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Pierre Hantaï plays D. Scarlatti
Pierre Hantaï plays D. Scarlatti Composed by: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) Played by: Pierre Hantaï Sonatas K535 and K371 ---------------------- Enjoy!
Pierre Fournier,Vivaldi Cello Concerto E minor (1/4)
Pierre Fournier,Vivaldi Cello Concerto E minor (1/4) www.facebook.com Pierre Fournier-violoncello, Festival Strings Lucerne, Rudolf Baumgartner. Pierre Fournier (1906-1986) was born in Paris on June 24, and known in his lifetime as "the aristocrat of cellists," because of his lyrical playing, and for his impeccable artistic sensitivity. Fournier was the son of a French army general, and as a child was taught piano by his mother. At the age of nine he suffered a mild case of polio, and lost some of the dexterity in his legs and feet. No longer able to master the use of the piano pedals, he searched for another musical instrument, and turned to the cello. He quickly made good progress on his new instrument, and was able to win entrance to the Paris Conservatoire, where he became a pupil of Paul Bazelaire, and later Anton Hekking. He graduated at the age of seventeen, in the year 1923. Maurice Marechal called him "the cellist of the future." Even at such a young age, Fournier had tremendous virtuosity, and was famous for his bowing facility. Fournier was a friend of another great French cellist, Tortelier. Once, meeting backstage after a recital by Tortelier, Pierre said to him, "Paul, I wish I had your left hand." Tortelier replied, "Pierre, I wish I had your right arm!" Fournier became well known in 1925 after a successful performance with the Edouard Colonne Orchestra in Paris, and began to give concerts all over Europe. Fournier played with all the great musicians of his time, including Cortot, Thibaud, Furtwangler ...
Serge Prokofiev : Pierre et le Loup (1936), transcription pour piano
Serge Prokofiev : Pierre et le Loup (1936), transcription pour piano Serge Prokofiev (1891-1953) (Russie) Pierre et le Loup (1936), transcription libre pour piano par Tatania Nikolayeva 1/2 1- Peter (4.03) 2- L'oiseau (0.26) 3- Le Canard (3.26) 4- Le Chat (1.50) Célèbre interprète de Dmitri Shostakovitch, la pianiste Tatania Nikolayeva (1924-1993) déploie dans son interprétation-recréation du conte musical « Pierre et le Loup » (1936) de Sergei Prokofiev une implacable virtuosité qui ne laisse place à aucun sentimentalisme. Cet excès est, selon l'auditeur, une qualité inoubliable ou un défaut frustrant. On peut aussi écouter sur collectionCB, de Sergei Prokofiev, ses « Four Portraits and a Denouement » (1931), suite pour orchestre arrangée de son opéra « The Gambler ». LIST OF THE UPLOADS OF COLLECTIONCB/LISTE DES MISES EN LIGNE DE COLLECTIONCB : knol.google.com
Pierre Fournier Haydn Cello Concerto in D 1.(2/2) live
Pierre Fournier Haydn Cello Concerto in D 1.(2/2) live www.facebook.com Pierre Fournier (1906-1986) was born in Paris on June 24, and known in his lifetime as "the aristocrat of cellists," because of his lyrical playing, and for his impeccable artistic sensitivity. Fournier was the son of a French army general, and as a child was taught piano by his mother. At the age of nine he suffered a mild case of polio, and lost some of the dexterity in his legs and feet. No longer able to master the use of the piano pedals, he searched for another musical instrument, and turned to the cello. He quickly made good progress on his new instrument, and was able to win entrance to the Paris Conservatoire, where he became a pupil of Paul Bazelaire, and later Anton Hekking. He graduated at the age of seventeen, in the year 1923. Maurice Marechal called him "the cellist of the future." Even at such a young age, Fournier had tremendous virtuosity, and was famous for his bowing facility. Fournier was a friend of another great French cellist, Tortelier. Once, meeting backstage after a recital by Tortelier, Pierre said to him, "Paul, I wish I had your left hand." Tortelier replied, "Pierre, I wish I had your right arm!" Fournier became well known in 1925 after a successful performance with the Edouard Colonne Orchestra in Paris, and began to give concerts all over Europe. Fournier played with all the great musicians of his time, including Cortot, Thibaud, Furtwangler, Karajan and Kubelik. Together with Artur Schnabel, Szigeti and Primrose he ...
Pierre Fournier Haydn Cello Concerto in D 1.(1/2) live
Pierre Fournier Haydn Cello Concerto in D 1.(1/2) live www.facebook.com Pierre Fournier (1906-1986) was born in Paris on June 24, and known in his lifetime as "the aristocrat of cellists," because of his lyrical playing, and for his impeccable artistic sensitivity. Fournier was the son of a French army general, and as a child was taught piano by his mother. At the age of nine he suffered a mild case of polio, and lost some of the dexterity in his legs and feet. No longer able to master the use of the piano pedals, he searched for another musical instrument, and turned to the cello. He quickly made good progress on his new instrument, and was able to win entrance to the Paris Conservatoire, where he became a pupil of Paul Bazelaire, and later Anton Hekking. He graduated at the age of seventeen, in the year 1923. Maurice Marechal called him "the cellist of the future." Even at such a young age, Fournier had tremendous virtuosity, and was famous for his bowing facility. Fournier was a friend of another great French cellist, Tortelier. Once, meeting backstage after a recital by Tortelier, Pierre said to him, "Paul, I wish I had your left hand." Tortelier replied, "Pierre, I wish I had your right arm!" Fournier became well known in 1925 after a successful performance with the Edouard Colonne Orchestra in Paris, and began to give concerts all over Europe. Fournier played with all the great musicians of his time, including Cortot, Thibaud, Furtwangler, Karajan and Kubelik. Together with Artur Schnabel, Szigeti and Primrose he ...
Pierre Fournier,Vivaldi Cello Concerto E minor (3/4)
Pierre Fournier,Vivaldi Cello Concerto E minor (3/4) www.facebook.com Pierre Fournier-violoncello, Festival Strings Lucerne, Rudolf Baumgartner. Pierre Fournier (1906-1986) was born in Paris on June 24, and known in his lifetime as "the aristocrat of cellists," because of his lyrical playing, and for his impeccable artistic sensitivity. Fournier was the son of a French army general, and as a child was taught piano by his mother. At the age of nine he suffered a mild case of polio, and lost some of the dexterity in his legs and feet. No longer able to master the use of the piano pedals, he searched for another musical instrument, and turned to the cello. He quickly made good progress on his new instrument, and was able to win entrance to the Paris Conservatoire, where he became a pupil of Paul Bazelaire, and later Anton Hekking. He graduated at the age of seventeen, in the year 1923. Maurice Marechal called him "the cellist of the future." Even at such a young age, Fournier had tremendous virtuosity, and was famous for his bowing facility. Fournier was a friend of another great French cellist, Tortelier. Once, meeting backstage after a recital by Tortelier, Pierre said to him, "Paul, I wish I had your left hand." Tortelier replied, "Pierre, I wish I had your right arm!" Fournier became well known in 1925 after a successful performance with the Edouard Colonne Orchestra in Paris, and began to give concerts all over Europe. Fournier played with all the great musicians of his time, including Cortot, Thibaud, Furtwangler ...
Pierre Monteux conducts Stravinsky (vaimusic.com)
Pierre Monteux conducts Stravinsky (vaimusic.com) vaimusic.com Pierre Monteux conducts "People's Fair at Shrovetide" from Petrouchka (Igor Stravinsky) (excerpt) From: VAI DVD 4316 Pierre Monteux: Boston Symphony Orchestra Brahms, Hindemith, Stravinsky The beloved French conductor was closely associated with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, but only one of his performances with the orchestra has been preserved on film. In this 1959 telecast, Monteux conducts the music of Brahms (Tragic Overture), Hindemith (Noblissima Visione) and Stravinsky. The Stravinsky work, Petrouchka, premiered in its original form as a ballet, in Paris, in 1911. Monteux was the conductor for that world premiere, hence this video has particular historical significance. Approx. 82 min., B&W, mono. TO PURCHASE THE COMPLETE DVD, PLEASE VISIT www.vaimusic.com OR CALL TOLL-FREE IN THE US 1(800)477-7146 (OUTSIDE OF THE US, CALL 914-769-3691)
Pierre Fournier,Vivaldi Cello Concerto E minor (2/4)
Pierre Fournier,Vivaldi Cello Concerto E minor (2/4) www.facebook.com Pierre Fournier-violoncello, Festival Strings Lucerne, Rudolf Baumgartner. Pierre Fournier (1906-1986) was born in Paris on June 24, and known in his lifetime as "the aristocrat of cellists," because of his lyrical playing, and for his impeccable artistic sensitivity. Fournier was the son of a French army general, and as a child was taught piano by his mother. At the age of nine he suffered a mild case of polio, and lost some of the dexterity in his legs and feet. No longer able to master the use of the piano pedals, he searched for another musical instrument, and turned to the cello. He quickly made good progress on his new instrument, and was able to win entrance to the Paris Conservatoire, where he became a pupil of Paul Bazelaire, and later Anton Hekking. He graduated at the age of seventeen, in the year 1923. Maurice Marechal called him "the cellist of the future." Even at such a young age, Fournier had tremendous virtuosity, and was famous for his bowing facility. Fournier was a friend of another great French cellist, Tortelier. Once, meeting backstage after a recital by Tortelier, Pierre said to him, "Paul, I wish I had your left hand." Tortelier replied, "Pierre, I wish I had your right arm!" Fournier became well known in 1925 after a successful performance with the Edouard Colonne Orchestra in Paris, and began to give concerts all over Europe. Fournier played with all the great musicians of his time, including Cortot, Thibaud, Furtwangler ...
Jean-Pierre Rampal plays Mozart (vaimusic.com)
Jean-Pierre Rampal plays Mozart (vaimusic.com) vaimusic.com Jean-Pierre Rampal plays III. "Rondo" (Tempo di Menuetto) from Flute Concerto No. 1 in G major, K.313 (Mozart) From: VAI DVD 4227 The Art of Jean-Pierre Rampal Televised February 24, 1966 Radio-Canada Telecasts 1956-1966 117 min. B&W TO PURCHASE THE COMPLETE DVD, PLEASE VISIT www.vaimusic.com OR CALL TOLL-FREE IN THE US 1(800)477-7146 (OUTSIDE OF THE US, CALL 914-769-3691).
GF Händel. (1/2) Organ Concerto Op 7, No 1. Marie-Claire Alain.
GF Händel. (1/2) Organ Concerto Op 7, No 1. Marie-Claire Alain. Marie-Claire Alain, Organ. Eglise Saint-Pierre des Chartreux, Toulouse. Movements: 'Andante' and 'Andante à trois temps'. Freiburger Barockorchester, Gottfried von der Goltz conducting. Organ by Robert Delauney dating from 1677-1682. Enlarged by Isnard in 1760. Fully restored as French Classical organ by Grenzing in 1982. Most of the pipework dates from the 17th and 18th century. Both the organ and the organ case are classified as ''Monuments historiques''. Photos: Eglise and the Organ of St. Pierre des Chartreux, Toulouse
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