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Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Cecilia Bartoli
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Cecilia Bartoli Not one compilation of Rossini's musical output would be complete without his first "hit tune": "Di tanti palpiti", the moderato section (a cabaletta of sorts) from the cavatina of Tancredi. In his biography of the Maestro, Stendhal wrote that the aria of Tancredi, known throughout Europe, was the most popular opera aria of its time... And also refered to as the "rice aria" because Rossini is supposed to have composed it while waiting for his risotto to cook one day in Venice (imagine: a hungry composer composing such a little masterpiece out of boredom :) )! The cavatina deals with Tancredi's return from exile Tancredi to defend his homeland against the Saracene besiegers (and to see Amenaide, of course). Although many recordings of the aria usually give us only the moderato, Tancredi's cavatina is actually a whole scene: an interlude (depicting Tancredi's boat dropping anchor in a port) - an impassioned recitative - a short (and rather boring) aria - a "cabaletta". It's also interesting to point out that the aria is quite "unrossinian" in character, it almost seems to come from another musical period: the moderato section could be attributed to any composer from the end of the 18th century. I decided to post only the "Di tanti palpiti" section for a number of reasons, chief amongst them being the fact that it is really the best part of Tancredi's cavatina. It's almost a suprise when it appears after the rather uninspired cantabile. I once had about ten versions of this ...
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Ewa Podles, Ves
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Ewa Podles, Ves Not one compilation of Rossini's musical output would be complete without his first "hit tune": "Di tanti palpiti", the moderato section (a cabaletta of sorts) from the cavatina of Tancredi. In his biography of the Maestro, Stendhal wrote that the aria of Tancredi, known throughout Europe, was the most popular opera aria of its time... And also refered to as the "rice aria" because Rossini is supposed to have composed it while waiting for his risotto to cook one day in Venice (imagine: a hungry composer composing such a little masterpiece out of boredom :) )! The cavatina deals with Tancredi's return from exile Tancredi to defend his homeland against the Saracene besiegers (and to see Amenaide, of course). Although many recordings of the aria usually give us only the moderato, Tancredi's cavatina is actually a whole scene: an interlude (depicting Tancredi's boat dropping anchor in a port) - an impassioned recitative - a short (and rather boring) aria - a "cabaletta". It's also interesting to point out that the aria is quite "unrossinian" in character, it almost seems to come from another musical period: the moderato section could be attributed to any composer from the end of the 18th century. I decided to post only the "Di tanti palpiti" section for a number of reasons, chief amongst them being the fact that it is really the best part of Tancredi's cavatina. It's almost a suprise when it appears after the rather uninspired cantabile. I once had about ten versions of this ...
Ezio Pinza(Italian-American bass) Gounod: Faust "Le Veau d'or" 19
Ezio Pinza(Italian-American bass) Gounod: Faust "Le Veau d'or" 19 Vinyl. Ezio Pinza(Italian-American bass) *Vinyl Gounod: Faust "Le Veau d'or" 1929 Gounod: Faust 'Le Veaui d'or' 1929 Ezio Pinza Italian-American bass, 1892 - 1957 an operbathosa video Ezio Pinza Part 2: Shortly before his death, Pinza completed his memoirs, which were published in 1958 by Rinehart & Co., Inc. Photos of his career, as well as images of his family, were included in the book.[2] Pinza died at the age of 64 in Stamford, Connecticut. His funeral was held at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City. He is interred at Putnam Cemetery, in Greenwich, Connecticut. Being devoid of academic training, Pinza was unable to sight-read a musical score. He would listen, however, to his part being played on the piano, and having heard it, could then sing it accurately, such was the precision of his ear. With regard to the lineage of great basses produced by Italy, Pinza succeeded Francesco Navarini and Vitorrio Arimondi, both of whom had international careers and were at their vocal peak prior to World War I. (He also succeeded the Spaniard Jose Mardones, who had appeared regularly in the Italian operatic repertory in America, with the Boston and Met companies, between 1909 and 1926.) Tancredi Pasero, whose voice sounded remarkably similar to Pinza's but who was the possessor of a less magnetic personality, was his chief contemporary rival among Italian-born basses. Pinza appeared in several films, beginning with 1947's Carnegie Hall. This film featured a ...
Gioachino Rossini - Mose in Egitto - "Ah! Se puoi cosi lasciarmi"
Gioachino Rossini - Mose in Egitto - "Ah! Se puoi cosi lasciarmi" The series of musical excepts from Giachino Rossini's operas, entitled "Master of Belcanto", continues with new uploads and a whole new concept. I decided to do something a bit different for my new upload: a compilation based on a single theme which is featured prominently in all selections. The first theme is love (what else :)?). The compilation is entitled: "Tornami a dir che m'ami". Originally, I had planned a more diverse program which would have included arias as well as duets. But when I saw the size of the content I wanted to upload (the remaining compilation is about two hours long), I decided to do love arias as a separate series. The chosen items include love scenes from the very first to the very last operas by Rossini. We start at "L'occasione fa il ladro" with a simple pastoral duet and finish at the beginning of the second act of "Guillaume Tell" with a romantic grand scena. Such an approach gives us a chance to understand how Rossini's composing style changed with each passing year. The presented excepts are listed below with some notes detailing their characteristics. As the whole compilation is quite large, I'm going to upload everything slowly. 1) «Se non m'inganna il core» for Alberto and Berenice from «L'occasione fa il ladro». www.youtube.com 2) «Quanto e dolce a un'alma amante» for Florville and Sofia from "Il Signor Bruschino". www.youtube.com 3) "L'aura che intorno spiri" for Amenaide and Tancredi from "Tancredi". www.youtube.com 4) "Credete alle ...
Gioachino Rossini - L'italiana in Algeri - Ouverture (Marriner)
Gioachino Rossini - L'italiana in Algeri - Ouverture (Marriner) The year 1813 proved a productive one for Rossini, with several important works: "Il signor ", "Tancredi", "Aureliano in Palmira"... In between came an opera that nearly didn't happen. Carlo Coccia, who had accepted a commission to compose an opera for the Teatro San Benedetto in Venice, apparently ran into difficulty in completing his assignment. Rossini accepted the offer from the theater's impresario and wrote "L'italiana in Algeri" in less than a month. Given the tight schedule, the composer turned to a libretto already in existence, one by Angelo Anelli, already set by Luigi Mosca (Meyerbeer1's channel includes a version of the duet between Isabella and Taddeo by Mosca, do check it out). Although Rossini was likely familiar with Mosca's opera, significant additions and changes were made to the libretto. The 21-year-old composer elected to go for broke with the effects of his ensemble writing. The opera was premiered on May 22, 1813, to applause that, according to one critic, "thundered without pause". "L'italiana" was the first of several important Rossini comic operas to hold prominent roles for lower female voices, the third, to be precise. The protagonist is a determined Italian lady, sung by contralto, who travels to Algiers to search for her lover, Lindoro, kidnapped and held as a slave by Mustafa, the Bey of Algiers. Isabella's wit and charm prove too much for Mustafa and his retinue, and she is able to escape with Lindoro at the end, leaving the Bey fuming ...
Gioachino Rossini - Il turco in Italia - Ouverture (Neville Marriner
Gioachino Rossini - Il turco in Italia - Ouverture (Neville Marriner I am returning, after quite a bit of time, to my comedic collection with excepts from one of Rossini's most "Shakespearean" comedies, "Il turco in Italia". "Il turco" was commissioned by the famed La Scala for the autumn season of 1814. Although only 22 at the time of composition, Gioachino Rossini had already reached great esteem as an operatic composer (having scored hits with several opere buffe as well as grander, more serious works, such as "Tancredi"), and the success of his "L'italiana in Algeri" the year before spurred him to write a companion piece. Although the two cannot be considered sequels in the literal sense, the similarities are obvious: in "L'italiana", amorous intrigues surround an Italian woman stranded in Algiers, while in "Il turco", a Turk arrives in Italy only to add himself to an existing love triangle (making a love quadrangle, perhaps?). Unfortunately for Rossini, the Milanese public was all too aware of these similarities and, although Rossini's score was every bit as fresh and inventive and his characterizations as well-drawn as those for "L'italiana", they heartily disapproved. However, the quality of the score would eventually carry the day and, as Stendhal wrote in his biography of Rossini, the opera was revived just four years later to wild enthusiasm. In short, the opera involves the Pirandello-like theme of an author in search of six characters: here, the capricious married woman, Fiorilla (soprano); her buffoonish but sincere husband ...
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