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Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II
Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II Egyptian March - Johann Strauss II
"Bolero" by Maurice Ravel
"Bolero" by Maurice Ravel Ravel's "Bolero" played to scenes of ancient Egypt. A construction management study carried out by the firm Daniel, Mann, Johnson, & Mendenhall in association with Mark Lehner and other Egyptologists, estimates that the total project required an average workforce of 14567 people and a peak workforce of 40000. Without the use of pulleys, wheels, or iron tools, they surmise the Great Pyramid was completed from start to finish in approximately 10 years. Their critical path analysis study reveals estimates that the number of blocks used in construction was between 2-2.8 million (an average of 2.4 million), but settles on a reduced finished total of 2 million after subtracting the estimated area of the hollow spaces of the chambers and galleries. Most sources agree on this number of blocks somewhere above 2.3 million. The Egyptologists' calculations suggest the workforce could have sustained a rate of 180 blocks per hour (3 blocks/minute) with ten hour work days for putting each individual block in place. They derived these estimates from construction projects that did not use modern machinery. This study fails to take into account however, especially when compared to modern third world construction projects, the logistics and craftsmanship time inherent in constructing a building of nearly unparalleled magnitude with such precision, or among other things, the use of up to 60-80 ton stones being quarried and transported a distance of over 500 miles. Average core blocks of the ...
Ibrahim Tatlıses - Turkish Pavarotti - En Tiz Uzun Havası
Ibrahim Tatlıses - Turkish Pavarotti - En Tiz Uzun Havası ibo show ibrahim İBRAHİM TATLISES ıbrahim uğur karakuş haktan urfa classical music video ıtalia opera ısrael ıtaly tenor soprano pavarotti carreras egypt amza sıra gecesi star tv haktan ünsal arap arab ümmü gülsüm ummu michael paris bekçi bakır tenekeci mahmut hafız burhan makber arapça arapca violin keman sendur baki murat sakaryalı turkey akatay taksim music musıc müzik bach beethoven mozart haydn markov istanbul ıstanbul aziza azıza mustafa zadeh yanni yannı greece grece atina lubnan lübnan ıraq mısır evlerinin önü boyalı direk tangos azeri azarbeycan azerbeycan ابراهيم تاتليسيس sezen aksu tarkan teoman şebo sebo şebnem ferah agsl nessun dorma ابراهيم تاتليسيس
(IX) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratoriu
(IX) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratoriu Franz Joseph Haydn (1732~1809) 《The Creation》oratorio, Hob. XXI:2 (1798) - English version, Vienna 1800 - (Part 2, Scene 2 / The Sixth Day) 26c. Chorus - "Achieved is the glorious work, Our song let be the praise of God!" (Part 3, Scene 1) 27. Recitative - "In rosy mantle appears" (Part 3, Scene 2) 28a. Duet with Chorus - "By thee with bliss, O bounteous Lord" Michael George (bass / Raphae & Adam) Emma Kirkby (soprano / Gabriel & Hawwah) Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor / Uriel) Choir of New College, Oxford The Chorus of Academy of Ancient Music The Academy of Ancient Music Christopher Hogwood (conductor) The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn (H. 21/2), and considered by many to be his masterpiece. The oratorio depicts and celebrates the creation of the world as described in the biblical Book of Genesis and in Paradise Lost. Haydn was inspired to write a large oratorio during his visits to England in 1791-1792 and 1794-1795, when he heard oratorios of Handel performed by large forces. Israel in Egypt is believed to have been one of these. It is likely that Haydn wanted to try to achieve results of comparable weight, using the musical language of the mature classical style. The work on the oratorio lasted from October 1796 to April 1798. It was also a profound act of faith for this deeply religious man, who appended the words "Praise to God" at the end of every completed composition. He later remarked, "I was never ...
(IV) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratoriu
(IV) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratoriu Franz Joseph Haydn (1732~1809) 《The Creation》oratorio, Hob. XXI:2 (1798) - English version, Vienna 1800 - (Part 1, Scene 3 / The Third Day) 10. Recitative - "And the heavenly host proclaimed the third day, praising God, and saying" 11. Chorus - "Awake the harp, the lyre awake!" (Part 1, Scene 4 / The Fourth Day) 12. Recitative - And God said: 'Let there be lights in the firmament of heaven" 13. Recitative - "In splendour bright is rising now the sun and darts his rays" 14. Chorus with Trio - "The heavens are telling the Glory of God" Emma Kirkby (soprano / Gabriel) Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor / Uriel) Michael George (bass / Raphael) Choir of New College, Oxford The Chorus of Academy of Ancient Music The Academy of Ancient Music Christopher Hogwood (conductor) The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn (H. 21/2), and considered by many to be his masterpiece. The oratorio depicts and celebrates the creation of the world as described in the biblical Book of Genesis and in Paradise Lost. Haydn was inspired to write a large oratorio during his visits to England in 1791-1792 and 1794-1795, when he heard oratorios of Handel performed by large forces. Israel in Egypt is believed to have been one of these. It is likely that Haydn wanted to try to achieve results of comparable weight, using the musical language of the mature classical style. The work on the oratorio lasted from October 1796 to April 1798. It was also a ...
(II) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratoriu
(II) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratoriu Franz Joseph Haydn (1732~1809) 《The Creation》oratorio, Hob. XXI:2 (1798) - English version, Vienna 1800 - (Part 1, Scene 1 / The First Day) 2a. Recitative - "In the beginning God" 2b. Chorus - "And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters" 2c. Recitative - "And God saw the light, that it was good" 3a. Aria - "Now vanish before the holy beams" 3b. Chorus with Solo - "Despairing, cursing rage" (Part 1, Scene 2 / The Second Day) 4. Recitative - "And God made the firmament" 5. Solo with Chorus - "The marvellous work beholds amazed" Emma Kirkby (soprano / Gabriel) Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor / Uriel) Michael George (bass / Raphael) Choir of New College, Oxford The Chorus of Academy of Ancient Music The Academy of Ancient Music Christopher Hogwood (conductor) The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn (H. 21/2), and considered by many to be his masterpiece. The oratorio depicts and celebrates the creation of the world as described in the biblical Book of Genesis and in Paradise Lost. Haydn was inspired to write a large oratorio during his visits to England in 1791-1792 and 1794-1795, when he heard oratorios of Handel performed by large forces. Israel in Egypt is believed to have been one of these. It is likely that Haydn wanted to try to achieve results of comparable weight, using the musical language of the mature classical style. The work on the oratorio lasted from October 1796 to April 1798. It was also a ...
Gioachino Rossini - Mose in Egitto - "Involto in fiamma" (June And
Gioachino Rossini - Mose in Egitto - "Involto in fiamma" (June And Well, it seems we have progressively moved from cavatinas to terzets, so I decided to post a quartet from "Mose in Egitto" as the next piece. "Mose in Egitto" is one of Rossini's most exciting scores. It basically belongs to the genre of staged oratorio cultivated in Italy in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries for performance during Lent (Donizetti's "Il diluvio universale" follows the tradition). Essentially a three-act opera seria on a biblical subject, it tells the story of the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt under the leadership of Moses and includes three of the ten plagues suffered by the Egyptians because of Pharaoh's refusal to liberate the Israelites. But the center of the story is occupied by a love affair between the Pharaoh's son (Osiride) and an Israelite girl (Elcia); Osiride, not wishing to lose Elcia (who has become his wife), incites Pharaoh's obstinacy, which leads to Osiride's death (as part of the final plague, the slaying of the first-born). Much like "La donna del lago", the opera opens without an overture: three octave C's in the orchestra are followed by the plague of darkness. Each act centers on a long ensemble: the reaction to the return of light; the reaction to the discovery of the love between Elcia and Osiride (the presented piece), and the hymn of praise by the Israelites just before they cross through the Red Sea (the rightly famous "Dal tuo stellato soglio"). But the opera also features other superb pieces: a duet for Elcia ...
(I) FJ Haydn - Overture〈The Creation〉/ Die Schöpfung, Oratorium
(I) FJ Haydn - Overture〈The Creation〉/ Die Schöpfung, Oratorium Franz Joseph Haydn (1732~1809) 《The Creation》oratorio, Hob. XXI:2 (1798) - English version, Vienna 1800 - (Part 1 / The First Day) 1. Overture (Introduction) - The Representation of Chaos Emma Kirkby (soprano / Gabriel) Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor / Uriel) Michael George (bass / Raphael) Choir of New College, Oxford The Chorus of Academy of Ancient Music The Academy of Ancient Music Christopher Hogwood (conductor) The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn (H. 21/2), and considered by many to be his masterpiece. The oratorio depicts and celebrates the creation of the world as described in the biblical Book of Genesis and in Paradise Lost. Haydn was inspired to write a large oratorio during his visits to England in 1791-1792 and 1794-1795, when he heard oratorios of Handel performed by large forces. Israel in Egypt is believed to have been one of these. It is likely that Haydn wanted to try to achieve results of comparable weight, using the musical language of the mature classical style. The work on the oratorio lasted from October 1796 to April 1798. It was also a profound act of faith for this deeply religious man, who appended the words "Praise to God" at the end of every completed composition. He later remarked, "I was never so devout as when I was at work on The Creation; I fell on my knees each day and begged God to give me the strength to finish the work." Haydn composed much of the work while at his ...
(III) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratori
(III) FJ Haydn -〈The Creation〉Oratorio / Die Schöpfung, Oratori Franz Joseph Haydn (1732~1809) 《The Creation》oratorio, Hob. XXI:2 (1798) - English version, Vienna 1800 - (Part 1, Scene 3 / The Third Day) 6. Recitative - And God said: "Let the waters under the heaven be gathered" 7. Aria - "Rolling in foaming billows" 8. Recitative - And God said: "Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb" 9. Aria - "With verdure clad the fields appear" Emma Kirkby (soprano / Gabriel) Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor / Uriel) Michael George (bass / Raphael) Choir of New College, Oxford The Chorus of Academy of Ancient Music The Academy of Ancient Music Christopher Hogwood (conductor) The Creation (German: Die Schöpfung) is an oratorio written between 1796 and 1798 by Joseph Haydn (H. 21/2), and considered by many to be his masterpiece. The oratorio depicts and celebrates the creation of the world as described in the biblical Book of Genesis and in Paradise Lost. Haydn was inspired to write a large oratorio during his visits to England in 1791-1792 and 1794-1795, when he heard oratorios of Handel performed by large forces. Israel in Egypt is believed to have been one of these. It is likely that Haydn wanted to try to achieve results of comparable weight, using the musical language of the mature classical style. The work on the oratorio lasted from October 1796 to April 1798. It was also a profound act of faith for this deeply religious man, who appended the words "Praise to God" at the end of every completed composition. He later remarked, "I was never ...
Amapola Andrea Giuffredi trumpet
Amapola Andrea Giuffredi trumpet Amapola Andrea Giuffredi trumpet "Amapola" is a popular song, written by Spanish composer Joseph LaCalle with Spanish lyrics although the English language lyrics were written by Albert Gamse. Andrea Giuffredi, has collaborated for over 25 years as principal trumpet with the following Italian orchestras: "Orchestre RAI" Turin and Milan, "Teatro Comunale" Firenze, "Teatro Regio" Parma, "Teatro alla Scala" in Milan, "Orchestra sinfonica Arturo Toscanini dell'Emilia Romagna". He has played with several famous Conductors such as Muti, Prêtre, Sawallisch, Sinopoli, Cuhng and many others, playing in the most important concert halls of the world from Japan to Turkey, from Germany to France, Italy, United States, Iraq, Tunisia, Egypt, France, Finland, Spain, Malta, Mexico, Albania, China. Since '90 to '96 he played as a soloist with famous chamber orchestra "I Solisti Veneti " conductor Claudio Scimone. .He has held trumpet master classes and recitals in different parts of the world : USA, Greece, Italy, Spain, Germany, Finland and China . He has also played as soloist in the ITG conference 2004 (USA). As lead trumpet he has played in television shows with the most important Italian and foreigners pop singers among these George Michael and Liza Minnelli, Pavarotti,etc. etc. As soloist he has played accompained by symphonic orchestra "A. Toscanini" (Parma), by RTSH Tirana Radio TV, by "I Solisti Veneti" , "Orchestra Sinfonica Siciliana" , "Krasnoyarsk Sympony Orchestra and "I ...
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