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Friedrich Kuhlau: Sonata in A Major
Friedrich Kuhlau: Sonata in A Major Megan Vamos closes out the April 24, 2008 Strathroy United Church service by performing Friedrich Kuhlau's Sonata in A Major on the Boston grand piano. Friedrich Daniel Rudolf Kuhlau (September 11, 1786 -- March 12, 1832) was a German-Danish composer during the Classical and Romantic periods. Born in Germany, after losing his right eye in a street accident at the age of seven, he studied piano in Hamburg. His father, grandfather, and uncle were military oboists. Even though Kuhlau was born to a poor family, his parents managed to pay for pianoforte lessons. In 1810, he fled to Copenhagen to avoid conscription in the Napoleonic Army, which overwhelmed the many small principalities and duchies of northern Germany, and in 1813 he became a Danish citizen. Outside of several lengthy trips which he took, he resided there until his death. During his lifetime, he was known primarily as a concert pianist and composer of Danish opera, but was responsible for introducing many of Beethoven's works, which he greatly admired, to Copenhagen audiences. Considering that his house burned down destroying all of his unpublished manuscripts, he was a prolific composer leaving more than 200 published works in most genres. Beethoven, whom Kuhlau knew personally, exerted the greatest influence upon his music. Interestingly, few of Beethoven's contemporaries showed greater understanding or ability to assimilate what he was doing than Kuhlau. Certainly with regard to form, Kuhlau was clearly able ...
Jeremiah Clarke: Trumpet Voluntary
Jeremiah Clarke: Trumpet Voluntary Edith Hanselman, music director and organist of Strathroy United Church, performs Jeremiah Clarke's famous "Trumpet Voluntary" as the organ postlude to conclude the June 1, 2008 Sunday service. Jeremiah Clarke (c. 1674 - December 1, 1707) was an English baroque composer. Thought to have been born in London in 1674, Clarke was a pupil of John Blow at St Paul's Cathedral. He later became organist at the Chapel Royal. "A violent and hopeless passion for a very beautiful lady of a rank superior to his own" caused him to commit suicide by shooting himself. Before shooting himself, he also considered hanging himself and drowning himself. He was succeeded in his post by William Croft. Clarke is now best remembered for the popular keyboard piece attributed to him, the Prince of Denmark's March, commonly called the Trumpet Voluntary and attributed for a long time to Henry Purcell. The famous Trumpet Tune in D, also misattributed to Purcell, is actually taken from the semi-opera The Island Princess, a joint musical production of Clarke and Daniel Purcell (Henry Purcell's younger brother), which is probably the reason for the confusion. Trumpet Voluntary is the title of several English keyboard pieces from the Baroque era. Most commonly played on the organ (they are utilizing the trumpet stop, hence the name), they generally consist of a slow introduction followed by a flamboyant faster section with the right hand playing fanfare-like figures over a simple accompaniment in the left ...
Little Fugue in G minor - BWV 578 - J.S. Bach
Little Fugue in G minor - BWV 578 - J.S. Bach Organist Edith Hanselman performs J.S. Bach's famous Little Fugue in G minor.
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