Composers

101-108 of 108 videos of music composed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Vals de el Lago de los Cisnes - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Vals de el Lago de los Cisnes - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky I do not own this song

Vals de el Lago de los Cisnes - Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Tchaikovsky Overture 1812 - The Final - ending (V for Vendetta)
Tchaikovsky Overture 1812 - The Final - ending (V for Vendetta) Ouverture Solennelle, L'Année 1812, Op. 49 (Festival Overture, The Year 1812) (Russian: Торжественная увертюра 1812 года, Toržestvennaja uvertjura 1812 goda), better known as the 1812 Overture, is a classical opus written by Russian composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. The piece was written to commemorate Russia's defense of Moscow against Napoleon's advancing Grande Armée at the Battle of Borodino in 1812. The Overture debuted in the Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow on August 20, 1882 (in the Gregorian or NS calendar; the date in the Julian or OS calendar was 8 August). The overture is best known for its climactic volley of cannon fire and ringing chimes. While this piece has no historical connection with United States history, it is often a staple at Fourth of July celebrations. Remember, Remember the 5th of November
Tchaikovsky Trio: Heifetz, Rubinstein, Piatigorsky (part 1)
Tchaikovsky Trio: Heifetz, Rubinstein, Piatigorsky (part 1) Out of the hundreds and thousands of different classical recordings I have heard in my lifetime, I can safely say this is one of my favorites. Heifetz is the greatest violinist the world has ever known and this is one of his best recordings (if you don't believe me, just listen to variation #4). Part 1: First Movement
Swan Lake Ballet Tchaikovsky Act 1 part 1
Swan Lake Ballet Tchaikovsky Act 1 part 1 Academical Orchestra St. Petersburg Conductur : W. Fedotov Choreography: Marius Petipa/Leonid Ivanov Ballet of the Kirov Theatre St. Petersburg Odette/Odile : Yelena Yevteyeva Siegfried : John Markovsky Rothbart : Makhmud Esambayev The Fool : Valery Panov The Prince´s Mother : Alla Kabarova Servant : Viktor Ryazanov Historical Recording from 1968 Screen Adaption : Konstantin Sergeyev Director : Appollinary Dudko The four-act ballet Swan Lake,based on a German fairy tale and with music by Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky,was first produced in Moscow in 1877 at the Bolshoi Theatre with a choreography by Julius Reisinger and was a total failure.After Tchaikovsky´s death in 1893,a memorial to the composer presented the second act,succesfully recoreographed by Lev Ivanov.In 1895 a completely new version of the ballet,choreographed by Ivanov and Marius Petipa was staged at the Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg and this time the ballet received the appreciation that it had rightfully deserved.The new choreography fulfilled the expectations of the Russian public as it added an element of "pressure" to the copmosition. This recording presents a "classical" staging of the ballet from 1968 which based on the Ivanov/Petipa choreography.This Russian screen version of Swan Lake is a colourful and magnificent version of one of the ballet classics of all time,performed by the world.famous Kirov ensemble.
Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture Finale
Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture Finale Piotr Ilich Tchaikovsky, 1812 Overture Finale.
Tchaikovsky - None But The Lonely Hearts
Tchaikovsky - None But The Lonely Hearts Title : Pyotr Il'yich Tchaikovsky,(None But The Lonely Hearts) Songs (6), Op. 6: no 6, None but the lonely heart. This, one of Tchaikovsky's best-loved vocal pieces, comes from his collection of six songs, Op. 6. The fact that it was composed to a Russian translation of its original German text by Goethe often obscures its membership in the large family of setting of the same poem, "Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt" (Only he who knows loneliness). One of Mignon's songs from the novel Wilhelm Meister, this text inspired most of the Romantic lieder composers, most notably Schubert, Schumann, and Wolf, to compose some of their most memorable settings; the poem's sense of desolate yearning speaks to the very heart of Romanticism, and Tchaikovsky certainly owed allegiance to that aesthetic. Tchaikovsky's setting makes use of a syncopated chordal accompaniment; the lack of rhythmic grounding and the chromatic nature of chosen harmonies the inner harmony voices conspire to highlight the restless, disquieted tone of Goethe's text.
Argerich plays Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto Part 1
Argerich plays Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto Part 1 Martha Argerich stunningly plays the Tchaikovsky Concerto in Beppu, Japan, April 22, 2001. Antonio Pappano conducts.
Jascha Heifetz plays Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto 1st mov
Jascha Heifetz plays Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto 1st mov Jascha Heifetz plays Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35: I. Allegro moderato
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