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Johannes Brahms -- YouTube Symphony Orchestra
Johannes Brahms -- YouTube Symphony Orchestra www.youtube.com/symphony The YouTube Symphony Orchestra performs Johannes Brahms - Allegro giocoso from Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op. 98 on April 15, 2009 @ Carnegie Hall. Selected by the YouTube community and several members of the world's most renowned orchestras, the YouTube Symphony Orchestra is made up of over 96 professional and amateur musicians from 30+ countries and territories on six continents and represents 26 different instruments.
DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n. 5 (Johannes Brahms).
DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n. 5 (Johannes Brahms). DAVID GARRETT - Hungarian Dance n.5 (Johannes Brahms). David Garrett (born as David Bongartz on September 4, 1980 ) is a record breaking German/American classical violinist and recording artist. Garrett was born in Aachen, Germany to an American prima ballerina and the German lawyer and jurist, Georg Peter Bongartz. He adopted his mother's maiden name as a pseudonym. Musical education When Garrett was four years old, his father bought a violin for his older brother. The young Garrett took an interest and soon learned to play. A year later, he took part in a competition and won first prize. By the age of seven, he was playing once a week in public. He studied violin at the Lübeck Conservatoire. At the age of 12, Garrett began working with the distinguished Polish violinist Ida Haendel, often traveling to London and other European cities to meet her. He continued his studies at the Royal College of Music in London. In 2004, he graduated from the Juilliard School in New York City and was one of the first students to study there with Itzhak Perlman. Career At the age of 13, Garrett recorded two CDs, appeared on German and Dutch television, and gave a concert in the residence of the Federal Republic of Germany President, the Villa Hammerschmidt, at Dr. von Weizsäcker's personal invitation. He was offered the use of the famous Stradivarius "San Lorenzo", which is among the best instruments of the "golden period". At the age of 14, as the youngest soloist ever, Garrett signed an ...
Johannes Brahms - Hungarian Dance No. 5
Johannes Brahms - Hungarian Dance No. 5 Johannes Brahms Hungarian Dance No. 5 in G minor The German composer, pianist, and conductor Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) was one of the most significant composers of the 19th century. His works greatly enriched the romantic repertory.
Johannes Brahms - Lullaby
Johannes Brahms - Lullaby Johannes Brahms - Op.49 No.4 Wiegenlied / Lullaby (original composition)
Johannes Brahms- Waltz
Johannes Brahms- Waltz Title : Johannes Brahms , Waltz for violin Date : 1865
Johannes Brahms, Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77, part 2 - Adagio
Johannes Brahms, Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77, part 2 - Adagio Johannes Brahms, Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77, part 2 - Adagio, Shlomo Mintz- violine, conductor: Maxim Eshkenazy, Classic FM M-Tel Orchestra, Bulgaria Hall, LIVE RECORDING
Johannes Brahms -- YouTube Symphony Orchestra
Johannes Brahms -- YouTube Symphony Orchestra www.youtube.com/symphony The YouTube Symphony Orchestra performs Johannes Brahms - Allegro giocoso from Symphony No.4 in E minor, Op. 98 on April 15, 2009 @ Carnegie Hall.Selected by the YouTube community and several members of the world's most renowned orchestras, the YouTube Symphony Orchestra is made up of over 96 professional and amateur musicians from 30+ countries and territories on six continents and represents 26 different instruments.
Johannes Brahms : Double Concerto in A Minor: III. Vivace non troppo
Johannes Brahms : Double Concerto in A Minor: III. Vivace non troppo The Double Concerto in A minor (Op. 102) by Johannes Brahms (7 May 1833 3 April 1897) is a concerto for violin, cello and orchestra. Composed in the summer of 1887, and first performed on 18 October of that year, it was Brahms' final work for orchestra. Brahms, approaching the project with anxiety over writing for instruments that were not his own, wrote it for the cellist Robert Hausmann and his old estranged friend, the violinist Joseph Joachim. The concerto was, in part, a gesture of reconciliation towards Joachim, after their long friendship had ruptured following Joachim's divorce from his wife Amalie. Brahms had sided with Amalie in the dispute, and this led to the estrangement between Brahms and Joachim. The Double Concerto acted as a form of musical reconciliation. The concerto also makes use of the musical motif AEF, a permutation of FAE, which stood for a personal motto of Joachim, frei aber einsam ("free but lonely").
Johannes Brahms--Hungarian Dance
Johannes Brahms--Hungarian Dance www.youtube.com www.encognitive.com The Hungarian Dances (German Ungarische Tänze) by Johannes Brahms (WoO 1), are a set of 21 lively dance tunes based mostly on Hungarian themes. Only numbers 11, 14 and 16 are entirely original compositions. They vary from about a minute to four minutes in length. They are among Brahms' most popular works, and were certainly the most profitable for him. Each dance has been arranged for a wide variety of instruments and ensembles. Brahms originally wrote the version for piano four-hands and later arranged the first 10 dances for solo piano. He wrote orchestral arrangements for No. 1, No. 3 and No. 10. Other composers, including Antonín Dvořák, orchestrated the other dances. The most famous Hungarian Dance is No. 5 in F♯ minor (G minor in the orchestral version). en.wikipedia.org
Guten Abend, Gute Nacht - Wiegenlied von Johannes Brahms - Lullaby f
Guten Abend, Gute Nacht - Wiegenlied von Johannes Brahms - Lullaby f Guten Abend gute Nacht von J. Brahms - Version von Daniel Westphal Good evening, good night - Lullabye for Julian für meinen Sohn Julian ! Guten Abend gute Nacht Text Guten Abend, gute Nacht mit Rosen bedacht mit Näglein besteckt Schlupf unter die Deck Morgen früh, wenn Gott will wirst du wieder geweckt Guten Abend, gute Nacht von Englein bewacht die zeigen im Traum dir Christkindleins Baum Schlaf nun seelig und süß schau ins Traum Paradies Text: Erste Strophe aus " Des Knaben Wunderhorn " - 1808 zweite Strophe von Georg Scherer - 1849 bzw Karl Simrock ? Musik: Johannes Brahms - 1868
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