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Mozart Sinfonia 41 Jupiter - VPO Bohm
Mozart Sinfonia 41 Jupiter - VPO Bohm Mozart Symphony no. 41 K. 551 "Jupiter" I. Allegro Vivace Wiener Philharmoniker - Karl Bohm
WA Mozart - "Jupiter" Symphony No. 41 in C major KV 551
WA Mozart - "Jupiter" Symphony No. 41 in C major KV 551 WA Mozart Symfonia nr 41 C-dur "Jowiszowa" KV 551/WA Mozart - "Jupiter" Symphony No. 41 in C major KV 551. Opera i Filharmonia Podlaska Europejskie Centrum Sztuki w Białymstoku/The Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic European Art Centre in Bialystok. Marcin Nałęcz-Niesiołowski - dyrygent/conductor. Orkiestra Opery i Filharmonii Podlaskiej/The Orchestra of the Podlasie Opera and Philharmonic. Muzyka klasyczna/classical music. Koncerty symfoniczne/symphonic concerts. www.oifp.pl lub 217.17.47.78
Mozart-Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter"/Leibowitz/Pt. 1 (of 3)
Mozart-Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter"/Leibowitz/Pt. 1 (of 3) Rare. Rene Leibowitz conducts The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (1962) Rene Leibowitz (1913-1972) was born in Warsaw but moved to Paris in his teens and there began a long, illustrious conducting career. Particularly interested in contemporary music, he studied with Webern and Schoenberg and wrote a detailed analysis of twelve-tone music. A keen ear for instrumental coloration (Ravel was his orchestration teacher) was evident in his kaleidoscopic transcriptions of such works as Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C (for double orchestra!). But he is best known for his often highly personal renditions of many staples of the Classical and Romantic repertoire. Here's Part 2 www.youtube.com
Mozart-Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter"/Leibowitz/Pt. 2 (of 3)
Mozart-Symphony No. 41 "Jupiter"/Leibowitz/Pt. 2 (of 3) Rare. Rene Leibowitz conducts The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (1962) Rene Leibowitz (1913-1972) was born in Warsaw but moved to Paris in his teens and there began a long, illustrious conducting career. Particularly interested in contemporary music, he studied with Webern and Schoenberg and wrote a detailed analysis of twelve-tone music. A keen ear for instrumental coloration (Ravel was his orchestration teacher) was evident in his kaleidoscopic transcriptions of such works as Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C (for double orchestra!). But he is best known for his often highly personal renditions of many staples of the Classical and Romantic repertoire. Here's Part 3 www.youtube.com
The Very Best of Mozart: Part 1
The Very Best of Mozart: Part 1 NOTE: To view in HD, click here: www.youtube.com Mozart is one of the greatest composers to have ever lived. Among his towering achievements are a few pieces that speak to me on a level I have never felt with any other composer, past or present. While this list is not definitive, and certainly no list is, it does touch on the broad spectrum of genres for which Mozart is most famous. I encourage you to find these pieces on your own and begin listening to them earnestly and patiently. I assure you, this music is unlike anything you have ever heard or will ever hear. You will be able to always find something new and startling even after a hundred listens. These pieces are classical in their very nature. Thus is the power of Mozart. The List (1-6) 1. Jupiter Symphony - Levine/Chicago Symphony Orchestra 2. Piano Concerto No. 20 - Bilson/Gardiner/English Baroque Soloists 3. The Abduction at the Seraglio - Gardiner/Monteverdi Choir 4. Symphony 40 in G Minor - Maazel/New York Philharmonic 5. Piano Sonata K.545 - Jean Bernard Pommier 6. Requiem in D Minor - Philippe Herreweghe/Orchestre des Champs Elysees
Sibelius Intermezzo Karelia Suite - Isao Tomita style
Sibelius Intermezzo Karelia Suite - Isao Tomita style By Paul Shillito www.classitronic.net Sibelius's Intermezzo from the Karelia Suite Op.11 classitronically recreated by yours truly. Classitronic is what I call electronic classical music with my style being heavily influenced by Isao Tomita This was an interesting piece because I remember it as the theme music to a TV documentary/current affairs series from the late 60's or early 70's, called This Week, I just loved the main sequence when it kicks in, so to give a kick I used a rather hard edged dance string sound and arpeggiated the strings to give a Tangerine Dream style sequence sound. The music was created using Malström, Thor, Minimoog V2, Jupiter 8V, Battery 3 and Omnisphere soft synths and arranged and mixed in Cubase 4. The graphic is a section of an image called "Piano wave" by James Allridge III. For more electronic classical music and not just mine go to www.classitronic.net
Mozart Symphony 41 K 551 - Molto Allegro
Mozart Symphony 41 K 551 - Molto Allegro Woody Allen once said that Mozart's Symphony 41 proved the existence of God. Certainly, a symphony of such grandness and scale had, until the summer of 1788, never before been seen in the musical universe. Its implications for the direction of music in the future, and its influence on future composers is immeasurable. What makes Mozart's Jupiter symphony worthy to share the name of the most powerful god of the Roman world? The answer to this question comes in the Molto Allegro, and more specifically in its coda, (8:09-8:36). In the coda, Mozart takes the five musical themes or melodies that had been developed throughout the final movement, and does something that no one has ever achieved to the extent that he did, not even the illustrious Beethoven. What Mozart does is take these five themes and combines them to create a fugato in five-part counterpoint. That is, he takes the five melodies and simultaneously plays them in a variety of combinations and permutations. Imagine five separate melodies, all with their own notes, being played simultaneously, but each constantly changing. It's impossible for the human ear to focus on the enormous amount of notes that this simultaneous playing and constant changing entails. The effect is that the music seems to encompass an infinite amount of sound. With lesser two or three-part fugues, it is occasionally possible to sense everything that is going on. Once you get to four voices, it's nearly impossible to detect all of the nuances.
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time Dawn Chan notes: Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos." update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat Concerto. Twentieth-century accounts usually stated that Mozart composed it for a French keyboard virtuoso named Mademoiselle Jeunehomme, who visited Salzburg in the winter of 1777. Nothing else was known, not even the woman's first name. Last year, the Viennese musicologist Michael Lorenz, a specialist in the music of Mozart's and Schubert's time and a brilliant archival detective, figured out the mystery. The nickname was coined by the French scholars Théodore de Wyzewa and Georges de Saint-Foix in their classic early-20th-century study of the composer. As Lorenz explains, "Since one of their favorite names for Mozart was 'jeune homme' (young man), they presented this person as 'Mademoiselle Jeunehomme.'" In a September 1778 letter Mozart wrote to his father, he referred to three recent concertos, "one for the jenomy [K. 271], litzau [K. 246], and one in B-flat [K. 238]" that he was selling to a publisher. Leopold later called the first pianist "Madame genomai." (Spellings were often variable and phonetic at the time.) Lorenz has identified her as Victoire Jenamy, born in Strasbourg in 1749 and married to a rich merchant, Joseph Jenamy, in 1768. Victoire was the daughter of the celebrated dancer and choreographer Jean Georges Noverre (1727-1810), who was a good friend of Mozart's. He had choreographed a 1772 Milan production of Mozart's opera Lucio Silla and later commissioned the ballet Les Petits Riens for Paris. Although we still know little about Victoire Jenamy—she does not appear to have been a professional musician, though clearly Mozart admired her playing—Mozart's first great piano concerto can now rightly be called by its proper name: "Jenamy."
Adele - Rolling in the Deep (Piano/Cello Cover)
Adele - Rolling in the Deep (Piano/Cello Cover) Want to become a Piano Guys founder? Click link for all the exciting details www.thepianoguys.com Be first to receive our Limited Edition PianoGuys album! (Youtube hits) here: www.thepianoguys.com Download from iTunes here itunes.apple.com Download on Amazon: www.amazon.com For this week's video we decided to challenge ourselves. We picked a pop tune at the top of the charts -- one that wouldn't be an obvious candidate for an instrumental cover. "Rolling in the Deep" jumped out at us. The writers, Paul Epworth and Adele, described it as a "dark blues-y gospel disco tune." What could be more challenging for a classically-trained cellist and pianist? We locked ourselves in the studio (ok, not literally) and began work on the introduction. It wasn't working. The end. Just kidding...:-) The song came alive when we found a destined matchup in the melody from Gustav Holst's classical piece "Jupiter"—a deep melody that rang out when layered on top of everything we were creating for this arrangement. To make a long studio-story short, it all came together after that. ALL sounds were created by acoustic & electric cellos (5 different cellos) and piano. By the time we were finished we had used 60 tracks. Here's a link to the VOCAL VERSION! www.youtube.com What song should we cover next? Leave a comment! Follow the Piano Guys at www.Facebook.com Follow Steven Sharp Nelson at www.Facebook.com Follow Jon Schmidt at www.Facebook.com Credits Rolling in the Deep written by Paul Epworth ...
[Arthaus 100402] OFFENBACH: Orphee aux enfers
[Arthaus 100402] OFFENBACH: Orphee aux enfers OFFENBACH: Orphee aux enfers (PAL) Jacques Offenbach ORPHÉE AUX ENFERS Orpheus - Alexandru Badea Eurycide -- Elizabeth Vidal Jupiter -- Dale Duesing Pluto / Artisteus -- Reinaldo Macias John Styx -- André Jung Public Opinion -- Désirée Meiser Juno -- Jacqueline Van Quaille Venus -- Michele Patzakis Cupid -- Maire- Noëlle De Callataÿ Diana -- Sonja Theodoridou Minerva -- Laurence Misonne Mercury -- Franck Cassard Cerberus -- Thomas Stache Théâtre de la Monnaie Chorus Rheinland-Pfalz State Philharmonic Orchestra Théâtre de la Monnaie Symphony Orchestra Patrick Davin, conductor Herbert Wernicke, stage director, set and costume design Recorded live from the Theatre de la Monnaie, Brussels, 1997. Bonus: - Arthhaus Musik Trailer Picture format: PAL 16:9 Sound format: PCM Stereo Region code: 2, 5 Menu languages: English, German, French, Spanish Subtitles: German, English, French, Spanish Running time: 143 mins No. of DVDs: 1 (DVD 9) www.naxos.com
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