Composers

1-10 of 49 results for milan

John Williams - Luis Milan - Pavane #3 (1975)
John Williams - Luis Milan - Pavane #3 (1975) John Williams plays Pavane #3 by Luis Milan, on solo classical guitar. From a 1975 TV series about Spanish guitar music with Williams. This episode also featured Paco Pena.
William Bajzek plays a Ricercare by Da Milano on Classical Guitar
William Bajzek plays a Ricercare by Da Milano on Classical Guitar This is a Ricercare by Francesco Canova Da Milano that I found in one of the Royal Conservatory guitar books. I first heard it on Kevin Gallagher's Naxos CD (he's "classicalguitartv" on youtube, check him out) and was happy to discover that I had the music to it. The project: I am making a video every day (when possible) for the rest of April 2011. Here is the process: 1) Choose a piece (or related pieces), preferably something relatively simple and unfamiliar to me. They will very in difficulty but will need to be short enough to not require page turning, and should not have more than a few technical difficulties. 2) Record myself sightreading it. 3) Analyze the result; make note of any difficulties, determine interpretation. 4) Isolate technical issues and practice 5) Refine interpretation 6) Record again and post! The audio will be somewhat close-mic'd (2-3 feet away) and will remain unprocessed. The end result probably won't be perfect, but one thing I have learned from performing is that at some point you just have to let the music out into the world. The sooner and more often, the better. william.bajzek.com williamsguitarblog.blogspot.com Guitar by Robert Garcia of San Jose, CA
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival Smetana Piano Trio - 3rd Mov
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival Smetana Piano Trio - 3rd Mov Susanna Yoko Henkel (violin), Monika Leskovar (cello) and Milana Chernyavska (piano) perform Bedrich Smetana's Piano Trio in G minor op. 15 at the Zagreb International Chamber Music Festival 2007 (October 19th 2007) - http://www.zagreb-festival.com http://www.susanna-yoko-henkel.com Here you can see the third movement: Finale - Presto
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival: Smetana Piano Trio - 3rd mov.
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival: Smetana Piano Trio - 3rd mov. Susanna Yoko Henkel (violin), Monika Leskovar (cello) and Milana Chernyavska (piano) perform Bedrich Smetana's Piano Trio in G minor op. 15 at the Zagreb International Chamber Music Festival 2007 (October 19th 2007) - www.zagreb-festival.com http Here you can see the third movement: Finale - Presto
Maria Callas "Gualtier Maldè!...Caro nome" Rigoletto Verdi
Maria Callas "Gualtier Maldè!...Caro nome" Rigoletto Verdi Maria Callas esegue "Gualtier Maldé!... Caro nome" da "Rigoletto" di Giuseppe Verdi. Teatro alla Scala di Milano, direttore Tullio Serafin. Registrazione del novembre 1955.
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival: Smetana Piano Trio - 1st mov.
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival: Smetana Piano Trio - 1st mov. Susanna Yoko Henkel (violin), Monika Leskovar (cello) and Milana Chernyavska (piano) perform Bedrich Smetana's Piano Trio in G minor op. 15 at the Zagreb International Chamber Music Festival 2007 (October 19th 2007) - www.zagreb-festival.com http Here you can see the first movement: Moderato assai.
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival: Smetana Piano Trio - 2nd mov.
Zagreb Chamber Music Festival: Smetana Piano Trio - 2nd mov. Susanna Yoko Henkel (violin), Monika Leskovar (cello) and Milana Chernyavska (piano) perform Bedrich Smetana's Piano Trio in G minor op. 15 at the Zagreb International Chamber Music Festival 2007 (October 19th 2007) - www.zagreb-festival.com http Here you can see the second movement: Allegro, ma non agitato
Don Pasquale - Fresca uscita di convento
Don Pasquale - Fresca uscita di convento Don Pasquale Don Pasquale: Ferruccio Furlanetto Dottor Malatesta: Lucio Gallo Norina: Nuccia Focile Ernesto: Gregory Kunde Conductor: Riccardo Muti Composed by Gaetano Donizetti. Teatro alla Scala, Milan. 1994.
Musica a due voci by Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi (II)
Musica a due voci by Giovanni Giacomo Gastoldi (II) Untitled instrumental piece from "Il primo libro della musica a due voci di Gio. Giacomo Gastoldi, maestro di Capella nella Chiesa Ducale di S. Barbara in Mantova, e d'altri eccellentiss. Musici de Milano." 1598 Silvia de Maria - viola da gamba, Timea Nagy - recorder Ensemble Aurion Photo by Károly Zsolt Nagy soundcloud.com
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida
Mozart Piano Concerto No 9 First Mvt Mitsuko Uchida Mitsuko Uchida plays piano and Jeffrey Tate conducts the Mozarteum Orchestra in Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9 "Jeunehomme", in E flat major, K. 271. A Saltzburg Festival performance, recorded in the Mozarteum, Saltzburg, 1989 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed this concerto in Salzburg, 1777. Though only 21 years old, he displayed great maturity and originality in what is regarded by many as his first great masterpiece. It was composed for a Mlle. Jeunehomme, of whom very little is known (such as--her first name!). But she must have been a very fine pianist to be able to perform this! The mix of dramatic and intense emotions, some seemingly mad and anguished with parts of joy and happiness suggest (one romantically feels) that Mlle. Jeunehomme must have been quite a handful for the young Mozart. 1. Allegro, in E flat major and common (C) time 2. Andantino, in C minor and 3/4 time 3. Rondo (Presto), in E flat major and 2/2 time Dawn Chan notes: Renowned pianist Alfred Brendel has referred to Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9, known as the Jeunehomme, as a "wonder of the world," going so far as to assert that Mozart "did not surpass this piece in the later piano concertos." update-- thanks to Laemmerhirt, I moved past my old sources and got some new info! Christopher H. Gibbs wrote in 2005: WHAT'S IN A NAME? Countless beloved pieces of so-called classical music have a nickname, often one not given by the composer. Mozart would have no idea what the "Jupiter" Symphony is, Beethoven the "Emperor" Concerto or "Moonlight" Sonata, or Schubert the "Unfinished" Symphony. The names sometimes come from savvy publishers who know they can improve sales, or from impresarios, critics, or performers. The case of the Concerto we hear today is particularly interesting, and only recently explained. Little is known of the genesis or first performance of the E-flat Concerto. Twentieth-century accounts usually stated that Mozart composed it for a French keyboard virtuoso named Mademoiselle Jeunehomme, who visited Salzburg in the winter of 1777. Nothing else was known, not even the woman's first name. Last year, the Viennese musicologist Michael Lorenz, a specialist in the music of Mozart's and Schubert's time and a brilliant archival detective, figured out the mystery. The nickname was coined by the French scholars Théodore de Wyzewa and Georges de Saint-Foix in their classic early-20th-century study of the composer. As Lorenz explains, "Since one of their favorite names for Mozart was 'jeune homme' (young man), they presented this person as 'Mademoiselle Jeunehomme.'" In a September 1778 letter Mozart wrote to his father, he referred to three recent concertos, "one for the jenomy [K. 271], litzau [K. 246], and one in B-flat [K. 238]" that he was selling to a publisher. Leopold later called the first pianist "Madame genomai." (Spellings were often variable and phonetic at the time.) Lorenz has identified her as Victoire Jenamy, born in Strasbourg in 1749 and married to a rich merchant, Joseph Jenamy, in 1768. Victoire was the daughter of the celebrated dancer and choreographer Jean Georges Noverre (1727-1810), who was a good friend of Mozart's. He had choreographed a 1772 Milan production of Mozart's opera Lucio Silla and later commissioned the ballet Les Petits Riens for Paris. Although we still know little about Victoire Jenamy—she does not appear to have been a professional musician, though clearly Mozart admired her playing—Mozart's first great piano concerto can now rightly be called by its proper name: "Jenamy."
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