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Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 15 / Fischer · Berliner Philharmoniker
Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 15 / Fischer · Berliner Philharmoniker Full-length concert at www.digitalconcerthall.com Johannes Brahms: Hungarian Dance No. 15 (orch. Iván Fischer) / Iván Fischer, conductor · Berliner Philharmoniker / Recorded at the Berlin Philharmonie, 24 October 2009. The Berliner Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall: dch.berliner-phi...
Johannes Brahms -- YouTube Symphony Orchestra
Johannes Brahms -- YouTube Symphony Orchestra www.youtube.com/symphony The YouTube Symphony Orchestra performs Johannes Brahms - Allegro giocoso from Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op. 98 on April 15, 2009 @ Carnegie Hall. Selected by the YouTube community and several members of the world's most renowned orchestras, the YouTube Symphony Orchestra is made up of over 96 professional and amateur musicians from 30+ countries and territories on six continents and represents 26 different instruments.
Brahms "Double" concert - Heifetz Feurmann - 1° Part (part1)
Brahms "Double" concert - Heifetz Feurmann - 1° Part (part1) Brahms Concerto for violin, cello & orchestra in A minor "Double", Op.102 1° PART (part1) Orchestra: Philadelphia Orchestra Director: Eugene Ormandy Violin: Jascha Heifetz Cello: Emanuel Feurmann --- 1° PART (part1) www.youtube.com 1° PART (part2) www.youtube.com 2° PART www.youtube.com 3° PART www.youtube.com --- Listen to radio stations from your browser www.toolbar-radio.com World version --- Digital Remastering of 78 RPM Records Only Classical Music Public Domain PromoClassical Copyright reserved
Brahms "Double" concert - Heifetz Feurmann - 1° Part (part2)
Brahms "Double" concert - Heifetz Feurmann - 1° Part (part2) Brahms Concerto for violin, cello & orchestra in A minor "Double", Op.102 1° PART (part2) Orchestra: Philadelphia Orchestra Director: Eugene Ormandy Violin: Jascha Heifetz Cello: Emanuel Feurmann --- 1° PART (part1) www.youtube.com 1° PART (part2) www.youtube.com 2° PART www.youtube.com 3° PART www.youtube.com --- Listen to radio stations from your browser www.toolbar-radio.com World version --- Digital Remastering of 78 RPM Records Only Classical Music Public Domain PromoClassical Copyright reserved
DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n. 5 (Johannes Brahms).
DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n. 5 (Johannes Brahms). DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n.5 (Johannes Brahms). David Garrett (born as David Bongartz on September 4, 1980 ) is a record breaking German/American classical violinist and recording artist. Garrett was born in Aachen, Germany to an American prima ballerina and the German lawyer and jurist, Georg Peter Bongartz. He adopted his mother's maiden name as a pseudonym. Musical education When Garrett was four years old, his father bought a violin for his older brother. The young Garrett took an interest and soon learned to play. A year later, he took part in a competition and won first prize. By the age of seven, he was playing once a week in public. He studied violin at the Lübeck Conservatoire. At the age of 12, Garrett began working with the distinguished Polish violinist Ida Haendel, often traveling to London and other European cities to meet her. He continued his studies at the Royal College of Music in London. In 2004, he graduated from the Juilliard School in New York City and was one of the first students to study there with Itzhak Perlman. Career At the age of 13, Garrett recorded two CDs, appeared on German and Dutch television, and gave a concert in the residence of the Federal Republic of Germany President, the Villa Hammerschmidt, at Dr. von Weizsäcker's personal invitation. He was offered the use of the famous Stradivarius "San Lorenzo", which is among the best instruments of the "golden period". At the age of 14, as the youngest soloist ever, Garrett signed an ...
Brahms Piano Quartet C Minor 3rd mvt Andante opus 60
Brahms Piano Quartet C Minor 3rd mvt Andante opus 60 One of Brahms' most beautiful slow movements, for string trio with piano. FAQ Q: Who is playing this piece? A: Sorry, I don't know. I licensed this recording from Keith Salmon, of Royalty Free Classical Music (dot org). Q: Who is this Brahms person? A: You can read about him here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahms Q: If it's a piano quartet, why do I hear violins? A: A piece of music for a solo instrument accompanied by a piano is most often called a sonata (violin sonata, flute sonata, etc.), but when a string trio (violin, viola, violoncello) is joined by a piano, it's called a piano quartet. A piece for four pianists is usually referred to as "eight-hand piano music." Go figure. Q: Something sounds wrong in the second beat of the measure that starts at 5:26. A: Yes; the violist plays a D-natural on the second beat; it should be a D-sharp. Q: This is really beautiful; what other pieces are like this? A: I don't know of another piece that's this beautiful in quite this way, but the other piano trios, quartets and quintets of Schubert, Schumann and Brahms are really good, so that's a good place to start. Q: Is there a way I could make the bar-graph scores myself? A: The Music Animation Machine MIDI file player will generate this display; you can get the (Windows) software here: http://www.musanim.com/player/ There are lots of places on the web where you can get MIDI files; I usually go to the Classical Archives site first: http://www.classicalarchives.com/ Q: Could you do a MAM video of _________? A: Please read this: http://www.musanim.com/all/MAMRequests.html Q: Can I get a DVD with videos like this? A: Yes: http://www.musanim.com/mam/video.html Q: What do the colors in the bar-graph score mean? A: The colors indicate: violin, viola, violoncello, piano top staff, piano bottom staff. Q: Why do the scores move at different speeds? A: The bar-graph score is graphical, and in it, time translates exactly into horizontal position; conventional notation is symbolic, so there is usually one symbol per note, regardless of whether it's a long or a short note, and the symbols are more or less evenly spaced (for legibility); so, when the notes are faster, the notation needs to move faster to keep up. Q: Why am I crying? A: I don't know, but the first time I heard this piece in a concert, I cried too. I also cried the first time I read through it with string players. Something about it. .
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 / Rattle · Berliner Philharmoniker Full-length concert at www.digitalconcerthall.com Johannes Brahms: Symphony No. 1 / Sir Simon Rattle, conductor · Berliner Philharmoniker / Recorded at the Berlin Philharmonie, 1 November 2008. The Berliner Philharmoniker's Digital Concert Hall: www.digital-concert-hall.com Subscribe to our newsletter www.digitalconcerthall.com Website of the Berliner Philharmoniker: www.berliner-philharmoniker.de
Brahms Symphony 4 - Victor De Sabata - 1° Movement (part1)
Brahms Symphony 4 - Victor De Sabata - 1° Movement (part1) Brahms Symphony No.4 in E Minor, Op.98 1° MOVEMENT (part1) Orchestra: Berliner Philharmoniker Director: Victor De Sabata --- 1° MOVEMENT (part1) www.youtube.com 1° MOVEMENT (part2) www.youtube.com 2° MOVEMENT (part1) www.youtube.com 2° MOVEMENT (part2) www.youtube.com 3° MOVEMENT www.youtube.com 4° MOVEMENT www.youtube.com --- Listen to radio stations from your browser www.toolbar-radio.com World version --- Digital Remastering of 78 RPM Records Only Classical Music Public Domain PromoClassical Copyright reserved
Jascha Heifetz plays Brahms Hungarian Dance No. 7
Jascha Heifetz plays Brahms Hungarian Dance No. 7 Jascha Heifetz plays Hungarian Dance #7 by Johannes Brahms (transcribed by Heifetz). Accompanist: Emanuel Bay
Johannes Brahms - Hungarian Dance No. 5
Johannes Brahms - Hungarian Dance No. 5 Johannes Brahms Hungarian Dance No. 5 in G minor The German composer, pianist, and conductor Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) was one of the most significant composers of the 19th century. His works greatly enriched the romantic repertory.
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