Composers

51-60 of 78 videos of music composed by Francisco Tárrega

Capricho Arabe - Francisco Tarrega
Capricho Arabe - Francisco Tarrega Andrés Segovia vs Narciso Yepes vs Julian Bream
Gran Vals - Francisco Tárrega
Gran Vals - Francisco Tárrega Beautiful waltz from Francisco Tárrega.
Lagrima, Francisco Tarrega
Lagrima, Francisco Tarrega This was the second classical piece I learned and first to play on stage. I haven't played it in a while... a little rusty, but oh well.
Pablo Sáinz Villegas - Tárrega - Capricho Árabe
Pablo Sáinz Villegas - Tárrega - Capricho Árabe Classical Guitar Pablo Sáinz Villegas - Tárrega - Capricho Árabe Guitarra Clásica
Francisco Tarrega - Capricho Arabe
Francisco Tarrega - Capricho Arabe Visit my website! www.rick-graham.co.uk A beautiful piece written for the guitar by the spanish composer/guitarist Francisco Tarrega
Heike Matthiesen - Recuerdos de la Alhambra
Heike Matthiesen - Recuerdos de la Alhambra Composed by Francisco Tárrega www.obsaitensprung.de http www.savarez.fr
Narciso Yepes - Recuerdos de la Alhambra
Narciso Yepes - Recuerdos de la Alhambra Una de las obras más conocidas de Francisco Tárrega. Recital realizado en 1979 en el Teatro Real de Madrid.
Recuerdos de la Alhambra - Classical Guitar Tremolo
Recuerdos de la Alhambra - Classical Guitar Tremolo Recuerdos de la Alhambra(Remembrances of the Alhambra) is the most famous guitar tremolo piece. Composed by Tarrega (ca. 1899). More classical guitar video history and technique at www.classicalguitarvideo.com A Note About Practicing Tremolo By Stanley Yates Although this is not intended as a full discussion of tremolo technique, I would at least like to provide a few ideas that may be useful for those still developing the technique. Think of the tremolo (pami) as comprising three units: the "compound" am, i and p. Use the following practice sequence to help develop the technique: 1. am play a compound-stoke - as a single unit - but are "staggered" so that m plays after a. This can be achieved by holding ma little further away from the string, as well as by introducing a little tension into the m finger to help time its stroke. Practice am alone, in short bursts. 2. Add the i finger to produce am + i. Practice in short bursts, alternating between a version that places a short pause between am and i and one that plays through. 3. Add the thumb p. Again, alternate between a version that places a pause between am - i and p, and one that plays through. 4. Add a second round of am to produce am - i - p - am. Then add i, then p and so on, until you have a tremolo! (By the way, am return to the string as p plays.) Practice the ornaments in such places as measure 11 as short bursts of p - am, without the left hand at first. Although there's much more to be said about tremolo than ...
Sandro Torlontano (classical guitar) plays Alborada by Francisco Tar
Sandro Torlontano (classical guitar) plays Alborada by Francisco Tar Sandro Torlontano (professor of guitar at Conservatory of Venice) plays Alborada by Francisco Tarrega - guitar by Lorenzo Frignani - video Gianluca Stuard - dop Maurizio Di Zio - www.sandrotorlontano.com
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