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Chopin Ballad Number 1 Opus 23 in G Minor by Tzvi Erez
Chopin Ballad Number 1 Opus 23 in G Minor by Tzvi Erez iTunes link itunes.apple.com Chopin Ballad Number 1 Opus 23 in G Minor played by Tzvi Erez on his Vintage 1912 Bosendorfer. Available on the Niv Classical Label. www.nivmusic.com © Videography & Editing - Gershon Srubiski, SVP Productions
Classical Music at 180 MPH (O Fortuna Carmina Burana) Piano/Cello
Classical Music at 180 MPH (O Fortuna Carmina Burana) Piano/Cello Want to become a Piano Guys founder? Click link for all the exciting details www.thepianoguys.com Be first to receive our Limited Edition PianoGuys album! (Youtube hits) here: www.thepianoguys.com Download on iTunes here itunes.apple.com Download on Amazon.com here: www.amazon.com We're on facebook now!! :) www.facebook.com Don't forget to add our Twitter! :) www.twitter.com It was impossible to turn down an invitation from one of our fans (Brad and Andrea Harker) to visit a private race track in the middle of the Nevada desert just outside of Las Vegas. We took our cameras with us and a new tune that we created just for the occasion. Thanks to a number of subscribers for the suggestion to remake this epic classical piece by Carl Orff! It was one of three possibilities we were considering when writing with the race track in mind. In the end it was no contest; especially when we read the English transition of the Latin lyrics in the piece -- which speak of fate like a "wheel" and a "driving force!" Our version of O Fortuna was so much fun to create that it was done in a matter of three days (we couldn't let ourselves do anything else until it was finished). It consists of 6 piano tracks, 43 acoustic cello tracks, 3 percussion tracks, and 48 vocal tracks. A special thanks to Orin Harker (He owns the white car) , along with his wife Val, who hosted us, gave us all the ride of our lives, and taught us about the coolness of Radical Racing! They definitely went the "extra mile ...
Cio-Cio San aria from "Madama Butterfly" Rigina Valieva sings 蝶
Cio-Cio San aria from "Madama Butterfly" Rigina Valieva sings 蝶 www.rigina.info Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini, with an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa. Puccini based his opera in part on the short story "Madame Butterfly" (1898) by John Luther Long, which was dramatized by David Belasco. Puccini also based it on the novel Madame Chrysanthème (1887) by Pierre Loti. According to one scholar, the opera was based on events that actually occurred in Nagasaki in the early 1890s.[1] The original version of the opera, in two acts, had its premiere on February 17, 1904, at La Scala in Milan. It was very poorly received despite the presence of such notable singers as soprano Rosina Storchio, tenor Giovanni Zenatello and baritone Giuseppe De Luca in the lead roles. This was due in large part to the late completion and inadequate time for rehearsals. Puccini revised the opera, splitting the second act into two acts and making other changes. On May 28, 1904, this version was performed in Brescia and was a huge success. The opera is set in the city of Nagasaki. Japan's best-known opera singer Tamaki Miura won international fame for her performances as Cio-Cio San; her statue, along with that of Puccini, can be found in Nagasaki's Glover Garden. Butterfly is a staple of the standard operatic repertoire for companies around the world and it is the most-performed opera in the United States, where it ranks as Number 1 in Opera America's list of the 20 most ...
Claude Debussy (1862-1918): "La cathédrale engloutie"
Claude Debussy (1862-1918): "La cathédrale engloutie" The composer Claude Debussy needs little introduction. As a pianist, he was noted for his avoidance of the crisp, dry and articulated style which typified French pianism of the nineteenth century. His style of playing was simple, highly tone-conscious and completely uncluttered by over-expressive angst. This piece is number ten in the first book of Préludes. The recording is a piano roll recording made by Debussy for Welte in 1913 (just three years after the work was composed). The piano rolls for Welte are amongst the most accurate we have, conveying the original performed dynamics, attack and pedalling rather faithfully, and when a good roll is played on a properly conditioned piano, the problems of dubious rhythmic bumpiness which infect many roll playbacks can vanish. This rendition seems as fine as we could hope for. Debussy makes important changes to the music here, doubling the tempo when bars are notated in 3/2 (the prevailing tempo being 6/4).
Richard Wagner - Götterdämmerung - Der Ring des Nibelungen - act 1
Richard Wagner - Götterdämmerung - Der Ring des Nibelungen - act 1 "Vorspiel - Welch Licht Leuchtet"/"Treu Beratner Verträge Runen". "Götterdämmerung" (The Twilight of the Gods), fourth and last of the four operas of "Der Ring des Nibelungen" (The Ring of the Nibelung). Music and text by Richard Wagner (1813-1883). Conductor: Georg Solti & Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Wagner's essential peculiarity is the representation of the drama as an element of introspection; his operas can't be considered operas in the traditional meaning of the word, but great compositions where music, singing, poetry and psychology merge to interpret the life. In Wagner's conception the drama expect an almost religious attention, which the public has to attend to as the story takes place in his mind; so the drama rises magically from the imagination of the public before being in music. The music of the Cycle is composed by a mosaic of leading motifs, the leitmotiv, which embode characters or feelings, so their continuos reappearing produces a sort of psychological premonition. No closed-form pieces or arias interfer with the free flow of the narration which goes on without solution of continuity from the beginning to the end of every act, subjecting the singing to the comment of an orchestra enormous for the number of instruments and resonant wideness. It is also important in Wagner the use of chromatism, that incessant wave of chromatic spirals which is took to extremes till it leave the tonal structure. The characters of these operas are taken from the old ...
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Cecilia Bartoli
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Cecilia Bartoli Not one compilation of Rossini's musical output would be complete without his first "hit tune": "Di tanti palpiti", the moderato section (a cabaletta of sorts) from the cavatina of Tancredi. In his biography of the Maestro, Stendhal wrote that the aria of Tancredi, known throughout Europe, was the most popular opera aria of its time... And also refered to as the "rice aria" because Rossini is supposed to have composed it while waiting for his risotto to cook one day in Venice (imagine: a hungry composer composing such a little masterpiece out of boredom :) )! The cavatina deals with Tancredi's return from exile Tancredi to defend his homeland against the Saracene besiegers (and to see Amenaide, of course). Although many recordings of the aria usually give us only the moderato, Tancredi's cavatina is actually a whole scene: an interlude (depicting Tancredi's boat dropping anchor in a port) - an impassioned recitative - a short (and rather boring) aria - a "cabaletta". It's also interesting to point out that the aria is quite "unrossinian" in character, it almost seems to come from another musical period: the moderato section could be attributed to any composer from the end of the 18th century. I decided to post only the "Di tanti palpiti" section for a number of reasons, chief amongst them being the fact that it is really the best part of Tancredi's cavatina. It's almost a suprise when it appears after the rather uninspired cantabile. I once had about ten versions of this ...
Francois Boieldieu - La dame blanche - "Viens, gentille dame" (Lau
Francois Boieldieu - La dame blanche - "Viens, gentille dame" (Lau "La dame blanche" was among the most popular French comic operas of the nineteenth century: indeed, it had over 1000 performances at Opera-Comique alone. Although it has since pretty much faded into the annals of operatic history, it actually shows its composer, Boieldieu, and the very genre of the French opera-comique at their best. Georges Brown, the opera's primo tenor, actually has not one but three long solo scenes, one in each of the three acts (he's pretty much in every piece of the opera), and, to be honest, these three numbers are probably the best music in the whole opera (I will try to post the pastoral third scene which is quite inspiring). But the real gem of the opera is Georges' "Viens, gentille dame". The scene is pretty straightforward structurally: a classic "ABA" aria is followed by a short but exciting cabaletta with a repeat of the main "A" theme as a finish to the whole aria. The real "shocker" comes in the fact that the aria, in spite of its sentimental text and gentle melodic line, isn't actually a serious romance: it's a half-humorous call of Georges to the "Lady in White" about whom the villagers were warning him in Act One. There is impatience, anxiety in the text but stronger emotions aren't really present (though they are possible). Anyway, the aria is still one of the most beautiful pieces in the entire French repertory. The piece was recorded successfully by Gedda and Wunderlich, but there is something very special in the way the English ...
Richard Wagner - Die Walküre - Der Ring des Nibelungen - act 1^ par
Richard Wagner - Die Walküre - Der Ring des Nibelungen - act 1^ par "Kühlende labung gab mir der que". "Die Walküre" (The Valkyrie), second of the four operas of "Der Ring des Nibelungen" (The Ring of the Nibelung). Music and text by Richard Wagner (1813-1883). Conductor: Georg Solti & Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra Wagner's essential peculiarity is the representation of the drama as an element of introspection; his operas can't be considered operas in the traditional meaning of the word, but great compositions where music, singing, poetry and psychology merge to interpret the life. In Wagner's conception the drama expect an almost religious attention, which the public has to attend to as the story takes place in his mind; so the drama rises magically from the imagination of the public before being in music. The music of the Cycle is composed by a mosaic of leading motifs, the leitmotiv, which embode characters or feelings, so their continuos reappearing produces a sort of psychological premonition. No closed-form pieces or arias interfer with the free flow of the narration which goes on without solution of continuity from the beginning to the end of every act, subjecting the singing to the comment of an orchestra enormous for the number of instruments and resonant wideness. It is also important in Wagner the use of chromatism, that incessant wave of chromatic spirals which is took to extremes till it leave the tonal structure. The characters of these operas are taken from the old Norse mythology; the principle idea, tipically romantic, is ...
Gioachino Rossini - Concert Aria (1813) - "Alle voci della gloria"
Gioachino Rossini - Concert Aria (1813) - "Alle voci della gloria" This virtuoso scene for bass and orchestra, "Alle voci della gloria", a typical "aria di baule" or "suitcase aria" (meaning arias that singers in the nineteenth century carried around with them, should a need arise to sing a piece of suitable demands; sometimes literally in a suitcase :D), generally supposed to have been written by Rossini in 1813 for Filippo Grimani, a Venetian patron, is something of an enigma in the list of Rossini's works, and has a decidedly troubled modern life. It was considered not so long ago (and interpolated as such) as an insertion aria for the completely-sololess Blansac from one of Rossini first operas, "La scala di seta". But there are several signs that, as Philip Gossett rightly points out in his book on performing belcanto, overturn a possibility of Rossini actually considering such an insertion: first off all, we have the text, worthy of opera seria, speaking of a languishing lover, completely lost in his desire to see his beloved again, though the cabaletta is set in a more hopeful mood; then, there is the rich orchestration which includes instruments - trumpets, trombones and percussion - that are actually absent from the earlier opera itself; the level of virtuosity that is asked throughout also seems alien to the comprimario from the farse; finally, there is a question of musical balance, Blansac does not actually need an aria, as it would destroy the balance of the opera where half of the numbers are already traditionally set as ...
Barcarolle (Offenbach, Contes d'Hoffmann) multitrack by Trudbol, da
Barcarolle (Offenbach, Contes d'Hoffmann) multitrack by Trudbol, da ► Facebook: www.facebook.com ► Twitter: twitter.com Jacques Offenbach's "Barcarolle" from his opera 'Les Contes d'Hoffmann' (The Tales of Hoffmann), performed by: - Andy Costello (piano): www.youtube.com - Danny Fong (tenor 1 / tenor 3): www.youtube.com - Julien Neel (tenor 2 / bass 1 / bass 2) A barcarole (from French, also barcarolle; originally, Italian barcarola, from barca 'boat') is a folk song sung by Venetian gondoliers, or a piece of music composed in that style. In classical music, two of the most famous barcaroles are those by Jacques Offenbach, from his opera The Tales of Hoffmann and Frederic Chopin's Barcarole in F sharp major for solo piano. A barcarole is characterized by a rhythm reminiscent of the gondolier's stroke, almost invariably a moderate tempo 6/8 meter. The Tales of Hoffmann (Les contes d'Hoffmann) is an opera by Jacques Offenbach. The French libretto was written by Jules Barbier, based on short stories by ETA Hoffmann, who is the main protagonist in the opera (as he is in the stories). The most famous number in the opera is the "Barcarolle" (Belle nuit, O nuit d'amour), which is performed in act 2. Curiously, the aria was not written by Offenbach with Les contes d'Hoffmann in mind. He wrote it as the 'Elves' Song' in the opera Die Rheinnixen (Les fées du Rhin), which premiered in Vienna on February 8, 1864. Offenbach died with Les contes d'Hoffmann unfinished. Ernest Guiraud completed the scoring and wrote the recitatives for the premiere. He ...
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