Composers

11-20 of 49 videos of music composed by Georg Philipp Telemann

Georg Philipp Telemann-Tafelmusik-Overture for 2 oboes, strings & co
Georg Philipp Telemann-Tafelmusik-Overture for 2 oboes, strings & co Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) Georg Philipp Telemann (14 March 1681 -- 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Żary, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann. Telemann was one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the Godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. Telemann's music incorporates several national styles: French, Italian, and Polish. He remained at the forefront of all new musical tendencies and his music is an important link between the late Baroque and early Classical styles.
Georg Philipp Telemann-Tafelmusik-Sonata for oboe & continuo in G mi
Georg Philipp Telemann-Tafelmusik-Sonata for oboe & continuo in G mi Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) Sonata for oboe & continuo in G minor (Tafelmusik Book 3, No 5) - TWV41:g6: Siciliana - TWV41:g6: Vivace - TWV41:g6: Dolce (sol mineur) - TWV41:g6: Scherzando Georg Philipp Telemann (14 March 1681 -- 25 June 1767) was a German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist. Almost completely self-taught in music, he became a composer against his family's wishes. After studying in Magdeburg, Zellerfeld, and Hildesheim, Telemann entered the University of Leipzig to study law, but eventually settled on a career in music. He held important positions in Leipzig, Żary, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of the city's five main churches. While Telemann's career prospered, his personal life was always troubled: his first wife died only a few months after their marriage, and his second wife had extramarital affairs and accumulated a large gambling debt before leaving Telemann. Telemann was one of the most prolific composers in history (at least in terms of surviving oeuvre) and was considered by his contemporaries to be one of the leading German composers of the time—he was compared favorably both to his friend Johann Sebastian Bach, who made Telemann the Godfather and namesake of his son Carl Philipp Emanuel, and to George Frideric Handel, whom Telemann also knew personally. Telemann's music incorporates several national styles: French, Italian, and Polish. He remained at the forefront of all ...
Georg Philipp Telemann - Ach wie nichtig, ach wie flüchtig
Georg Philipp Telemann - Ach wie nichtig, ach wie flüchtig Georg Philipp Telemann - Ach wie nichtig, ach wie flüchtig, Kantate TWV 1:38 - Johanna Koslowsky, Sopran - Elisabeth Popien, Alt - Wilfried Jochens, Hans-Jörg Mammel, Tenor - Stephan Schreckenberger, Bass - Cantus Cölln - Ltg.: Konrad Junghänel
Telemann, Paris Quartet III, first movement (animated score)
Telemann, Paris Quartet III, first movement (animated score) The first movement of Georg Philipp Telemann's third Paris Quartet, performed by Concerto Amabile, accompanied by an animated score. FAQ Q: Who is playing this piece? A: This performance is from 1990; the performers are the members of the group Concerto Amabile (Kathleen Kraft, traverso, Elizabeth Blumenstock, violin, Elisabeth Le Guin, violoncello, and Phebe Craig, harpsichord) joined by viola da gambist Margriet Tindemans. Q: This is lovely; where can I hear the rest of the movements of this piece? A: This recording is from the Wild Boar CD "Concerto Amabile, George Phillip Telemann, 'Paris' Quartets 2, 3 & 6" (WLBR8801). I don't know whether the CD is available, but I'm going to find out; I will post information here when I do. Q: I don't like that balls(/bars) display; can I see this with the bars(/balls) display? A: Yes, I've done both versions; here's the balls: www.youtube.com and here are the bars: www.youtube.com and if you can't make up your mind, here's one with both www.youtube.com Q: How did you get the animation synchronized with the recording? A: First I entered the score into the notation program Sibelius. Then, I made a half-speed version of the recording (with the Amazing Slow-Downer software), and adjusted the notation to match (added the ornaments, shortened notes, mistakes made by the performers, etc). Then, while listening to the half-speed recording, I recorded a MIDI click-track. Finally, I fed the score and the click-track into some software I ...
Telemann - Recorder Concerto in F Major - Mov. 2/4
Telemann - Recorder Concerto in F Major - Mov. 2/4 GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN (1681-1767) Concerto for recorder, two violins, viola, cello, violone, and harpsichord 2. Allegro Performed by the Parley of Instruments Featuring Peter Holtslag, treble recorder Conducted by Peter Holman
Telemann - Concerto for Recorder & Viola da Gamba (2)
Telemann - Concerto for Recorder & Viola da Gamba (2) GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN (1681-1767) Concerto for recorder, viola da gamba, strings and basso continuo in A minor TWV52:a1 3. Dolce 4. Allegro Performed by Les Boreades Featuring Francis Colpron, recorder
Telemann - Sinfonia〈Die Tageszeiten〉secular cantata, TWV 20:39 (
Telemann - Sinfonia〈Die Tageszeiten〉secular cantata, TWV 20:39 ( Georg Philipp Telemann (1681~1767) 《Die Tageszeiten》Kammerkantate, 1759 - 1. Sinfonia - Collegium Musicum Freiburg Wolfgang Schäfer (conductor)
Telemann - Paris Quartet No. 1 in D - Mov. 1-3/6
Telemann - Paris Quartet No. 1 in D - Mov. 1-3/6 GEORG PHILIPP TELEMANN (1681-1767) Paris Quartet for No. 1 for transverse flute, violin, viola da gamba (or cello), and basso continuo in D Major TWV 43: D3 1. Prelude: Vivement 2. Tendrement 3. Vite Performed by Florilegium *TRIVIA!: Among the subscribers to Telemann's first set of Paris Quartets were Blavet, Caix, Charpentier, Mondonville, Bach, Fasch and Pisendel.
Telemann - "Canary" Cantata - Fischer-Dieskau Pt 3 of 3
Telemann - "Canary" Cantata - Fischer-Dieskau Pt 3 of 3 This is a tragic-comic cantata on the killing of a canary by a cat. A heartfelt lament. Telemanns Cantata oder Trauer-Music eines kunsterfahrenen Canarienvogels, als derselbe zum grössten Leidwesen seines Herrn Possessoris verstorben (Cantata or Funeral Music for an Artistically Trained Canary-Bird Whose Demise Brought the Greatest Sorrow to his Master) — the Canary Cantata — was composed around 1737, probably as a personal favor or on a commission from a now-forgotten Hamburg pet lover; the author of the text is unknown. The work is generally viewed as an ironic and mock-serious cat-that-got-the-canary tale, but the touching lament of the last aria (My canary, good night!) and the closing lines of the final recitative — which uses a low German dialect given a surprisingly vehement setting — indicate a deeper sentiment in the music that reflects the loss of even this tiny life. It is worth noting that included in the intrumental ensemble is Fischer-Dieskau's first wife, the cellist Irmgard Poppen, who died in childbirth in 1963. Uploading this in three parts. When originally uploaded I had only the English translation. Someone has kindly written down the German text of this cantata for me, which I have now added to my comments. My heartfelt thanks to You Tube user Frerki for taking the time to do this. Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) Trauer-Musik eines kunsterfahrenen Kanarien-Vogels (Funeral Music for an Artistically Trained Canary-Bird ) Part 3 Rezitativ Allein, was ...
Telemann - "Canary" Cantata - Fischer-Dieskau Pt 1 of 3
Telemann - "Canary" Cantata - Fischer-Dieskau Pt 1 of 3 This is a tragic-comic cantata on the killing of a pet canary by a cat. A heartfelt lament. Telemanns Cantata oder Trauer-Music eines kunsterfahrenen Canarienvogels, als derselbe zum grössten Leidwesen seines Herrn Possessoris verstorben (Cantata or Funeral Music for an Artistically Trained Canary-Bird Whose Demise Brought the Greatest Sorrow to his Master) — the Canary Cantata — was composed around 1737, probably as a personal favor or on a commission from a now-forgotten Hamburg pet lover; the author of the text is unknown. The work is generally viewed as an ironic and mock-serious cat-that-got-the-canary tale, but the touching lament of the last aria (My canary, good night!) and the closing lines of the final recitative — which uses a low German dialect given a surprisingly vehement setting — indicate a deeper sentiment in the music that reflects the loss of even this tiny life. It is worth noting that included in the intrumental ensemble is Fischer-Dieskau's first wife, the cellist Irmgard Poppen, who died in childbirth in 1963. Uploading this in three parts. When originally uploaded I had only the English translation. Someone has kindly written down the German text of this cantata for me, which I have now added to my comments. My heartfelt thanks to You Tube user Frerki for taking the time to do this. Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) Trauer-Musik eines kunsterfahrenen Kanarien-Vogels (Funeral Music for an Artistically Trained Canary-Bird ) Part 1 Arie O weh, mein ...
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