Composers

21-30 of 36 videos of music composed by Gustav Mahler

Concertgebouw Orchestra Mahler Symphony No.1 Mariss Jansons
Concertgebouw Orchestra Mahler Symphony No.1 Mariss Jansons Gustav Mahler Symphony No.1, 2nd movement, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Mariss Jansons, Vesko Eschkenazy concertmaster
Gustav Mahler - "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen" (Rückert) -
Gustav Mahler - "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen" (Rückert) - During the summers of 1901 and 1902, Gustav Mahler set to music five poems by the German Romantic poet Friedrich Rückert. The third of these, "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen", portrays a world-weary artist who exists in our everyday world, but who actually lives his life in another, more ethereal plane reserved for great artists. Mahler, much maligned as composer during his lifetime, identified strongly with the poem, saying that it expressed his very self. In fact, he felt so strongly about this song that he reused much of the music in the famous Adagietto of his Fifth Symphony, which he composed during the summer of 1902. The orchestral song begins with a mournful melody played by solo English horn. This melody is then restated and extended by the singer during the first stanza, which speaks of the artists isolation in a world that already thinks him dead. The tempo increases slightly for the second stanza, during which the artist reflects that he does not really care what the world thinks. The third stanza is remarkably peaceful as the artist describes the other world in which he resides: I live alone in my heaven, in my love, in my song. The gentle consonant-dissonant alternation of the violins and English horn in the coda seems to portray the artist staring beyond the horizon into his musical paradise. Many consider "Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen", as Mahlers greatest song, one of his most profound and moving works and was of immense personal significance ...
Gustav Mahler - Symphony No.5 - I, Trauermarsch: In gemessenem Schri
Gustav Mahler - Symphony No.5 - I, Trauermarsch: In gemessenem Schri Symphony No.5, first movement "Trauermarsch: In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt". Author: Gustav Mahler (1860-1911). The Symphony No. 5 by Gustav Mahler was composed in 1901 and 1902, mostly during the summer months at Mahler's cottage at Maiernigg. Among its most distinctive features are the funereal trumpet solo that opens the work and the frequently performed Adagietto. The musical canvas and emotional scope of the work, which lasts over an hour, are huge. After its premiere, Mahler is reported to have said, "Nobody understood it. I wish I could conduct the first performance fifty years after my death." The work is in five movements: 1. Trauermarsch (Funeral March) (C-sharp minor). 2. Stürmisch bewegt, mit größter Vehemenz (Moving stormily, with the greatest vehemence) (A minor). 3. Scherzo (D major). 4. Adagietto (F major). 5. Rondo-Finale (D major). The first two movements constitute Part I of the symphony (as designated by Mahler in the score), the long Scherzo constitutes Part II, and the last two movements constitute Part III. The piece is generally regarded as Mahler's most conventional symphony up to that point, but from such an unconventional composer it still had many peculiarities. It almost has a four movement structure, as the first two can easily be viewed as essentially a whole. The symphony also ends with a Rondo, in the classical style. Some peculiarities are the funeral march that opens the piece (starting with a rhythmic figure that ...
Mahler: Symphony No. 5: Part I: Mov. 1 - Part 1 of 2
Mahler: Symphony No. 5: Part I: Mov. 1 - Part 1 of 2 Symphony No. 5 in C-sharp minor: Part I: Mov. 1, "Trauermarsch. In gemessenem Schritt. Streng. Wie ein Kondukt" Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) Conducted by Leonard Bernstein Roland Berger, Horn Vienna Philharmonic
Maybe the most beautiful music ever
Maybe the most beautiful music ever The sound level is too low, turn your volume up! Gustav Mahler: The last 10 minutes from the Finale of his 10th Symphony. That symphony is unfinished, only a torso. Written in 1910/ 1911. The Mahler-experts Deryck Cook and Berthold Goldschmidt created this performing version of that torso, you're listening here. Performed by the Berliner Sinfonieorchester, the conductor is Kurt Sanderling. For me the whole symphony, especially the Finale, is the most beautiful music ever known. That last 10 minutes start after a shocking dissonant climax of bitterness, when the strings and horns turn the hard emotions down again.
Gustav Mahler - 5th Symphony conducted by Maazel. 4. Adagietto
Gustav Mahler - 5th Symphony conducted by Maazel. 4. Adagietto Lorin Maazel conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker), playing the 5th Symphony of Mahler. 4: Adagietto. Sehr langsam Recorded 1983
Mahler: Symphony No. 7 / Haitink · Berliner Philharmoniker
Mahler: Symphony No. 7 / Haitink · Berliner Philharmoniker Full-length concert at www.digitalconcerthall.com Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 7 / Bernard Haitink, conductor · Berliner Philharmoniker / Recorded at the Berlin Philharmonie, 17 January 2009. The Berliner Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall: www.digital-concert-hall.com Subscribe to our newsletter www.digitalconcerthall.com Website of the Berliner Philharmoniker: www.berliner-philharmoniker.de
Mahler: Symphony No. 3 / Mehta · Berliner Philharmoniker
Mahler: Symphony No. 3 / Mehta · Berliner Philharmoniker Full-length concert at www.digitalconcerthall.com Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 3 / Zubin Mehta, conductor · Berliner Philharmoniker · Lioba Braun, contralto · Rundfunkchor Berlin · Tölzer Knabenchor / Recorded at the Berlin Philharmonie, 21 December 2008. The Berliner Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall: www.digital-concert-hall.com Subscribe to our newsletter www.digitalconcerthall.com Website of the Berliner Philharmoniker: www.berliner-philharmoniker.de
Gustav Mahler - Symphony No. 4 - 4 (1/1) - Leonard Bernstein
Gustav Mahler - Symphony No. 4 - 4 (1/1) - Leonard Bernstein Gustav Mahler Symphony No. 4 in G major 4th Movement (1/1) Sehr behaglich performed by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra (Wiener Philharmoniker) lyrics based on "Des Knaben Wunderhorn" sung by Edith Mathis conducted by Leonard Bernstein
Symphony No.1 in D Major "Titan" III.Funeral March (A)
Symphony No.1 in D Major "Titan" III.Funeral March (A) Music composed by Gustav Mahler. Michael Tilson Thomas; San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Tempo: Feierlich und gemessen, ohne zu schleppen This is Mahler's famous funeral march written in the form of a canon and based upon the children's song, Frère Jacques, played in the minor. It is also famous for opening with a contrabass solo. (Mahler did not actually compose Frère Jacques)
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