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Ronald Brautigam debut LP Schumann piano sonata nr2 in g op.22 origi
Ronald Brautigam debut LP Schumann piano sonata nr2 in g op.22 origi This is the first LP Ronald Brautigam ever made. It was recorded by the legendary Dutch record producer Klaas A Posthuma (1935-2001) who later would found the classical label "Globe". This is the original version of Robert Schumann's second pianosonata op 22 in g minor. First movement: So Rasch wie Möglich I de-clicked and eq-ed the record myself. For more classical mp3's, take a look at by blog with the Dutch Radio 4. It's in Dutch, but at the bottom of the pages are my transfers of pre 1958 Lp's. Please write on the blog what you think of the recordings! www.radio4.nl www.radio4.nl www.radio4.nl www.radio4.nl www.radio4.nl www.radio4.nl
Jack Gibbons plays Alkan Concerto for solo piano (1st mvt)
Jack Gibbons plays Alkan Concerto for solo piano (1st mvt) Jack Gibbons plays the first movement (complete) of Alkan's Concerto for solo piano.

The monumental Concerto for Solo Piano makes up Etudes 8-10 of Charles-Valentin Alkan's 'Douze Etudes dans les Tons Mineurs' (Twelve Studies in the Minor Keys), Alkan's magnum opus, published in 1857. The Concerto for solo piano has been described as a musical epic and as one of the most original works of its century, and contains some of Alkans finest and most haunting music. As the title of the work suggests, Alkan recreates the massive and contrasting sounds of both piano and orchestra through just one pair of hands (the entry of the solo pianist, following the 'orchestral' exposition, is obvious from the rising sweep of a pianistic scale). The gigantic proportions of the first movement are superbly controlled in Alkans masterly construction, the contrasting mixture of excitement and tenderness, ferocity and lyricism being held together in a model of coherence and logical progression.

Jack Gibbons made his London debut in 1979, at the age of 17, performing the Alkan Concerto for solo piano. A year earlier, at the age of 16, he had given only the second ever performance in history of the complete Concerto (Ronald Smith gave the first ever complete performance of the work the previous year, 1977). In 1995 Jack Gibbons became the first pianist to perform the entire three and a half hour 'Douze Etudes dans les Tons Mineurs' of Alkan in a single concert.

For more information on Jack Gibbons visit his official website at http://www.jackgibbons.com
Alkan - Scherzo Diabolico
Alkan - Scherzo Diabolico "Scherzo Diabolico, anticipates Liszt's 'Mephisto' style but is more classical in shape and sterner in character. Although in G minor its leading subject opens with a bold splash of Ab colouring and throughout the main section this constant contradiction of G minor by the Neapolitan sixth, Ab, adds tension to its obsessional drive. The tempo slackens for a trio in huge fat chords. Then comes the surprise. The scherzo returns but in a breathless whisper and it vanishes, wraithlike, into a sulphurous haze of pedal. Alkan's instruction to hold both pedals throughout this final section is highly imaginative but cruelly exacting, especially on most modern instruments. It should certainly be risked, its success depending on the pianist's ability to tame such wide-spanned velocity into a controlled 'ppp'." *All quotes taken from Ronald Smith's book entitled Alkan - The man, The Music.*
Haydn - Sonata No.50 in D major Hob.XVI:37 - 1.mvnt, with sheet
Haydn - Sonata No.50 in D major Hob.XVI:37 - 1.mvnt, with sheet Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) Sonata for Piano No.50 in D major Hob.XVI:37 - 1.movement With score and without repeating Ronald Brautigam (fortepiano)
Jack Gibbons plays Alkan Concerto for solo piano (3rd mvt)
Jack Gibbons plays Alkan Concerto for solo piano (3rd mvt) Jack Gibbons plays the third movement of Alkan's Concerto for solo piano.

The monumental Concerto for Solo Piano makes up Etudes 8-10 of Charles-Valentin Alkan's 'Douze Etudes dans les Tons Mineurs' (Twelve Studies in the Minor Keys), Alkan's magnum opus, published in 1857. The Concerto for solo piano has been described as a musical epic and as one of the most original works of its century, and contains some of Alkans finest and most haunting music. As the title of the work suggests, Alkan recreates the massive and contrasting sounds of both piano and orchestra through just one pair of hands. The exuberant finale, with its kaleidoscope of moods, Eastern flavour, and exhilarating peroration, rounds off this massive work to perfection.

Jack Gibbons made his London debut in 1979, at the age of 17, performing the Alkan Concerto for solo piano. A year earlier, at the age of 16, he had given only the second ever performance in history of the complete Concerto (Ronald Smith gave the first ever complete performance of the work the previous year, 1977). In 1995 Jack Gibbons became the first pianist to perform the entire three and a half hour 'Douze Etudes dans les Tons Mineurs' of Alkan in a single concert.

For more information on Jack Gibbons visit his official website at http://www.jackgibbons.com
Beethoven Fur Elise - Bagatelle in A minor - Piano
Beethoven Fur Elise - Bagatelle in A minor - Piano visit my webpage - www.joolsscott.co.uk "Für Elise" (German for "For Elise") is the popular name of the bagatelle in A minor WoO 59, marked poco moto, a piece of music for solo piano by Ludwig van Beethoven, dated 27 April 1810. Beethoven scholars are not entirely certain who "Elise" was. The most reasonable theory is that Beethoven originally titled his work "Für Therese", Therese being Therese Malfatti von Rohrenbach zu Dezza (1792-1851), whom Beethoven intended to marry in 1810. However, she declined Beethoven's proposal. In 1816 Therese, who was the daughter of the Viennese merchant Jacob Malfatti von Rohrenbach (1769-1829), married the Austrian nobleman and state official Wilhelm von Droßdik (1771-1859). When the work was published in 1865, the discoverer of the piece Ludwig Nohl mistranscribed the illegible title as "Für Elise". The autograph is lost. The piece begins 3 with a right-hand theme accompanied by arpeggios in the left hand; the harmonies used are A minor and E major. The next section maintains the same texture, but broadens the chord progression to include C major and G major. A lighter section follows, written in the key of F major, then a few bars in C major. The first section returns without alteration; next, the piece moves into an agitated theme set over a pedal point on A. After a gauntlet of arpeggios, the main theme returns, and the piece quietly ends in its starting key of A minor, with an Authentic Cadence. Adelaide (Beethoven) An die ferne ...
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