usually referred to as "eight-hand piano music." Go figure. Q: Something sounds wrong in the second beat of the measure that starts at 5:26. A: Yes; the violist plays a D-natural on the second beat; it should be a D-sharp. Q: This is really beautiful; what other pieces are like this? A: I don't know of another piece that's this beautiful in quite this way, but the other piano trios, quartets and quintets of Schubert, Schumann and Brahms are really good, so that's a good place to start. Q: Isthere a way I could make the bar-graph scores myself? A: The Music Animation Machine MIDI file player will generate this display; you can get the (Windows) software here: www.musanim.com There are lots of places on the web where you can get MIDI files; I usually go to the Classical Archives site first: www.classicalarchives.com Q: Could you do a MAM video of ______? A: Please read ...
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - I Maestoso (1/3)
Rubinstein - Brahms, Piano Concerto No.1 - I Maestoso (1/3) Director : Bernard Haitink. Concertgebouworkest Amsterdam. Johannes Brahms's Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor (Op. 15) is one of Brahms' most famous and frequently performed pieces. A concerto on nearly every major pianist's repertoire, it presents considerable technical challenges to the performer. Brahms worked on the composition for some years, as was the case with many of his works. After a prolonged gestation period, it was first performed on January 22, 1859, in Hanover, Germany, when Brahms was just 25 years old. Five days later, at Leipzig, an unenthusiastic audience hissed at the concerto, while critics savaged it, labelling it "perfectly unorthodox, banal and horrid". In a letter to his close personal friend, the renowned violinist Joseph Joachim, Brahms stated, "I am only experimenting and feeling my way", adding sadly, "all the same, the hissing was rather too much!" Brahms originally conceived the work as a sonata for two pianos. Seeking a grander and fuller sound, Brahms later orchestrated the work in an attempt to transform it into a four-movement symphony. However, he also found that unsatisfactory. Brahms ultimately decided that he had not sufficiently mastered the nuances of orchestral color to sustain a symphony, and instead relied on his skills as a pianist and composer for the piano to complete the work as a concerto. Brahms only retained the original material from the work's first movement; the remaining movements were discarded and two new ones were ...
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