Composers

1-4 of 4 results for BAKER

Gabriel Fauré -Les Berceaux Op 23 nº 1 - Janet Baker
Gabriel Fauré -Les Berceaux Op 23 nº 1 - Janet Baker Musica: Gabriel Fauré Poesia : Suily Prudhomme Dame Janet Baker : Mezzo Soprano Geoffrey Parsons: Piano Les Berceaux Le long du Quai, les grands vaisseaux, Que la houle incline en silence, Ne prennent pas garde aux berceaux, Que la main des femmes balance. Mais viendra le jour des adieux, Car il faut que les femmes pleurent, Et que les hommes curieux Tentent les horizons qui leurrent! Et ce jour-là les grands vaisseaux, Fuyant le port qui diminue, Sentent leur masse retenue Par l'âme des lointains berceaux. Cradles Along the quay, the great ships, that ride the swell in silence, take no notice of the cradles. that the hands of the women rock. But the day of farewells will come, when the women must weep, and curious men are tempted towards the horizons that lure them! And that day the great ships, sailing away from the diminishing port, feel their bulk held back by the spirits of the distant cradles.
Maurice Delage - Quatre Poèmes hindous (2/4) Lahore
Maurice Delage - Quatre Poèmes hindous (2/4) Lahore Maurice Delage (13 November 1879 - 21 September 1961) was a French composer and pianist. Janet Baker and Melos Ensemble Delage was born and died in Paris. A student of Ravel and member of Les Apaches, he was influenced by travels to India and the East. Ravel's "La vallée des cloches" from Miroirs was dedicated to Delage. Delage's best known piece is Quatre poèmes hindous (1912-1913). His Ragamalika (1912-1922), based on the classical music of India, is also significant in that it calls for prepared piano; the score specifies that a piece of cardboard be placed under the strings of the B-flat in the second line of the bass clef to dampen the sound, imitating the sound of an Indian drum.
Fritz Wunderlich Handel: Xerxes "Ombra mai fu" (Largo)
Fritz Wunderlich Handel: Xerxes "Ombra mai fu" (Largo) Vinyl Fritz Wunderlich Handel: Xerxes "Ombra mai fu" (Largo) Handel: Xerxes "Ombra ma fu" (Largo) Fritz Wunderlich, lyric tenor an operbathosa video Friedrich "Fritz" Karl Otto Wunderlich (September 26, 1930 September 17, 1966) was a German lyric tenor, born in Kusel in the Rhineland. His mother was a violinist and his father was a choir-master. For a short time, the family kept the inn "Emrichs Bräustübl". Fritz's father lost his job due to pressure imposed upon him by local Nazis, in addition to suffering from a severe battlefield injury. He committed suicide when Fritz was five years old. The story regarding Wunderlich's discovery parallels many of his contemporaries (notably Nicolai Gedda and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau). As a young man Wunderlich worked in a bakery. At the insistence of neighbors and passers-by who had witnessed his musical gifts and beautiful voice, Wunderlich decided to begin studies in music. He managed to obtain a scholarship in order to pursue his studies at the Freiburg College of Music where he studied French horn and voice. Wunderlich was soon noted as a brilliant young tenor, especially in Mozartian roles, but he later expanded his reach to the full range of the lyric tenor repertoire. It was the fashion during Wunderlich's career for German theaters to perform operas in the local rather than original language. Therefore, most of his recordings of the standard operatic repertoire are sung in German, including Verdi's Rigoletto and Don Carlos ...
Mon Coeur S'Ouvre À Ta Voix (Camille Saint-Saëns; Samson et Delil
Mon Coeur S'Ouvre À Ta Voix (Camille Saint-Saëns; Samson et Delil FACEBOOK www.facebook.com BLOGSPOT tonyrclef.blogspot.com EMAIL tonyrclef@gmail.com Album "tony r clef - tuesday afternoon" on Itunes "Mon Coeur S'Ouvre À Ta Voix" (literally "My Heart is Opened (or "Opens Itself") At Your Voice" but usually translated as "My heart at your sweet voice", I think) Music by Camille Saint-Saëns. A very famous aria from his opera "Samson et Delila". Watch the lovely Risë Stevens singing it from the film "The Chocolate Soldier" (also with Nelson Eddy and Nigel Bruce (he who played Dr. Watson to Basil Rathbone's Holmes)) www.youtube.com The movie is great fun if you get a chance to see it. TCM shows it from time to time. There's several blemishes in this that I'd fix if I ever broke down and decided to make little audio edits before posting, especially in such a long piece. But in the interest of "live" I present this to you as is, pimples and all. My arrangement. Learned by ear. I have nothing written down. Taylor NS54-ce, hybrid classical Drop C# tuning (ie, Drop-D a half step flat to match original pitch) D'addario Pro Arte normal tension nylon strings
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