Composers

11-20 of 30 videos of music composed by Gaetano Donizetti

Gaetano Donizetti - Il campanello di notte (1836) - Cavatina for Ann
Gaetano Donizetti - Il campanello di notte (1836) - Cavatina for Ann "Il campanello di notte" (or "The Night Bell"), one of Donizetti's smaller, least known works, is a part of a series of one act operas that the composer produced on the peak of his popularity. The opera was composed for Naples, about nine months after the great success of "Lucia di Lammermoor" at il Teatro San Carlo, and presented at il Teatro Nuovo on the 6th of June, 1836. The farse, in three words, light, characterful, delightful, is proof of Donizetti's prowess in the comical genre. The narrative is simple: Don Annibale Pistacchio, a pharmacist from Naples, is celebrating his future marriage with Serafina, a beautiful girl, younger than her groom by quite a number of years. Annibale, however, is nervous about leaving his bride the next morning to travel to Rome, so he is in a hurry to consummate his marriage with the girl. He is confronted by Enrico, cousin and Serafina's former lover in a series of ridiculous night calls (which Annibale is forced to answer by law) that keep Annibale from even entering the bridal chambers and, finally, leaving Serafina to Enrico, the man she truly loves. All this is presented in some of Donizetti's most humorous numbers, one of which is presented here. The piece is actually Annibale's joyous cavatina, one of my favorites among all of Donizetti's buffo pieces, as he celebrates his future happiness with Serafina. The aria is divided into two parts: a parlando cantabile, set to an ABA structure, as the bass praises the beauty and the ...
Szentkiraly Boda Timeea - Convien Partir by Gaetano Donizetti - Muza
Szentkiraly Boda Timeea - Convien Partir by Gaetano Donizetti - Muza Convien partir La figlia del reggimento Gaetano Donizetti soprano: Szentkiraly Boda Timeea pianist: Ciprian Ghiurco
Gaetano Donizetti - Don Pasquale - "Vediamo: alla modista" (Lucia
Gaetano Donizetti - Don Pasquale - "Vediamo: alla modista" (Lucia Recently I acquired another two recordings of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale" and "L'elisir d'amore" into my collection. Both these pieces are well-known and don't need any kind of introduction. Saying that the works have received numerous recordings would be a very big understatement: according to one of the best sites for discographies, operadis-opera-discography.org.uk, there are, respectively, 62 and 77 recordings of the operas. I have several recordings of the operas with which I am pretty happy: Abbado's recording of "Don Pasquale" with Allen, Mei, Lopardo and Scimone's "L'elisir" with Carreras, Ricciarelli, Trimarchi and Nucci would have to be the highlights... At least, they were before I bought the two new ones. Heinz Wallberg was a German conductor. He became principal music director in Augsburg in 1954, and in Bremen in 1955, concluding in both posts in 1960. From 1964 to 1975, Wallberg was principal conductor of the Tonkünstler Orchestra, Vienna. He held the same post with the Munich Radio Orchestra from 1975 to 1982, and with the Essen Philharmonic from 1975 to 1991. From what I managed to read on him, most of his recordings are set firmly in Wagnerian operas and verisimo. And yet, in 1979 and in 1984, with the help of Bavaria Radio and BMG Music, he recorded Donizetti's comic masterpieces (in the order already given at the beginning)... One would imagine that the recordings are bound to be heavy, over-emphasized affairs... They aren't even close to these ...
Beniamino Gigli sings Donizetti - Una furtiva lagrima (1953)
Beniamino Gigli sings Donizetti - Una furtiva lagrima (1953) In this 1953 recording, Italian tenor Beniamino Gigli sings the famous aria "Una furtiva lagrima" from the opera L'elisir d'amore (The Elixir of Love) by Gaetano Donizetti (1797-1848). Conductor: Nino Sanzogno Orchestra di Milano della RAI
Don Pasquale - Fresca uscita di convento
Don Pasquale - Fresca uscita di convento Don Pasquale Don Pasquale: Ferruccio Furlanetto Dottor Malatesta: Lucio Gallo Norina: Nuccia Focile Ernesto: Gregory Kunde Conductor: Riccardo Muti Composed by Gaetano Donizetti. Teatro alla Scala, Milan. 1994.
Anna Netrebko in Anna Bolena 2011 Vienna State Opera
Anna Netrebko in Anna Bolena 2011 Vienna State Opera Gaetano Donizetti/1797 - 1848 Anna Netrebko /Anna Bolena Elina Garanca /Giovanna Seymour Ildebrando D'Arcangelo /Enrico VIII. Francesco Meli /Lord Riccardo Percy Elisabeth Kulman /Smeton Peter Jelosits /Sir Hervey Dan Paul Dumitrescu /Lord Rochefort Orchester der Wiener Staatsoper Chor der Wiener Staatsoper ATTO SECONDO Scena quinta Escono i servi di Anna dalla prigione ov'è rinchiusa. CORO (TUTTI) Chi può vederla a ciglio asciutto in tanto affanno, in tanto lutto, e non sentirsi spezzare il cor? CORO (PARTE) Or muta e immobile qual freddo sasso; or lungo e rapido studiando il passo; or trista or pallida, com'ombra, in viso; or componendosi ad un sorriso: in tanti mutasi diversi aspetti, quanti in lei sorgono pensieri e affetti nel suo delirio, nel suo dolor. Scena sesta Anna dalla sua prigione. Si presenta in abito negletto, col capo scoperto si avanza lentamente, assorta in profondi pensieri. Silenzio universale. servi la circondano vivamente commossi. Ella l'osserva attentamente sembra rasserenarsi. ANNA Piangete voi? donde tal pianto?... È questo giorno di nozze. Il Re mi aspetta... è acceso infiorato l'altar. Datemi tosto il mio candido ammanto; il crin m'ornate del mio serto di rose... che Percy non lo sappia... il Re l'impose. CORO Oh! memoria funesta! ANNA Oh! Chi si duole? CORO Oh! memoria funesta! ANNA Oh! chi si duole? Chi parlò di Percy?... Ch'io non lo vegga. Ch'io m'asconda a' suoi sguardi. È vano. Ei viene... ei mi accusa... ei mi grida. Oh! mi perdona ...
Eterno Amore e Fe - M. del Rocío Giordano - Susana Cardonnet
Eterno Amore e Fe - M. del Rocío Giordano - Susana Cardonnet Eterno Amore e Fe Canción de Cámara de Gaetano Donizetti María del Rocío Giordano (soprano) Maestra Susana Cardonnet (piano) Biblioteca Café - Mayo 2008
Gaetano Donizetti - L'elisir d'amore - "Della crudele Isolde" (L
Gaetano Donizetti - L'elisir d'amore - "Della crudele Isolde" (L Recently I acquired another two recordings of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale" and "L'elisir d'amore" into my collection. Both these pieces are well-known and don't need any kind of introduction. Saying that the works have received numerous recordings would be a very big understatement: according to one of the best sites for discographies, operadis-opera-discography.org.uk, there are, respectively, 62 and 77 recordings of the operas. I have several recordings of the operas with which I am pretty happy: Abbado's recording of "Don Pasquale" with Allen, Mei, Lopardo and Scimone's "L'elisir" with Carreras, Ricciarelli, Trimarchi and Nucci would have to be the highlights... At least, they were before I bought the two new ones. Heinz Wallberg was a German conductor. He became principal music director in Augsburg in 1954, and in Bremen in 1955, concluding in both posts in 1960. From 1964 to 1975, Wallberg was principal conductor of the Tonkünstler Orchestra, Vienna. He held the same post with the Munich Radio Orchestra from 1975 to 1982, and with the Essen Philharmonic from 1975 to 1991. From what I managed to read on him, most of his recordings are set firmly in Wagnerian operas and verisimo. And yet, in 1979 and in 1984, with the help of Bavaria Radio and BMG Music, he recorded Donizetti's comic masterpieces (in the order already given at the beginning)... One would imagine that the recordings are bound to be heavy, over-emphasized affairs... They aren't even close to these ...
Gaetano Donizetti - L'elisir d'amore - "Signor sergente" (Peter
Gaetano Donizetti - L'elisir d'amore - "Signor sergente" (Peter The finale proper begins with Gianetta's entrance with a letter from Belcore's commander (talk about dramatical messenger; plus, the music is brilliantly "runny" in the strings). Belcore and his men are to leave the very next morning. But that doesn't really stop Adina who (and that's the second part of the all-important-event) announces that she will marry Belcore immediately which causes Nemorino great distress (plus, the wine has gotten out of his system a bit). The next section is the iconic "suspension-over-time": Nemorino's gentle, sighing, elegant line is contrasted with Belcore's and Adina's laughing, mocking short phrases (the soprano only joins the tenor's line for her two last couplets as she laments the loss of all possible hope of marrying Nemorino). Finally, time returns as all except Nemorino (and, secretly, Adina) rejoice at the news of the upcoming news; Nemorino is pushed aside with only his cries of "doctor! doctor!" audible. And that's the Act One Finale :)! Peter Dvorsky, Lucia Popp, Bernd Weikl are joined by the Gianetta of Judith Hobarth. Hope you enjoyed it :)! The next piece, Adina's big aria is coming soon.
Gaetano Donizetti - Don Pasquale - "E il dottore non si vede" (Luc
Gaetano Donizetti - Don Pasquale - "E il dottore non si vede" (Luc Recently I acquired another two recordings of Donizetti's "Don Pasquale" and "L'elisir d'amore" into my collection. Both these pieces are well-known and don't need any kind of introduction. Saying that the works have received numerous recordings would be a very big understatement: according to one of the best sites for discographies, operadis-opera-discography.org.uk, there are, respectively, 62 and 77 recordings of the operas. I have several recordings of the operas with which I am pretty happy: Abbado's recording of "Don Pasquale" with Allen, Mei, Lopardo and Scimone's "L'elisir" with Carreras, Ricciarelli, Trimarchi and Nucci would have to be the highlights... At least, they were before I bought the two new ones. Heinz Wallberg was a German conductor. He became principal music director in Augsburg in 1954, and in Bremen in 1955, concluding in both posts in 1960. From 1964 to 1975, Wallberg was principal conductor of the Tonkünstler Orchestra, Vienna. He held the same post with the Munich Radio Orchestra from 1975 to 1982, and with the Essen Philharmonic from 1975 to 1991. From what I managed to read on him, most of his recordings are set firmly in Wagnerian operas and verisimo. And yet, in 1979 and in 1984, with the help of Bavaria Radio and BMG Music, he recorded Donizetti's comic masterpieces (in the order already given at the beginning)... One would imagine that the recordings are bound to be heavy, over-emphasized affairs... They aren't even close to these ...
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