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Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Cecilia Bartoli
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Cecilia Bartoli Not one compilation of Rossini's musical output would be complete without his first "hit tune": "Di tanti palpiti", the moderato section (a cabaletta of sorts) from the cavatina of Tancredi. In his biography of the Maestro, Stendhal wrote that the aria of Tancredi, known throughout Europe, was the most popular opera aria of its time... And also refered to as the "rice aria" because Rossini is supposed to have composed it while waiting for his risotto to cook one day in Venice (imagine: a hungry composer composing such a little masterpiece out of boredom :) )! The cavatina deals with Tancredi's return from exile Tancredi to defend his homeland against the Saracene besiegers (and to see Amenaide, of course). Although many recordings of the aria usually give us only the moderato, Tancredi's cavatina is actually a whole scene: an interlude (depicting Tancredi's boat dropping anchor in a port) - an impassioned recitative - a short (and rather boring) aria - a "cabaletta". It's also interesting to point out that the aria is quite "unrossinian" in character, it almost seems to come from another musical period: the moderato section could be attributed to any composer from the end of the 18th century. I decided to post only the "Di tanti palpiti" section for a number of reasons, chief amongst them being the fact that it is really the best part of Tancredi's cavatina. It's almost a suprise when it appears after the rather uninspired cantabile. I once had about ten versions of this ...
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Ewa Podles, Ves
Gioachino Rossini - Tancredi - "Di tanti palpiti" (Ewa Podles, Ves Not one compilation of Rossini's musical output would be complete without his first "hit tune": "Di tanti palpiti", the moderato section (a cabaletta of sorts) from the cavatina of Tancredi. In his biography of the Maestro, Stendhal wrote that the aria of Tancredi, known throughout Europe, was the most popular opera aria of its time... And also refered to as the "rice aria" because Rossini is supposed to have composed it while waiting for his risotto to cook one day in Venice (imagine: a hungry composer composing such a little masterpiece out of boredom :) )! The cavatina deals with Tancredi's return from exile Tancredi to defend his homeland against the Saracene besiegers (and to see Amenaide, of course). Although many recordings of the aria usually give us only the moderato, Tancredi's cavatina is actually a whole scene: an interlude (depicting Tancredi's boat dropping anchor in a port) - an impassioned recitative - a short (and rather boring) aria - a "cabaletta". It's also interesting to point out that the aria is quite "unrossinian" in character, it almost seems to come from another musical period: the moderato section could be attributed to any composer from the end of the 18th century. I decided to post only the "Di tanti palpiti" section for a number of reasons, chief amongst them being the fact that it is really the best part of Tancredi's cavatina. It's almost a suprise when it appears after the rather uninspired cantabile. I once had about ten versions of this ...
Rukajärven tie
Rukajärven tie MOVIE Olli Saarela: Rukajärven tie (1999) MUSIC Gaetano Donizetti: L'elisir d'amore (1832) Una furtiva lagrima LYRICS Una furtiva lagrima negli occhi suoi spuntò: quelle festose giovani invidiar sembrò. Che più cercando io vo? Che più cercando io vo? M'ama! Sì, m'ama, lo vedo, lo vedo. Un solo instante i palpiti del suo bel cor sentir! I miei sospir, confondere per poco a' suoi sospir! I palpiti, i palpiti sentir, confondere i miei coi suoi sospir. Cielo, si può morir! Di più non chiedo, non chiedo. Ah! Cielo, si può, si puo morir, Di più non chiedo, non chiedo. Si può morir, si può morir d'amor. One tear that falls so furtively from her sweet eyes has just sprung, as if she envied all the youths who laughingly passed her right by. What could I want more than this? She loves me! Yes, she loves me! I see it, I see it. One moment just to hear her heart, beating so close next to mine, to hear my sighs like they were hers, her sighings as if they were mine! Heavens, please take me now: All that I wanted is mine now!
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