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Dark, Evil, Intense, Fast, Classical Music Masterpieces. ( I )
Dark, Evil, Intense, Fast, Classical Music Masterpieces. ( I ) I do NOT own nor did I perform any of the pieces in the video... This is just to share some of the most entertaining works of the composers... This is a list for the people who are interested in this kind of classical music.... This is obviously a list made by a beginner (Me) I made everything simple in the video because I hate wasting time on things like introduction and things like that... I have listed the works in the descriptions in case of mistakes... Compositions in this video by number: 1- Bela Bartok - String Quartet II Allegro Molto Capriccioso 2- Richard Wagner - Faust Overture 3- Camille Saint-Saens - Danse Macabre 4- Sergei Prokofiev - The Alien God and the Dance of the Evil Spirits 5- Antonio Vivaldi - 10 - The Four Seasons (Le quattro stagioni), Op. 8 6- Modest Mussorgsky - The hut on hen's legs (Baba-Yaga) 7- Edvard Grieg - In the hall of the mountain King 8- Franz Liszt - Totentanz for Piano and Orchestra 9- Hector Berlioz - Symphonie Fantastique, Op.14 : Épisode de la vie d'un Artiste...en cinq parties 10- Dmitri Shostakovich - Chamber Symphony , Op110a Enjoy and let me know if there is a mistake ^ I also do not min suggestions...
Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet - Montagues and Capulets, Dance Of The K
Prokofiev: Romeo and Juliet - Montagues and Capulets, Dance Of The K Great piece, maybe my favourite out of all Prokofiev's music. Montagues and Capulets also known as Dance of the Knights is a score composed by Sergei Prokofiev. It is from Act I, Scene 2 of the ballet Romeo and Juliet. A dark and atmospheric piece, it has become a de facto signature tune for the Soviet era, and is used as the soundtrack for numerous dramas, documentaries and adverts that have Soviet subject matter. It was used as the background music in a popular 1990s French commercial for Chanel's Egoiste fragrance, and it was the competition music for the Canadian television mockumentary Kenny vs. Spenny. The piece has also been used as the theme score for the English football club Sunderland who play at the Stadium of Light in order to evoke a stirring mood before kick-off and to trouble the nerves of visiting opponents. Since the stadium opened in 1997, Dance of the Knights is played, in full, before the teams walk out onto the pitch before the game. The use of the piece in this context saw interest in Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet rise sharply in the North-East of England toward the end of the 1990s.[citation needed] Furthermore, this composition is used as title music for the movie Caligula. The German Technical Death Metal band Necrophagist uses a portion of this piece at the end of their song Only Ash Remains. It is also used in the song 'Lords of Bedlam' by the Austrian symphonic death metal band Hollenthon. The Smiths would also famously come on stage to the ...
Poeme (Fibich, arr. Wermuth) played by Stellae Boreales
Poeme (Fibich, arr. Wermuth) played by Stellae Boreales Stellae Boreales, a youth violin choir from Ottawa, Canada, plays Wermuth's arrangement of Fibich's Poeme, at Bustadarkirkja (Reykjavik, Iceland) during their July 2011 performance tour of the Reykjavik area. Stellae Boreales thanks Kun Shoulder Rest Inc. (www.kunrest.com) for their generous support, which has made this trip possible
[Arthaus 100713] TCHAIKOVSKY: Swan Lake (Bolshoi Ballet, 1989)
[Arthaus 100713] TCHAIKOVSKY: Swan Lake (Bolshoi Ballet, 1989) From the Bolshoi Theatre 1989. Swan Lake is the very essence of classical ballet and has a rather venerable history of its own. First choreographed in 1877 by the great Marius Petipa for the Bolshoi, this original choreography has since been tweaked by almost every choreographer to get hold of it down through the years. Yuri Grigorovich keeps the general outline of the story of a prince who falls in love with the mythic half-woman, half-swan Odette (only to betray her when she appears to him in disguise as Odile). Grigorovich however added a controversial twist with his inclusion of a psychological dimension to the proceedings: the evil sorcerer cast as the dark twin of the hero-prince. The pearl of this production is undoubtedly Alla Mikhalchenko as Odette-Odile. Her impressive technique and brilliant acting gives the character a new expressive dimension. (Arthaus 100713) More Info.: www.naxos.com
Saint-Saëns: Danse Macabre
Saint-Saëns: Danse Macabre Saint-Saëns : Danse Macabre Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: "Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed." en.wikipedia.org This is my second video. The first, which I uploaded about one year ago, was Pachelbel's famous Canon in D. youtube.com If you enjoyed this kind of music, you should start visiting my user's page regularly: I'll start uploading classical pieces regularly, probably about 1-2 videos a month including all the famous composers and more. Enjoy :) PS: Don't forget to rate and share your opinions! But PLEASE, PLEASE try to make comments to the point, or else I will have to control your comments and that's alot of pain in the ass...XD *And to all who wonder, I'm sorry but I can't send you the .mp3, sorry!
Camille Saint-Saëns - Danse Macabre
Camille Saint-Saëns - Danse Macabre Danse Macabre (first performed in 1875) is the name of opus 40 by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns. The composition is based upon a poem by Henri Cazalis, on an old French superstition: Zig, zig, zig, Death in a cadence, Striking with his heel a tomb, Death at midnight plays a dance-tune, Zig, zig, zig, on his violin. The winter wind blows and the night is dark; Moans are heard in the linden trees. Through the gloom, white skeletons pass, Running and leaping in their shrouds. Zig, zig, zig, each one is frisking, The bones of the dancers are heard to crack— But hist! of a sudden they quit the round, They push forward, they fly; the cock has crowed. According to the ancient superstition, "Death" appears at midnight every year on Halloween. Death has the power to call forth the dead from their graves to dance for him while he plays his fiddle (represented by a solo violin with its E-string tuned to an E-flat in an example of scordatura tuning). His skeletons dance for him until the first break of dawn, when they must return to their graves until the next year. The piece opens with a harp playing a single note, D, twelve times to signify the clock striking midnight, accompanied by soft chords from the string section. This then leads to the eerie E flat and A chords (also known as a tritone or the "Devil's chord") played by a solo violin, representing death on his fiddle. After which the main theme is heard on a solo flute and is followed by a descending scale on the solo ...
Frédéric Chopin's "Raindrop" Prelude, Op 28, No. 15
Frédéric Chopin's "Raindrop" Prelude, Op 28, No. 15 Beginning in D-Flat Major, this piece focuses on inner confliction and the contemplation of the solitary self. The composition was born from the mind of Frédéric Chopin in 1858 during his stay at the Valldemossa monastery. Amantine Dupin once commented, "It casts the soul into a terrible dejection. Maurice and I had left [Chopin] in good health one morning to go shopping in Palma for things we needed at our "encampment." The rain came in overflowing torrents. We made three leagues in six hours, only to return in the middle of a flood. We got back in absolute dark, shoeless, having been abandoned by our driver to cross unheard of perils. We hurried, knowing how our sick one would worry. Indeed he had, but now was as though congealed in a kind of quiet desperation, and, weeping, he was playing his wonderful prelude. Seeing us come in, he got up with a cry, then said with a bewildered air and a strange tone, "Ah, I was sure that you were dead." When he recovered his spirits and saw the state we were in, he was ill, picturing the dangers we had been through, but he confessed to me that while waiting for us he had seen it all in a dream, and no longer distinguishing the dream from reality, he became calm and drowsy. While playing the piano, persuaded that he was dead himself, he saw himself drown in a lake. Heavy drops of icy water fell in a regular rhythm on his breast, and when I made him listen to the sound of the drops of water indeed falling in rhythm on the roof, he ...
"La donna è mobile" - Giuseppe Verdi, from Rigoletto: Transcripti
"La donna è mobile" - Giuseppe Verdi, from Rigoletto: Transcripti www.onlineguitaracademy.net - A Romantic Period composer, Verdi (1813-1901) had his greatest success with opera and other vocal works. Rigoletto is one of his best-known. A tangled drama portraying affairs, betrayal, and revenge, Rigoletto is as relevant today as it was when it was written. "La donna è mobile," a canzone sung by a playboy, the Duke of Mantua, about the fickleness of women, gives the audience a moment of comic relief in the midst of a dark tale. The moment of irony, of which the character is blissfully unaware, reveals itself as the womanizer boasts about his superiority to women in the area of stability, even as he plots his next conquest. A surprisingly feminist element in an opera from the mid-nineteenth century, the commentary on gender issues still speaks to audiences today. Ifyou would like to learn to play this piece and add it to your repertoire, take advantage of the free mini-lesson on this piece, available on Los Angeles Guitar Academy's website, http To access sheet music, close-up, slow walk-through clips for this piece and LAGA's complete online classical guitar lesson program to bring your playing up to this level and beyond, enroll in a full subscription to LAGA's online classical guitar lessons, LAGA Classical. You can get started today by signing up for a free, no-obligation, three-day trial on the website listed above. For updates on our latest music postings, please subscribe to our YouTube channel on the button above. Thanks!
Adele - Rolling in the Deep (Piano/Cello Cover)
Adele - Rolling in the Deep (Piano/Cello Cover) Want to become a Piano Guys founder? Click link for all the exciting details www.thepianoguys.com Be first to receive our Limited Edition PianoGuys album! (Youtube hits) here: www.thepianoguys.com Download from iTunes here itunes.apple.com Download on Amazon: www.amazon.com For this week's video we decided to challenge ourselves. We picked a pop tune at the top of the charts -- one that wouldn't be an obvious candidate for an instrumental cover. "Rolling in the Deep" jumped out at us. The writers, Paul Epworth and Adele, described it as a "dark blues-y gospel disco tune." What could be more challenging for a classically-trained cellist and pianist? We locked ourselves in the studio (ok, not literally) and began work on the introduction. It wasn't working. The end. Just kidding...:-) The song came alive when we found a destined matchup in the melody from Gustav Holst's classical piece "Jupiter"—a deep melody that rang out when layered on top of everything we were creating for this arrangement. To make a long studio-story short, it all came together after that. ALL sounds were created by acoustic & electric cellos (5 different cellos) and piano. By the time we were finished we had used 60 tracks. Here's a link to the VOCAL VERSION! www.youtube.com What song should we cover next? Leave a comment! Follow the Piano Guys at www.Facebook.com Follow Steven Sharp Nelson at www.Facebook.com Follow Jon Schmidt at www.Facebook.com Credits Rolling in the Deep written by Paul Epworth ...
Albert Roussel: Symphony No.3 in G minor, op.42 [1/4]
Albert Roussel: Symphony No.3 in G minor, op.42 [1/4] Albert Roussel (1869-1937): Symphony No.3 in G minor, op.42 [1929-1930] I. Allegro vivo BBC Symphony Orchestra Lionel Bringuier, conductor At every stage of his career, Roussel's best work is masterly finished, engaging, surefire. But for the connoisseur, tracing his stylistic evolution possesses a fascination of its own. If the opera-ballet Padmåvatî (1914-1918) crowns his second manner, making explicit the preoccupation with instinct and annihilation ironically broached in the ballet Le Festin de l'araignée (1912), his Symphony No. 2 (1919-1920) encapsulates the period with formal yet disturbing point. The ironic detachment of Le Festin gives way to dark (and harmonically adventurous) foreboding, while the irrepressibly animated episodes are fraught with frenzied feverishness. But by the mid-1920s the skies had cleared, so to speak, and Roussel entered his final, neo-Classical, phase with the orchestral Suite in F (1926) whose three movements—two in Baroque dance forms—afford a foretaste of the Symphony No. 3 in their effortless combination of energy and serenity. Commissioned by Koussevitzky, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Suite received its premiere by those forces January 21, 1927, continuing a Francophile tradition that had seen Henri Rabaud and Pierre Monteux as chef d'orchestre, and entertained Roussel's teacher and colleague, Vincent d'Indy, in 1905 and 1921. To celebrate the BSO's 50th anniversary, Koussevitzky commissioned a number of works ...
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