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Rossini Barber of Seville Fantasie for Piano 6 hands at Classical Un
Rossini Barber of Seville Fantasie for Piano 6 hands at Classical Un Pepi Pilibossian, Mikael Oganes and Harout Senekeremian perform Rossini's Barber of Seville Fantasie as arranged for Piano 6 Hands by D. Krug, at Classical Underground in Los Angeles, 10-25-10
Rossini - The Barber of Seville - Figaros Aria
Rossini - The Barber of Seville - Figaros Aria The Barber of Seville, or The Useless Precaution (Il barbiere di Siviglia, ossia L'inutile precauzione) is an opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with a libretto (based on Pierre Beaumarchais's comedy Le Barbier de Seville) by Cesare Sterbini. The overture, first written for Aureliano in Palmira, is a famous instance of Rossini's characteristic Italian style.
-Galina Vale -classical guitar / "Tarantella" G.Rossini
-Galina Vale -classical guitar / "Tarantella" G.Rossini Galina Vale / "TARANTELLA" G.Rossini-J.Morel www.myspace.com
Rossini - Overture from the "Barber of Seville"
Rossini - Overture from the "Barber of Seville" Gioachino Antonio Rossini (1792 - 1868) "The Barber of Seville", or "The Useless Precaution" ("Il barbiere di Siviglia, ossia L'inutile precauzione") is an opera buffa in two acts by Gioachino Rossini with a libretto (based on Beaumarchais's comedy Le Barbier de Séville) by Cesare Sterbini. The overture, first written for "Aureliano in Palmira", is a famous example of Rossini's characteristic Italian style. The première (under the title Almaviva, or the Useless Precaution) took place on February 20, 1816, at the Teatro Argentina, Rome.
Gioachino Rossini - Otello - "Assisa a pie d'un salice" (Frederic
Gioachino Rossini - Otello - "Assisa a pie d'un salice" (Frederic Finally, the most important woman in Rossini's life - mezzo-soprano Isabella Colbran - has an opportunity to enchant us. If we were to choose "a crown jewel" of Barbaja's and Rossini's cast, the choice would be all to obvious: Isabella Colbran. She was one of the first in a line of brilliant dramatic singers that would bless belcanto operas for decades: Pasta, Grisi, de Bengis, Malibran... She appeared in ten Rossini operas, and the love that formed between the primadonna and the maestro is evident in every page of the scores. Except for the rather bland character of Zoraide in "Ricciardo" and, possibly, Zelmira, all roles are incredibly dramatic: Armida and Ermione are anti-heroines, in spite of their tragic situations; Fiorilla is a comic role of unusual proportions; Elcia, Anna, Elena and Desdemona, in spite of being ingenue-like characters, are faced with staggeringly complex situations (indeed, only Elena gets a happy ending, while Anna commits suicide, Elcia's lover is killed before her eyes and Desdemona is killed by Otello); even the less interesting characters of Elisabetta and Semiramide require an unlimited amount of charisma. Although the label "soprano" is often used when describing Colbran's voice, Rossini's music speaks otherwise: she is regularly asked to go down to A flat and even G, while high notes rarely go beyond B; though additions aren't really prohibited, so Colbran roles are essayed by both sopranos and mezzos without any real threat to the music ...
Gioachino Rossini - Concert Aria (1813) - "Alle voci della gloria"
Gioachino Rossini - Concert Aria (1813) - "Alle voci della gloria" This virtuoso scene for bass and orchestra, "Alle voci della gloria", a typical "aria di baule" or "suitcase aria" (meaning arias that singers in the nineteenth century carried around with them, should a need arise to sing a piece of suitable demands; sometimes literally in a suitcase :D), generally supposed to have been written by Rossini in 1813 for Filippo Grimani, a Venetian patron, is something of an enigma in the list of Rossini's works, and has a decidedly troubled modern life. It was considered not so long ago (and interpolated as such) as an insertion aria for the completely-sololess Blansac from one of Rossini first operas, "La scala di seta". But there are several signs that, as Philip Gossett rightly points out in his book on performing belcanto, overturn a possibility of Rossini actually considering such an insertion: first off all, we have the text, worthy of opera seria, speaking of a languishing lover, completely lost in his desire to see his beloved again, though the cabaletta is set in a more hopeful mood; then, there is the rich orchestration which includes instruments - trumpets, trombones and percussion - that are actually absent from the earlier opera itself; the level of virtuosity that is asked throughout also seems alien to the comprimario from the farse; finally, there is a question of musical balance, Blansac does not actually need an aria, as it would destroy the balance of the opera where half of the numbers are already traditionally set as ...
La Cenerentola - G Rossini - Questo è un nodo avvilupatto
La Cenerentola - G Rossini - Questo è un nodo avvilupatto Gioachino Rossini - " La Cenerentola" Acto 2 - Scene 2 21-Questo è un nodo avvilupatto Magnifico ( Enzo Dara ), Tisbe (Jill Grove), Clorinda ( Laura Knoop ) , Cenerenterola ( Cecilia Bartoli ), Ramiro ( Raúl Giménez ), Dandini ( Alessandro Corbelli ) Houston Grand Opera - Directed for video by Brian Large Music DirectorChristoph Eschenbach Houston Grand Opera Corus Bruno Campanella
Gioachino Rossini - La scala di seta - Ouverture
Gioachino Rossini - La scala di seta - Ouverture Two full comic operas notwithstanding, the beginning of Rossini's career is best represented by a continuous succession of five one act operas or farsas, as Rossini himself described them: "La cambiale di matrimonio", "L'inganno felice", "La scala di seta", "L'occasione fa il ladro" (only this piece is designated by the composer as a "burletta" but the nature of the work gives us an opportunity to consider it an important part of this quintet of operas) and "Il signor Bruschino". All these works are also closely connected by the fact that they follow the same basic form with just a few variations. Structurally, all the first five operas share several obligatory elements: a lively overture; an introduction, usually limited to just three singers; arias for the main quartet of bass, baritone (or another bass), soprano and tenor (though one of these can be skipped); a central ensemble which feels almost as a first act finale, if the opera was just an hour longer (a terzet (in three operas), quartet or sextet); duets for two basses, tenor and soprano or soprano and bass; a long finale during which the plot reaches its' climax but all things invariably end happily. Usually the pieces are composed of just eight numbers, amounting to about an hour of music, only in "L'occasione" do we get eleven (mainly, because of two arias for the soprano). Moreover, all operas, in spite of being designated as "farsas" which, arguably, they are to a great extent, feature a very strong ...
ROSSINI The Italian Girl in Algiers
ROSSINI The Italian Girl in Algiers Ploiesti Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor: Romeo Rimbu. L'italiana in Algeri (The Italian Girl in Algiers) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini to an Italian libretto by Angelo Anelli, based on his earlier text set by Luigi Mosca. Rossini wrote L'Italiana in Algeri when he was 21. The opera was composed in either 18 or 27 days, depending on which source one believes (Rossini, not surprisingly, pegged it at 18). The opera is notable for Rossini's mixing of opera seria style in opera buffa. The overture is widely recorded and performed today, known for its distinct opening of slow, quiet pizzicato basses, leading to a sudden loud burst of sound from the full orchestra. This "surprise" hearkens an early admiration for Joseph Haydn, whose Symphony No. 94 in G major, "The Surprise Symphony", is so named for the same shocking, semi-comic affect.
Gioachino Rossini's complete 'William Tell Overture' played by Pe
Gioachino Rossini's complete 'William Tell Overture' played by Pe www.facebook.com/petelashleymusic www.petelashley.com This version of Rossini's 'William Tell Overture' is from Pete Lashley's 2010 album 'It All Comes Round'. The album is now available on ITUNES. It was recorded at Stonegate Studios in Bentham, North Yorkshire by Sam Parkinson (www.samesevennotes.co.uk). Four movements make up Rossini's 'William Tell Overture'. Pete Lashley plays them all on acoustic guitars,sometimes double-tracked and more occasionally triple tracked. It begins with the 'Prelude' - a slow passage originally written by Rossini for the cello. Pete detunes his guitar for the first few notes to try and capture the deeper mood created in the original composition. It's interesting to note that William Tell was a revolutionary against 14th Century Austrian oppression in states of the Swiss confederacy. This deep mood of the prelude, representing dawn over the forbidding mountains, could be seen to represent both a pastoral beauty and the oppressed atmosphere in which the Swiss were forced to live under Austrian dictatorship. The second movement is the 'Storm'. Up to four layers of acoustic guitars are used in this section by Lashley, all of which are playing their own distinct roles to capture the drama. The gentle bird call heard as the storm abates is sublime. Lashley plucks high pitch notes to emulate Rossini's original flute. The third movement, Ranz des Vaches (call to the dairy cows), originally featuring the English horn and flute, signifies daybreak ...
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