Composers

1-9 of 9 results for Jeunehomme

Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme" 1st Mvt
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme" 1st Mvt K. 271 E flat major "Jeunehomme" 1. Allegro Johan Hugosson - Piano Ensemble from Malmo Symphony Orchestra Cadenza by J.Hugosson/ Mozart Leader: Jorgen Svensson Film directed by Jonas Grimas Audio recorded by Green Hat Music & Sound - Olle Grane Produced by Mint AB - Leif Mohlin Recorded live March 2011 in Staffanstorp, Sweden.
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme" in E flat major, K. 271 (
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme" in E flat major, K. 271 ( Viviana Sofronitzki Fortepiano The Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme" in E flat major, K. 271, by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was written in Salzburg in 1777, when Mozart was 21 years old. The work has long been known as the "Jeunehomme" Concerto. It was said that Mozart wrote the piece for a French pianist "Jeunehomme" when she visited Salzburg. But scholars couldn't identify the woman for whom he actually wrote it. Recently, the musicologist Michael Lorenz has argued that the woman was actually Victoire Jenamy (1749-1812), a daughter of Jean-Georges Noverre, a famous dancer who was one of Mozart's best friends.[1] The work is scored for solo piano, two oboes, two horns, and strings. It consists of three movements: 1. Allegro, in E-flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and cut time. The first movement opens, unusually for the time, with interventions by the soloist, anticipating Beethoven's Fourth and Fifth Concertos. As Girdlestone (1964) notes, its departures from convention do not end with this early solo entrance, but continue in the style of dialogue between piano and orchestra in the rest of the movement. Mozart wrote two cadenzas for this movement. The second movement is written in a minor key. In only five of Mozart's piano concertos is the second movement in a minor key (K. 41, K. 271, K. 456, K. 482, and K. 488. K. 41 is an arrangement). Mozart wrote two cadenzas for this movement. The third movement ...
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time Dawn Chan notes: Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos." update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat Concerto. Twentieth-century accounts usually stated that Mozart composed it for a French keyboard virtuoso named Mademoiselle Jeunehomme, who visited Salzburg in the winter of 1777. Nothing else was known, not even the woman's first name. Last year, the Viennese musicologist Michael Lorenz, a specialist in the music of Mozart's and Schubert's time and a brilliant archival detective, figured out the mystery. The nickname was coined by the French scholars Théodore de Wyzewa and Georges de Saint-Foix in their classic early-20th-century study of the composer. As Lorenz explains, "Since one of their favorite names for Mozart was 'jeune homme' (young man), they presented this person as 'Mademoiselle Jeunehomme.'" In a September 1778 letter Mozart wrote to his father, he referred to three recent concertos, "one for the jenomy [K. 271], litzau [K. 246], and one in B-flat [K. 238]" that he was selling to a publisher. Leopold later called the first pianist "Madame genomai." (Spellings were often variable and phonetic at the time.) Lorenz has identified her as Victoire Jenamy, born in Strasbourg in 1749 and married to a rich merchant, Joseph Jenamy, in 1768. Victoire was the daughter of the celebrated dancer and choreographer Jean Georges Noverre (1727-1810), who was a good friend of Mozart's. He had choreographed a 1772 Milan production of Mozart's opera Lucio Silla and later commissioned the ballet Les Petits Riens for Paris. Although we still know little about Victoire Jenamy—she does not appear to have been a professional musician, though clearly Mozart admired her playing—Mozart's first great piano concerto can now rightly be called by its proper name: "Jenamy."
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, First Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, First Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time Dawn Chan notes: Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos." update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is ...
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, 2nd Mvt, Part 2 Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, 2nd Mvt, Part 2 Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear ...
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, Third Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, Third Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat ...
Mozart's Concerto no. 9 in E-flat major, K. 271 (First Movement)
Mozart's Concerto no. 9 in E-flat major, K. 271 (First Movement) Eldred Marshall conducts members of the Meadows Symphony Orchestra and Meridian String Quartet (Dallas) in Mozart's Piano Concerto no. 9 "Jenamy" (or "Jeunehomme"). Cadenzas are by E. Marshall.
Mozart - The best of (Part 1)
Mozart - The best of (Part 1) The songs are added in chronological order, as they are classified by the Köchel catalogue. 1. Symphony No. 25 in G minor, KV 183 - 1. Allegro con brio 2. Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat major KV 207 - 1 Allegro Moderato 3. Violin Concerto No. 3 in G major KV 216 - 3 Rondeau 4. Piano Concerto No. 9 in E flat major, KV 271 'Jeunehomme' 1. Allegro 5. Symphonie Nr. 31 D-Dur KV 297 Pariser Symphonie - Allegro 6. Concerto for Flute, Harp & Orchestra in C major KV 299 - 2 Andantino 7. Piano Sonata No. 11 in A Major KV 331- III. Alla Turca, allegretto 8. Serenade for 13 Wind Instruments in B flat major KV 361, Gran Partita - Adagio 9. Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola & Orchestra in E flat major K364; Allegro 10. Concerto in E-flat for Two Pianos, No. 10, KV 365 11. Die Entfuehrung aus dem Serail, K.384, I.6.1. Singt dem grossen Bassa Lieder [No.5 - Coro] 12. Horn Concerto in D major KV 412 - Rondo, allegro 13. Symphonie Nr. 36 C-Dur KV 425 Linzer Symphonie - Adagio Allegro Con Spirito 14. Great Mass in C minor KV 427 - Kyrie 15. Piano Concerto No. 15 in B flat major, KV 450 3. Allegro assai 16. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, KV 466 1. Allegro 17. Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor, KV 466 3. Allegro assai 18. Piano concerto No 21 in C major KV 467 Elvira Madigan 2- Andante 19. Piano Concerto No. 22 in E flat major, KV 482 3. Allegro 20. Le nozze di Figaro, K.492 - Overture [Presto, Andante con moto]
Mendelssohn's Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor (op. 25) 1 of 2 .wmv
Mendelssohn's Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor (op. 25) 1 of 2 .wmv soloist Miss Andreea Butnaru Conductor : Radu Postavaru Mendelssohn's Piano Concerto No. 1 in G minor (op. 25) was written in 18301, around the same time as his fourth symphony ("Italian"), and premiered in Munich in October 1831. He had already written a piano concerto in A minor with string accompaniment (1822) and two concertos with two pianos (18234). The three connected movements — Molto allegro con fuoco in G minor Andante in E major Presto—Molto allegro e vivace in G major use several relatively new formal techniques in their brief span — for example, the piano enters very soon after the opening of the first movement, with little of an orchestral tutti to contrast with.[1] The concerto quickly obtained popularity, and contains many sections of improvisation, one of Mendelssohn's specialities Molto allegro con fuoco The piano enters after only a few bars of orchestral introduction. It was standard procedure in the classical-era concerto to precede the solo's entrance by a tutti, for various reasons - and while the length and purpose of these introductions differed, some offering a hint of what was to follow and some giving out almost all the movement's material for example, none was so brief as this: in this sense, this was one of the first concertos of the Romantic age. (The obvious exceptions - Mozart's Jeunehomme concerto and Beethoven's fourth and fifth piano concertos - allowed the piano to enter very briefly just at the start, also for different reasons, but ...
YesNo