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Astor Piazzolla - Fuga y Misterio
Astor Piazzolla - Fuga y Misterio Astor Piazzolla's Fuga y Misterio, performed at Istanbul Technical University, on May 18th, 2005 by Violin-Aida Boydağ, Viola-Deniz Doğançay, Violoncello-Arzu Gök, Piano-Jerfi Aji, Percussion-Şirin Özgün, Voice-Burcu Yıldız, Classical Guitar-Tolgahan Çoğulu. Astor Piazzolla'nın Fuga y Misterio adlı eseri, 18 Mayis 2005 tarihinde İstanbul Teknik Üniversitesi'nde çalınıyor. www.tolgahancogulu.com
Ana's 1st year Master's Recital (Part 4 of 5)
Ana's 1st year Master's Recital (Part 4 of 5) ~ Ana Luisa Santo, soprano assisted by Mélisande Sinsoulier, piano March 31, 2010 York University Department of Music from Le Varie Musiche: O miei giorni fugaci Jacopo Peri Lungi dal vostro lume (1561-1633) Jacopo Peri (1561 1633) is often called the inventor of opera and his Dafne and Euridice are today considered the first operas. He and his associate Jacopo Corsi (the leading patron of music in France) felt that the music of the day was inferior to classical Greek and Roman art and attempted to recreate music they felt approximated this ancient music. They collaborated with the well-known poet of the time, Ottavio Rinuccini, and thus created a new work, Dafne, that we today call the first opera. (This music was probably far from anything truly resembling the uknown music of ancient Greece). Unfortunately, Dafne did not survive, but Peri and Rinuccinis next collaboration, Euridice, did. Euridice made use of a new technique called recitative, a style of speech-singing that helped moved the action along as it placed the focus on getting a lot of text out in a short amount of time. (Rinuccini was also the librettist for Claudio Monteverdis LArianna, of which only one aria, Ariannas Lament, survives.) Less well known are Peris pieces for solo, two, or three voices. In 1609 he published a collection of these titled Le Varie Musiche, and it is from here that the two songs in this performance are taken. Peri was himself a singer, and it was often said that his voice could ...
Simon Dinnigan - Fugue-Suite BWV 1001, JS Bach
Simon Dinnigan - Fugue-Suite BWV 1001, JS Bach Fuga da Suite BWV 1001 de JS Bach na interpretação de Simon Dinnigan (DVD Simon Dinnigan Guitar Artistry)
Avison - Concerto Grosso in G Major Op. 4 No. 6
Avison - Concerto Grosso in G Major Op. 4 No. 6 CHARLES AVISON (1709 - 1770) Concerto Grosso for two violins, cello, strings and basso continuo in G major Op. 4 No. 6 1. Adagio - Tempo giusto 2. Fuga da capella - Allegro moderato - Adagio 3. Fuga del teatro - Allegro spiritoso 4. Largo 5. Affetuoso 6. Aria pastorale - Andante Performed by the Avison Ensemble Directed by Pavlo Beznosiuk *Charles Avison was an English composer during the Baroque and Classical periods. He was a church organist at St John The Baptist Church[1] in Newcastle and at St. Nicholas's Church (later Cathedral). He is best remembered for his 12 Concerti Grossi after Scarlatti and his Essay on Musical Expression, the first music criticism published in English. Little is known of Avison's early life. The son of Richard and Anne Avison, both musicians, he was baptised on 16 February 1709, at St. John's Church in Newcastle. (According to the New Grove dictionary, he was also born in this city.) It is likely that he had early contact with Ralph Jenison, a patron of the arts, and later a member of Parliament. As a young man, he traveled to London to study under Geminiani. However, his ties to his hometown remained strong, and on 13 October 1735, he was accepted the position of church organist at St. John's Church in Newcastle. Shortly after, he also became organist at nearby St. Nicholas's. Despite numerous offers of more prestigious positions later in life, he never again left Newcastle. On 15 January 1737, Avison married Catherine Reynolds. They had ...
Vivaldi - Concerto for 2 Violins & Cello RV565 - Mov. 1-3/5
Vivaldi - Concerto for 2 Violins & Cello RV565 - Mov. 1-3/5 ANTONIO VIVALDI (1678-1741) Concerto for two violins, cello, strings and continuo in D minor "L'estro Armonico" Op. 3 No. 11 RV565 1. Allegro 2. Adagio e spiccato 3. Allegro [Fuga] Performed by Tafelmusik Featuring Jeanne Lamon, violin Julia Wedman, violin Christina Mahler, cello Conducted by Jeanne Lamon
Sonata No. 1 in G minor for Solo Violin - BWV 1001 - J.S. Bach
Sonata No. 1 in G minor for Solo Violin - BWV 1001 - J.S. Bach Audio only - 1947 David Oistrach recording of Bach's Violin Sonata No. 1 in G minor. I. Adagio, II. Fuga (Allegro), III. Siciliana, IV. Presto.
Mozart Symphony 41 K 551 - Molto Allegro
Mozart Symphony 41 K 551 - Molto Allegro Woody Allen once said that Mozart's Symphony 41 proved the existence of God. Certainly, a symphony of such grandness and scale had, until the summer of 1788, never before been seen in the musical universe. Its implications for the direction of music in the future, and its influence on future composers is immeasurable. What makes Mozart's Jupiter symphony worthy to share the name of the most powerful god of the Roman world? The answer to this question comes in the Molto Allegro, and more specifically in its coda, (8:09-8:36). In the coda, Mozart takes the five musical themes or melodies that had been developed throughout the final movement, and does something that no one has ever achieved to the extent that he did, not even the illustrious Beethoven. What Mozart does is take these five themes and combines them to create a fugato in five-part counterpoint. That is, he takes the five melodies and simultaneously plays them in a variety of combinations and permutations. Imagine five separate melodies, all with their own notes, being played simultaneously, but each constantly changing. It's impossible for the human ear to focus on the enormous amount of notes that this simultaneous playing and constant changing entails. The effect is that the music seems to encompass an infinite amount of sound. With lesser two or three-part fugues, it is occasionally possible to sense everything that is going on. Once you get to four voices, it's nearly impossible to detect all of the nuances.
Toccata and Fugue in D minor - BWV 565 - J.S. Bach
Toccata and Fugue in D minor - BWV 565 - J.S. Bach Toccata and Fugue in D minor by J.S. Bach played on musical glasses by Robert Tiso.
Toccata and Fugue in D minor by J.S. Bach - BWV 565
Toccata and Fugue in D minor by J.S. Bach - BWV 565 Toccata and Fugue in D minor, played by Robert Tiso on glass harp, or musical glasses.
Toccata and Fugue in D minor - BWV 565 - J.S. Bach
Toccata and Fugue in D minor - BWV 565 - J.S. Bach Pavel Svoboda performs Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor. Pavel is a young Czech organist. .
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