Composers

41-50 of 54 videos of music composed by Antonín Dvořák

Dvorak - Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" - II (part 1)
Dvorak - Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" - II (part 1) New World Symphony by Antonin Dvorak. Wiener Philharmoniker. Herbert von Karajan, conductor.
Dvorak's Humoresque - Rachel Barton Pine
Dvorak's Humoresque - Rachel Barton Pine Rachel Barton Pine introduces and performs Humoresque by Antonin Dvorak (arranged by Fritz Kreisler, revised and adapted by Maud Powell) with pianist Matthew Hagle, April 27, 2007 Rachel's 2007 CD "American Virtuosa: Tribute to Maud Powell" features this piece, other arrangements by Maud Powell, and works dedicated to her by American composers.
Antonin DVORAK: "The New World" Symphony
Antonin DVORAK: "The New World" Symphony Passing Through: www.youtube.com - Friends, Please visit my Poet friend "Passing Through's" YouTube channel: www.youtube.com , and support him - Thanks :) 3. Scherzo: Molto Vivace -- Poco sostenuto The Symphony No. 9, in E Minor "From the New World" (Op. 95), popularly known as the New World Symphony, was composed by Antonín Dvořák in 1893 during his visit to the United States from 1892 to 1895. It is by far his most popular symphony, and one of the most popular symphonies in the modern repertory. It is in four movements: 1. Adagio -- Allegro molto 2. Largo 3. Scherzo: Molto Vivace -- Poco sostenuto 4. Allegro con fuoco Dvorak stated that the third movement scherzo was "suggested by the scene at the feast in Hiawatha where the Indians dance". "The Song of Hiawatha" is an 1855 epic poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow based on the legends of the Ojibway Indians. (We appreciate Wikipaedia's contributions in the descriptions here)
Dvorak - Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" - 3rd movement
Dvorak - Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" - 3rd movement New World Symphony by Antonin Dvorak. Wiener Philharmoniker. Herbert von Karajan, conductor.
Dvorak Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" 4th movement
Dvorak Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" 4th movement Antonin Dvorak, a nationalistic composer from Czechoslovakia, was lured to New York in 1892 to the newly founded National Conservatory of Music. He was enthralled by what he saw as our nationalistic music. He infused the nature of Negro spirituals with the spirit of Native American Indian tunes into his work. His Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" was composed during his first year in America and has become one of the most popular orchestral pieces in the classical Kamuela Philharmonic January 6, 2008 at the Kahilu Theatre in Waimea Conductor and music director Madeline Schatz. Editor: Paul Csige
Ah mes amis
Ah mes amis Robert Nagy - Concert a Bucarest Gaetano Donizetti - La Fille du Regiment.Baryton: Radu Pintilie.
Dvorak Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" 2nd movement
Dvorak Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" 2nd movement Antonin Dvorak, a nationalistic composer from Czechoslovakia, was lured to New York in 1892 to the newly founded National Conservatory of Music. He was enthralled by what he saw as our nationalistic music. He infused the nature of Negro spirituals with the spirit of Native American Indian tunes into his work. His Symphony No. 9 "From the New World" was composed during his first year in America and has become one of the most popular orchestral pieces in the classical Kamuela Philharmonic. January 6, 2008 at the Kahilu Theatre in Waimea Conductor and music director Madeline Schatz. Editor: Paul Csige
Antonín Dvořák: Stabat Mater II (Talich cond.)
Antonín Dvořák: Stabat Mater II (Talich cond.) Antonín Dvořák (1841-1904) Stabat Mater, Cantata for Soloists, Choir and Orchestra op. 58 (B 71, 1876-77) II. Quartetto. Andante sostenuto (Quis est homo, qui non fleret) Václav Talich Václav Talich (28 May 1883 16 March 1961) began his career as a talented violinistfirst in a student orchestra in Klatovy, then from 1897 to 1903 at the conservatory in Prague where he studied with the celebrated Otakar Ševčík. Finally he served as concert master of the Berlin Philharmonic, where a fateful turning point occurred. That orchestras chief conductor, Arthur Nikisch, so fascinated the twenty-one-year-old Talich that he decided to become a conductor himself. Then came fifteen years of wandering and gathering experience. In 1905 he worked in Odessa for a little less than a year, before moving to Tbilisi where he conducted for the very first time. For two years he tried to establish himself as a choirmaster and conductor in Prague, but then from 1908 to 1912 he served in Ljubljana as chief conductor of the Slovenian Philharmonic. Before the First World War broke out he was able to study in Leipzig with Max Reger and Arthur Nikisch, to spend several months studying in Milan, and to lead the opera company in Plzeň starting in 1912. From 1915 to 1918 he occasionally taught violin, performed as a violist with the famous Czech Quartet, studied scores, and in his free moments educated himselffor example by reading classical literature in Greek and Latin. The door to the Czech Philharmonic ...
Ragtime Piano Player- Humoresque- A. Dvorak- Ragtime Style
Ragtime Piano Player- Humoresque- A. Dvorak- Ragtime Style This is me playing a ragtime piano version of the classic piece Humoresque by Antonin Dvorak. Hope you enjoy it. If you like ragtime and jazz piano please see my other videos too. Mark Chang- solo piano Recorded Feb. 15, 2008 in Davis, CA.
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