Composers

31-40 of 76 videos of music composed by Franz Joseph Haydn

Haydn - "Kaiser" Quartet in C Major - Mov. 1/4
Haydn - "Kaiser" Quartet in C Major - Mov. 1/4 FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN (1732-1809) String Quartet in C Major Op. 76 No. 3Hob III:77 "Kaiser" 1. Allegro Performed by Quator Mosaiques *This quartet boasts the nickname "Kaiser" or "Emperor", because in the second movement, Haydn quotes the melody from Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser ("God Save Emperor Francis"), an anthem he wrote for Emperor Francis II. This same melody is known to modern listeners for its later use in the German national anthem, Deutschlandlied.
Bonney, Howells, Johnson & Roberts - Haydn "Nelson Mass" Part lll
Bonney, Howells, Johnson & Roberts - Haydn "Nelson Mass" Part lll J. Haydn "Nelson Mass" Part lll Gloria ll Barbara Bonney - Soprano Anne Howells - Mezzo Soprano Anthony R. Johnson - Tenor Stephen Roberts - Baritone Richard Hickox - Conductor City of London Sinfonia London Symphony Chorus Illustrations - St Paul's Cathedral, London - St Paul's Cathedral - information part Ill 'Old St Paul's' Main article: Old St Paul's Cathedral Old St Paul's prior to 1561, with intact spire The fourth St Paul's, known when architectural history arose in the 19th century as Old St Paul's, was begun by the Normans after the 1087 fire. Work took over 200 years, and a great deal was lost in a fire in 1136. The roof was once more built of wood, which was ultimately to doom the building. The church was consecrated in 1240, but a change of heart led to the commencement of an enlargement programme in 1256. When this 'New Work' was completed in 1314 — the cathedral had been consecrated in 1300 — it was the third-longest church in Europe. Excavations by Francis Penrose in 1878 showed it was 585 feet (178 m) long and 100 feet (30 m) wide (290 feet or 87 m across the transepts and crossing), and had one of Europe's tallest spires, at some 489 feet (149 m). By the 16th century the building was decaying. Under Henry VIII and Edward VI, the Dissolution of the Monasteries and Chantries Acts led to the destruction of interior ornamentation and the cloisters, charnels, crypts, chapels, shrines, chantries and other buildings in St Paul's Churchyard. Many of these former ...
Haydn Trumpet Concerto in Eb 2nd Mvmt.
Haydn Trumpet Concerto in Eb 2nd Mvmt. I love this song and truthfully I have never performed it. I found a midi file for it back when I was in middle school and the band director gave me a copy of the whole concerto but it just kind of drifted away for me. I've since performed the 1st and 3rd mvmts but wanted to play the 2nd so here it is for youtube!
M.Rostropovich - Haydn Concerto No.1 C Major (1)
M.Rostropovich - Haydn Concerto No.1 C Major (1) J.Haydn - Cello Concerto No.1 in C major 1st Mov Mstislav Rostropovich (1927-2007) Academy of St Martin in the Fields *Note: If you liked this video, please support the artist by purchasing his/her products. Thank you.*
Glorious Things Of Thee Are Spoken - Franz Haydn {Das Lied der Deuts
Glorious Things Of Thee Are Spoken - Franz Haydn {Das Lied der Deuts Glorious Things Of Thee Are Spoken - Hymn Tune: Austrian Hymn by Franz Joseph Haydn { Das Lied der Deutschen } I start in the Key of E Flat and raise it to the Key of F Major for the last 3 verses with a nice Harmonization by Gordon Young, full Tutti with a Ritard for the last 4 measures. If you are using your Headphones like I suggest when listening to my video's, you will be amazed at the sound ! " Glorious things are Spoken of Thee, O City of God..." Psalms 87:3 Thank you for visiting my video's and for subscribing, more nice Hymns are coming. ( Danke für das Aufpassen ) LANCE † German National Anthem .
Haydn - Symphony No. 6 "Le Matin" - Mov. 1/4
Haydn - Symphony No. 6 "Le Matin" - Mov. 1/4 FRANZ JOSEPH HAYDN (1732-1809) Symphony No. 6 for flute, two oboes, bassoon, 2 horns, violin concertante, cello concertante, strings, and double bass in D major "Le Matin" (The Morning) Hob 1:6 1. Adagio - Allegro Performed by the Freiburger Barockorchester *Haydn wrote this, his first symphonic work for his new employer Prince Nikolaus Eszterházy, in the spring of 1761, shortly after joining the court. The Eszterházys maintained in permanent residence an excellent chamber orchestra and with his first contribution for it in the symphonic genre, Haydn fully exploited the talents of the players. In this, Haydn was consciously drawing on the familiar tradition of the concerto grosso, exemplified by the works of Antonio Vivaldi, Giuseppe Tartini, and Tomaso Albinoni then much in vogue at courts across Europe. Nikolaus Eszterházy had a fondness for programme music of this kind. Amongst the scores owned by the court musical establishment were Vivaldi's "Four Seasons"; and in 1748 the prince's Kapellmeister Gregor Joseph Werner had composed a "Musikalischer Instrumental-Kalender' on all twelve months.
Haydn- Insanae Et Vanae Curae (St. John's College Choir.)
Haydn- Insanae Et Vanae Curae (St. John's College Choir.) The Choir of St. John's College Cambridge, performing Joseph Haydn's Insanae et vanae curae.
Sifei Wen, cello, J. Haydn, Concerto in C major, I. Moderato
Sifei Wen, cello, J. Haydn, Concerto in C major, I. Moderato Franz Joseph Haydn, Concerto for cello and piano in C major, Hob. VII, No. 1, I. Moderato, Sifei Wen, violoncello, and Valeria Morgovskaya, Piano, Live in Concert, August 25, 2007, University of Southern California, United University Church, 7:00 p. m
Quartet No.2 in D minor, Opus 76 "Quinten" by Joseph Haydn
Quartet No.2 in D minor, Opus 76 "Quinten" by Joseph Haydn Seraphina performs Quartet No.2 in D major, Opus 76 "Quinten" by Joseph Haydn April 22, 2007 Ethical Society Building, Philadelphia
Haydn Symphony No 94 G major 'Surprise' 'Mit dem Paukenschlag' M
Haydn Symphony No 94 G major 'Surprise' 'Mit dem Paukenschlag' M The Symphony No. 94 in G major (Hoboken 1/94) is the second of the twelve so-called London symphonies (numbers 93-104) written by Joseph Haydn. It is usually called by its nickname, the Surprise Symphony, although in German it is more often referred to as the Symphony "mit dem Paukenschlag" ("with the kettledrum stroke"). Haydn wrote the symphony in 1791 in London for a concert series he gave during the first of his visits to England (1791--1792). The premiere took place at the Hanover Square Rooms in London on March 23, 1792, with Haydn leading the orchestra seated at a fortepiano. The Surprise Symphony is scored for a Classical-era orchestra consisting of two each of flutes, oboes, bassoons, horns, trumpets, plus timpani, and the usual string section consisting of first and second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses. Nickname (the Surprise) Haydn's music contains many jokes, and the "Surprise" Symphony includes probably the most famous of all: a sudden fortissimo chord at the end of an otherwise piano opening theme in the variation-form second movement. The music then returns to its original quiet dynamic, as if nothing had happened, and the ensuing variations do not repeat the joke. In Haydn's old age, George August Griesinger, his biographer, asked whether he wrote this "surprise" to awaken the audience. Haydn replied: No, but I was interested in surprising the public with something new, and in making a brilliant debut, so that my student Pleyel, who was at ...
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