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Francisco Tárrega Recuerdos de la Alhambra..ذكرياتي
Francisco Tárrega Recuerdos de la Alhambra..ذكرياتي Don't call it last / don't think it's gone as long your fingers / play those sweet notes. As long your two hands / move on the fretboard and your heart rumbles / like drums and horns! Countless are, really, / the grains of sand: for one that is lost, / one can be found! Painful can be, Love, / seems it can kill... but when you're loved / all pains are healed. Just don't despair! / Don't say "never"! For you in the desert / an oasis waits there. danbergam So , I go back in my memories to my childhood in tife, And I like to take you with me in this journey.. Sorry cus I remove this video before But I think its better now with the new editing. yah, If you fall in love with abby ( the girl in my video } just gave her a visit and drop her a message, she will be happy to replay for etch message.. her channel: www.youtube.com
Anton Diabelli : Sonatina in F major, Op. 168 No. 1
Anton Diabelli : Sonatina in F major, Op. 168 No. 1 Moderato cantabile; Andante cantabile; Allegretto -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Austrian composer and music publisher Anton Diabelli (1781-1858) is remembered for two things. First, there was the waltz he sent around to various composers of the day in 1819, requesting them to write variations for an anthology. The challenge was, of course, best met by Beethoven, who wrote a whole set. Second, there are the eleven sonatinas (Opp. 151 and 168), which are still studied by many students to this day. I had never systematically studied them, although I probably learned one or two movements as a boy. However, I was given a copy of the Op. 168 set recently, and got much pleasure from playing through them - admiring the way Diabelli distilled the essence of a late classical sonata into miniature forms. Just for a change, I have used a different camera angle for this video - but anyone learning this piece should not copy my hand movements, as I have acquired some unusual mannerisms through the years! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Played by Phillip Sear www.psear.co.uk
Anton Diabelli : Sonatina in G major, Op. 168 No. 2
Anton Diabelli : Sonatina in G major, Op. 168 No. 2 Allegro moderato; Andante sostenuto; Rondo (Allegretto) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Austrian composer and music publisher Anton Diabelli (1781-1858) is remembered for two things. First, there was the waltz he sent around to various composers of the day in 1819, requesting them to write variations for an anthology. The challenge was, of course, best met by Beethoven, who wrote a whole set. Second, there are the eleven sonatinas (Opp. 151 and 168), which are still studied by many students to this day. I had never systematically studied them, although I probably learned one or two movements as a boy. However, I was given a copy of the Op. 168 set recently, and got much pleasure from playing through them - admiring the way Diabelli distilled the essence of a late classical sonata into miniature forms. I am particularly taken by the sparkling little rondo of this sonatina. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Played by Phillip Sear www.psear.co.uk
The Painted Veil - Love Scene - Gnossienne 1 (Classical Piano)
The Painted Veil - Love Scene - Gnossienne 1 (Classical Piano) Scenes from the movie "The Panted Veil" with music by Erik Satie. The movie starred Naomi Watts and Edward Norton. Please comment, rate and subscribe!!! All copyrights reserved to original/rightful singer/songwriter/artist/music production companies. No copyright infringement intended Copyright Disclaimer under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
Gymnopedie 3 - Erik Satie (Classical Piano) Photos by Pianopod
Gymnopedie 3 - Erik Satie (Classical Piano) Photos by Pianopod This video is the third of the three Gymnopédies with a slide show which I have called "Evening Skies". I took these photos at various locations around the world, including Lake Garda in Italy, Antigua in the Caribbean, The Algarve in Portugal, and on the Island of Lanzarote. Unfortunately, I am not playing the piano in this video. The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist Erik Satie. The Gymnopédies are the first compositions with which Erik Satie tried to cut himself loose from the conventional 19th century "salon music" environment of his father and stepmother. Satie apparently used the word "gymnopédiste" (gymnopaedist), before having written a note of his later so famous gymnopédies. The anecdote of Satie introducing himself as a "gymnopaedist" in December 1887 runs as follows: the first time Satie visited the Chat Noir cabaret, he was introduced to its director, Rodolphe Salis, famous for serving sharp comments. Being coerced to mention his profession, Satie, lacking any recognisable professional occupation, presented himself as a "gymnopaedist", supposedly in an attempt to outwit the director. The composition of the three Gymnopédies started only two months later, and was completed in April 1888. In August 1888, the "First Gymnopédie" was published, accompanied by the verse of Contamine quoted above. However, it remains uncertain whether the poem was composed before the music, or ...
Gymnopedie 1 - Erik Satie (Classical Piano) Photos by Pianopod
Gymnopedie 1 - Erik Satie (Classical Piano) Photos by Pianopod This video is the first of the three Gymnopédies with a slide show which I have called "The Forest". I took these photos on a rainy day in the South Island of New Zealand. Unfortunately, I am not playing the piano in this video, the pianist is Aldo Ciccolini. I plan to upload a video of myself playing this piece in the near future. I will be uploading the second and third Gymnopédie over the next week. The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist Erik Satie. The Gymnopédies are the first compositions with which Erik Satie tried to cut himself loose from the conventional 19th century "salon music" environment of his father and stepmother. Satie apparently used the word "gymnopédiste" (gymnopaedist), before having written a note of his later so famous gymnopédies. The anecdote of Satie introducing himself as a "gymnopaedist" in December 1887 runs as follows: the first time Satie visited the Chat Noir cabaret, he was introduced to its director, Rodolphe Salis, famous for serving sharp comments. Being coerced to mention his profession, Satie, lacking any recognisable professional occupation, presented himself as a "gymnopaedist", supposedly in an attempt to outwit the director. The composition of the three Gymnopédies started only two months later, and was completed in April 1888. In August 1888, the "First Gymnopédie" was published, accompanied by the verse of Contamine quoted above. However, it ...
Percy Elliott : Rosemary ( Remembrance ) , intermezzo
Percy Elliott : Rosemary ( Remembrance ) , intermezzo The British composer, conductor and violinist Percy Elliott (1870-1932) wrote several suites with picturesque titles, and also songs (some under the pseudonyms Godfrey Newark and Walter Bush). This piece, like Elliott's other music will appeal to anyone who likes the songs of Amy Woodforde-Finden or Haydn Wood, and even has the odd hint of Elgar. It was published in versions for violin and piano and orchestra as well as this piano solo version. The title derives from the linkage since ancient times of the shrub rosemary with remembrance and funerals: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." (Shakespeare, Hamlet, iv. 5.) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Played by Phillip Sear www.psear.co.uk
Muzio Clementi : Sonatina in C, Op. 36 No. 1
Muzio Clementi : Sonatina in C, Op. 36 No. 1 Allegro; Andante; Vivace ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Italian pianist and composer Muzio Clementi (1752-1832) is best known today for his 'Gradus ad Parnassum' collection of piano studies, and for his sonatinas. Of course, most pianists learn them as students and then put them away, as I did myself. But I had a look at them again recently, and realised what wonderful perfect miniatures of classical style they are, and what fun they are to play. And all three movements will fit well into a YouTube video! ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Played by Phillip Sear www.psear.co.uk
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