[var.fbMeta;htmlconv=no]

[var.lang_video_categories]

    [var.popular_categories;htmlconv=no]
[var.message;htmlconv=no]
Ančerl conducts Prokofiev Symphony No. 1 in D Major, "Classical"
Ančerl conducts Prokofiev Symphony No. 1 in D Major, "Classical" I Sergei Prokofiev: Symphony No. 1 in D major, Classical, Op 25 I. Allegro II. Larghetto Cond.: Karel Ančerl Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Chopin - Étude Op. 10, No. 1 in C major "Waterfall"
Chopin - Étude Op. 10, No. 1 in C major "Waterfall" Étude Op. 10, No.1 in C major, composed by Frédéric Chopin, is a technical study in reach and arpeggios for the piano. It also focuses on stretching the fingers. Sometimes it is known as the "Waterfall" étude. It was composed in 1829, and first published in 1833, in France, Germany, and England. In a prefatory note to the 1916 Schirmer edition the American music critic James Huneker (18571921) compared the "hypnotic charm" that these "dizzy acclivities and descents exercise for eye as well as ear" to the frightening staircases in Giovanni Battista Piranesi's prints of the Carceri d'invenzione. Structure The work is executed at an Allegro tempo. The time-signature Common time is according to the first French, English, and German editions. Chopin's own manuscript reads Cut time. The right hand gauntlet consists entirely of broad arpeggios in semiquavers (sixteenth notes) on modulating scales. The left hand plays the deep melody in slow, droning octaves. The main difficulty of this piece is playing the etude accurately at its suggested tempo (quarter note equals 176). Given the lack of rests, the challenge lies in playing the entire etude accurately and uninterrupted, which requires extremely swift movement of the right hand and quick changes in octaves for the left hand.
S. Prokofiev – Piano Sonata No.1 Op.1 in f minor (Jamina Ger
S. Prokofiev – Piano Sonata No.1 Op.1 in f minor (Jamina Ger Jamina Gerl plays S. Prokofiev – Piano Sonata No.1 Op.1 in f minor
Niccolò Paganini - Caprice No. 24 in A minor ( Classical Guitar )
Niccolò Paganini - Caprice No. 24 in A minor ( Classical Guitar ) Caprice No. 24 in A minor is the final caprice of Niccolò Paganini's 24 Caprices, and a famous work for solo violin. The work, in the key of A minor, consists of a theme, 11 variations, and a finale. It is widely considered one of the most difficult pieces ever written for the solo violin. It requires many highly advanced techniques such as parallel octaves and rapid shifting covering many intervals, extremely fast scales and arpeggios including minor scales in thirds and tenths, left hand pizzicato, high positions, and quick string crossing. As a result, most violinists even after studying for many years still lack the technique required for such a demanding piece. Niccolò Paganini (27 October 1782 -- 27 May 1840) was an Italian violinist, violist, guitarist, and composer. He was one of the most celebrated violin virtuosi of his time, and left his mark as one of the pillars of modern violin technique. His Caprice No. 24 in A minor, Op. 1, is among the best known of his compositions, and has served as an inspiration for many prominent composers. Italiano: Niccolò Paganini, o Nicolò (Genova, 27 ottobre 1782 -- Nizza, 27 maggio 1840), è stato un violinista, compositore e chitarrista italiano. Continuatore della scuola italiana di Pietro Antonio Locatelli e di Gaetano Pugnani, è considerato uno fra i maggiori violinisti dell'Ottocento, sia per la padronanza dello strumento, sia per le innovazioni apportate in particolare allo staccato e al pizzicato. La sua attività di ...
A. Skrjabin – Etude Op.42 No.5 (Jamina Gerl)
A. Skrjabin – Etude Op.42 No.5 (Jamina Gerl) Jamina Gerl plays A. Skrjabin – Etude Op.42 No.5
Frédéric CHOPIN: Nocturne in C-sharp Minor (Op. Posth. no.20)
Frédéric CHOPIN: Nocturne in C-sharp Minor (Op. Posth. no.20) Chopin's Nocturne in C-sharp minor is one of my favourite pieces. I'm not going to play in a formal classical way, but I'll play it in my own style with a little bit special adjustment. Sorry if I make you disappointed. :) The volume may be too loud for some notes because the mic is inside the piano. I apologize if I make your ears have hard feeling. Hope you like it and thanks for watching. ^ v ^
Andor Földes plays Beethoven Sonata No.24, "À Thérèse"
Andor Földes plays Beethoven Sonata No.24, "À Thérèse" Piano Sonata No. 24 in F-sharp major, op.78, nicknamed "À Thérèse"; composed in 1809. Movements are: - Adagio cantabile, Allegro ma non troppo - Allegro vivace ~~~ Dedicatee of the sonata (composed some five years after Appassionata), Countess Theresa Brunszvik of Korompa was a member of the Hungarian nobility. She was the founder of nursery schools in Hungary, under the Austro-hungarian monarchy on July 1, 1828. Soon the pre-school institution became famous all over Hungary and in 1837, Friedrich Fröbel founded the first "kindergarten" in Germany. She launched the Women's Association in Buda and Pest and initiated an institution for educating women and consistently supported their equality. She was once thought of as a leading contender for being the composer's mysterious "Immortal Beloved". Yet by the time these enigmatic references to a lover had begun to appear in his correspondence and conversation books, Theresa had been out of his life for a couple of years and, indeed, it is she who seems to have been the more disappointed party when their relationship came to nothing in 1809. He, meanwhile, was more besotted with her widowed sister Josephine. Once Beethoven failed to respond to Theresa's love for him, she found solace in caring for disadvantaged children and survived to the age of 86. The composer nevertheless treasured the portrait she gave him on her departure, inscribed with the words : "To the unique genius, to the great artist, to the good man ...
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 21 - Andante
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Piano Concerto No. 21 - Andante Piano Concerto No. 21 - Andante "Elvira Madigan"
Géza Anda plays Chopin Polonaise No.6 "Heroique"
Géza Anda plays Chopin Polonaise No.6 "Heroique" Polonaise No.6 in A-flat major, op.53, composed in 1842. ~~~ Géza Anda (1921 - 1976) Hungarian pianist, born in Budapest. He studied with some of the renowned teachers of the 20th century such as Imre Stefaniai and Imre Keeri-Szanto, and became a pupil of Ernst von Dohnányi and Zoltán Kodály at the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest. Anda made his debut in 1939 in Budapest under Willem Mengelberg playing Brahms B flat major concerto, which would become his signature. In 1940 he won the Liszt Prize, and in the next year, he made an international name for himself with his performance of Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 2. In 1941, he also made his debut with the Berlin Philharmonic under Wilhelm Furtwängler, who dubbed him "troubadour of the piano." He remained in Berlin during the first years of World War II, but in 1942 he fled to Switzerland, where he encountered the great pianist and teacher Edwin Fischer. Fischer was a proponent of performing the Mozart piano concertos while conducting from the keyboard and Anda would later adopt this practice, adding bench-led performances of all the concertos (even the early ones) to his repertoire. He was among the first to explore the whole range of Mozart's concertos, at a time when only the "greatest hits" were heard in concert halls; his outstanding 1960's recordings of the complete cycle with the Camerata Academica of the Salzburg Mozarteum remain a milestone in the history of recorded music. Géza Anda's style was noteworthy for its ...
G. Ligeti - Etude No.5 “Arc en ciel” (Jamina Gerl)
G. Ligeti - Etude No.5 “Arc en ciel” (Jamina Gerl) Jamina Gerl plays G. Ligeti - Etude No.5 “Arc en ciel”
YesNo