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Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time Dawn Chan notes: Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos." update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat Concerto. Twentieth-century accounts usually stated that Mozart composed it for a French keyboard virtuoso named Mademoiselle Jeunehomme, who visited Salzburg in the winter of 1777. Nothing else was known, not even the woman's first name. Last year, the Viennese musicologist Michael Lorenz, a specialist in the music of Mozart's and Schubert's time and a brilliant archival detective, figured out the mystery. The nickname was coined by the French scholars Théodore de Wyzewa and Georges de Saint-Foix in their classic early-20th-century study of the composer. As Lorenz explains, "Since one of their favorite names for Mozart was 'jeune homme' (young man), they presented this person as 'Mademoiselle Jeunehomme.'" In a September 1778 letter Mozart wrote to his father, he referred to three recent concertos, "one for the jenomy [K. 271], litzau [K. 246], and one in B-flat [K. 238]" that he was selling to a publisher. Leopold later called the first pianist "Madame genomai." (Spellings were often variable and phonetic at the time.) Lorenz has identified her as Victoire Jenamy, born in Strasbourg in 1749 and married to a rich merchant, Joseph Jenamy, in 1768. Victoire was the daughter of the celebrated dancer and choreographer Jean Georges Noverre (1727-1810), who was a good friend of Mozart's. He had choreographed a 1772 Milan production of Mozart's opera Lucio Silla and later commissioned the ballet Les Petits Riens for Paris. Although we still know little about Victoire Jenamy—she does not appear to have been a professional musician, though clearly Mozart admired her playing—Mozart's first great piano concerto can now rightly be called by its proper name: "Jenamy."
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, First Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, First Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time Dawn Chan notes: Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos." update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is ...
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, 2nd Mvt, Part 2 Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, 2nd Mvt, Part 2 Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear ...
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, Third Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 9, Third Mvt, Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat ...
No.2 Grieg : Violin Sonata No.3 Op.45 1st mov.- Mitsuko Ito Violin R
No.2 Grieg : Violin Sonata No.3 Op.45 1st mov.- Mitsuko Ito Violin R 伊藤光湖公式サイト / Mitsuko Ito Official Website mitsukoitoviolinrecital.web.fc2.com グリーグ : ヴァイオリンソナタ第3番作品45 第1楽章MitsukoIto Violin Recital at Chieria Hall in Sapporo Japan, 3 September 2010. Vn Mitsuko Ito Pf : Tomoko Asai 2010年9月3日ちえりあ伊藤光湖ヴァイオリンリサイタルよりVn : 伊藤光湖 Pf : 浅井智子Copyright (c) Mitsuko Ito - All Rights Reserved. www.cdbaby.com
Josef Suk & Rudolf Firkusny play Dvorak (vaimusic.com)
Josef Suk & Rudolf Firkusny play Dvorak (vaimusic.com) vaimusic.com Josef Suk (violin) & Rudolf Firkusny (piano) play Dvorak: Sonatina for Violin and Piano ("Indian Lament"), B. 183 (Op. 100) Second movement - Larghetto From: VAI DVD 4405 Works for Violin & Piano Two illustrious Czech artists with unique musical connections to two of the composers on the program: Firkušný studied composition with Leoš Janácek, and Josef Suk is the great-grandson of Antonín Dvorák. The famed violinist and pianist perform Dvorák: Sonatina for Violin and Piano in G Major, Janácek: Sonata for Violin and Piano, Brahms: Violin Sonata No. 3 in D minor, and Beethoven: Violin Sonata No.10 in G Major. Recorded in Dvorák Hall of the Rudolfinum, Prague, on May 18, 1992. Color, stereo, 74 min. TO PURCHASE THE COMPLETE DVD, GO TO www.vaimusic.com OR CALL TOLL-FREE IN THE US 1 (800) 477-7146 (OUTSIDE OF THE US, CALL 914-769-3691).
Quinteto BrassUka - Canzona per Sonare No. 4 (G. Gabrieli)
Quinteto BrassUka - Canzona per Sonare No. 4 (G. Gabrieli) Trecho da Canzona per Sonare No. 4 no concerto realizado no Teatro do Colégio Humboldt em Novembro de 2011
Storm by Yanni Cello Violin Best Ever HQ based on Antonio Vivaldi's
Storm by Yanni Cello Violin Best Ever HQ based on Antonio Vivaldi's Yanni Live show hq hd Yanni Samvel Yervinyan (Violin) Sayaka Katsuki (violin) Alexander Zhiroff (Cello) classical music violin piano orchestra symphony Alexander Zhiroff (Russia) cello Samvel Yervinyan (Armenia) violin Sayaka Katsuki (Japan) violin "The Storm" (based on Antonio Vivaldi's 18th century violin concerto "Summer" from The Four Seasons) Yanni (born Yiannis Hrysomallis (pronounced Chrysomallis), (Greek: Γιάννης Χρυσομάλλης, classical transcription Giannis Chrysomallis), on November 14, 1954 in Kalamata, Greece) is a self-taught pianist, keyboardist, and composer. After receiving a BA in psychology, he would instead seek a life in music though he had no formal training and could not read a note. He earned Grammy nominations for his 1992 album, Dare to Dream, and the 1993 follow-up, In My Time. His breakthrough success came with the 1994 release of Yanni Live at the Acropolis, deemed to be the second best-selling music video of all time. Yanni has since performed live in concert before in excess of two million people in more than 20 countries around the world. He has accumulated more than 35 platinum and gold albums globally, with sales totaling over 20 million copies. Yanni is considered to be one of the top fundraisers of all time for public television. His compositions have been included in all Olympic Games television broadcasts since 1988, and his music has been used extensively in television and televised sporting events. His music is frequently described as ...
Uchida conducts Mozart's Piano Concerto #20 - Allegro I
Uchida conducts Mozart's Piano Concerto #20 - Allegro I Mitsuko Uchida conducts and performs. Below is a review, reprinted in the DVD insert for this performance. Two and a half centuries after Mozart's birth, Mitsuko Uchida comes as close as any pianist, of the present or the past, to giving his music a quality of contemporaneity, without recourse to exaggeration of any kind, without a hint of "historicity." There is no pedantry in her playing, no self-conscious didacticism, no straight imitation of 18th century practices. She is, however, musicologically highly informed, and characteristically complements this knowledge with practical experience. (cont. on part II)
Magical Concluding Musical Performance by Yanni in a Live Concert Be
Magical Concluding Musical Performance by Yanni in a Live Concert Be violin and Piano hq hd Yanni Samvel Yervinyan (Violin) Sayaka Katsuki (violin) Alexander Zhiroff (Cello) classical music violin piano orchestra symphony Alexander Zhiroff (Russia) cello Samvel Yervinyan (Armenia) violin Sayaka Katsuki (Japan) violin Yanni (born Yiannis Hrysomallis (pronounced Chrysomallis), (Greek: Γιάννης Χρυσομάλλης, classical transcription Giannis Chrysomallis), on November 14, 1954 in Kalamata, Greece) is a self-taught pianist, keyboardist, and composer. After receiving a BA in psychology, he would instead seek a life in music though he had no formal training and could not read a note. He earned Grammy nominations for his 1992 album, Dare to Dream, and the 1993 follow-up, In My Time. His breakthrough success came with the 1994 release of Yanni Live at the Acropolis, deemed to be the second best-selling music video of all time. Yanni has since performed live in concert before in excess of two million people in more than 20 countries around the world. He has accumulated more than 35 platinum and gold albums globally, with sales totaling over 20 million copies. Yanni is considered to be one of the top fundraisers of all time for public television. His compositions have been included in all Olympic Games television broadcasts since 1988, and his music has been used extensively in television and televised sporting events. His music is frequently described as "new age", though he prefers the term "contemporary instrumental". The regents of the University of ...
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