Composers

31-40 of 78 videos of music composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff

Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no 5
Rachmaninoff: Piano Concerto no 5 Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff (Russian: Сергей Васильевич Рахманинов, Sergej Vasilevič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 [OS 20 March] 28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He was one of the finest pianists of his day and, as a composer, the last great representative of Russian late Romanticism in classical music. Early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov and other Russian composers gave way to a thoroughly personal idiom which included a pronounced lyricism, expressive breadth, structural ingenuity and a tonal palette of rich, distinctive orchestral colors. The piano figures prominently in Rachmaninoff's compositional output, either as a solo instrument or as part of an ensemble. He made it a point, however, to use his own skills as a performer to explore fully the expressive possibilities of the instrument. Even in his earliest works, he revealed a sure grasp of idiomatic piano writing and a striking gift for melody. Playlist with Rachmaninoff www.youtube.com
Rachmaninov:Cello-Piano Sonata in Gm.IV.Part 2:Allegro Mosso
Rachmaninov:Cello-Piano Sonata in Gm.IV.Part 2:Allegro Mosso Amit Peled (www.amitpeled.com) and Daniel del Pino (www.danieldelpino.com) play the beautiful Part 2 of the 4th movement -- "Allegro Mosso" -- of Rachmaninov's Sonata in G Minor for Cello and Piano. Peled receives rave reviews for his "flair of the young Rostropovich" (American Record Guide), for giving "one of the most sensitive and emotional performances I have ever heard" (Classical Voice of North Carolina), and as "a magnetic performer" with "radiant tone and warmly expressive phrasing" (Cape Cod Symphony). Reviewers in the United States extol Daniel del Pino for his "flawless technical skill"(Palm Beach News)and throughout Spain for his "incredible musicality, sagacious instinct and prodigious technique" (Valladolid), "delicacy, expressive rubato and good taste" (Segovia), and "expressive 'pathos' full of depth and lyricism" (Sevilla). This is a truly exciting duo to watch, hear, and enjoy!
RACHMANINOFF: Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14; STOKOWSKI Anna Moffo
RACHMANINOFF: Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14; STOKOWSKI Anna Moffo Passing Through: www.youtube.com - Friends, Please visit my Poet friend "Passing Through's" YouTube channel: www.youtube.com , and support him - Thanks :) Vocalise, Op. 34 No. 14 is a song by Sergei Rachmaninoff, published in 1912 as the last of his Fourteen Songs, Opus 34. Written for voice (soprano or tenor) with piano accompaniment, it contains no words, and is usually sung entirely to the vowel "ah". It was dedicated to soprano Antonina Nezhdanova. Although the original publication stipulates that the song may be sung by either soprano or tenor voice, it is virtually never performed by a tenor as the male voice's range (an octave lower than a soprano) would sound very odd in relation to the piano accompaniment. The range of the piece is high, going up to a high C-sharp (although Rachmaninoff offers an alternative version which only reaches high A). Conducted by: Leopold Stokowski; Featuring Anna Moffo (We appreciate Wikipaedia's contributions in the descriptions here)
Kissin -Rachmaninov piano concerto n.2, I. Moderato (part1)
Kissin -Rachmaninov piano concerto n.2, I. Moderato (part1) The Rachmaninov C minor concerto, with Evgeny Kissin, accompanied by Sir Andrew Davis conducting the BBCSO.
RACHMANINOV Moment Musical op.16 no. 4- Michel Mañanes Live
RACHMANINOV Moment Musical op.16 no. 4- Michel Mañanes Live Michel Mañanes plays Rachmaninoff Moment Musical Moment op.16 No. 4.All this pieces are played in an "Antique Bösendorfer". www.youtube.com Has won first prize in several young piano competitions. He is Piano Teacher in Madrid and continue to give concerts.Rachmaninov Moment Musical.Classical concert pianist. www.michelmananes.com Sergei Vasilievich Rachmaninoff[a] (Russian: Сергей Васильевич Рахманинов, Sergej Vasil'evič Rakhmaninov, 1 April 1873 [OS 20 March]--28 March 1943) was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. He was one of the finest pianists of his day and, as a composer, the last great representative of Russian late Romanticism in classical music. Early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov and other Russian composers gave way to a thoroughly personal idiom which included a pronounced lyricism, expressive breadth, structural ingenuity and a tonal palette of rich, distinctive orchestral colors.[1] Understandably, the piano figures prominently in Rachmaninoff's compositional output, either as a solo instrument or as part of an ensemble. He made it a point, however, to use his own skills as a performer to explore fully the expressive possibilities of the instrument. Even in his earliest works, he revealed a sure grasp of idiomatic piano writing and a striking gift for melody. In some of his early orchestral pieces he showed the first signs of a talent for tone painting, which he would perfect in The Isle of the Dead,[2] and he began to show a similar ...
Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 2, Op. 18 I. Moderato (Rubinstein)
Rachmaninoff - Piano Concerto No. 2, Op. 18 I. Moderato (Rubinstein) Moderato, first movement from Piano Concerto No. 2, Op. 18 Chicago Symphony Orchestra Fritz Reiner, conductor Arthur Rubinstein, piano The Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18, is a concerto for piano and orchestra, composed by Sergei Rachmaninoff between the autumn of 1900 and April 1901. The second and third movements were first performed with the composer as soloist on 2 December 1900. The complete work was premiered, again with the composer as soloist, on 27 October 1901, with his cousin Alexander Siloti conducting. This piece is one of Rachmaninoff's most enduring popular pieces, and established his fame as a concerto composer. he opening movement begins with a series of bell-like tolling on the piano that build tension, eventually climaxing in the introduction of the main theme. In this first section, the orchestra carries the Russian-character melody while the piano makes an accompaniment made of arpeggios riddled with half steps. After the statement of the long first theme, a quicker transition follows until the more lyrical second theme, in E flat major, is presented. The agitated and unstable development borrows motives from both themes changing keys very often and giving the melody to different instruments while a new musical idea is slowly formed. The music builds in a huge climax as if the work was going to repeat the first bars of the work, but the recapitulation is going to be quite different. While the orchestra restates the first theme, the piano, that ...
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 - Olga Kern - Part 1
Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto No. 3 - Olga Kern - Part 1 Olga Kern plays Sergei Rachmaninoff's third piano concerto.
S. Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a Paganini-theme (part 2) / Somewhere in
S. Rachmaninov, Rhapsody on a Paganini-theme (part 2) / Somewhere in Classical music in movies. The music is used in Szwarcs' movie (cfr. www.naxos.com ), but not necessarily in the scenes of the clip. Watch the video in its context : users.telenet.be
Boris Berezovsky rachmaninov prelude op.23 n°2
Boris Berezovsky rachmaninov prelude op.23 n°2 Boris Berezovsky rachmaninov prelude op.23 n°2
Rachmaninov - Russian Choral Music -
Rachmaninov - Russian Choral Music - Rachmaninov - Russian Choral Music -
YesNo