Paderewski Concerto A Minor 2nd Mov (Romanza) Wild Rec


Paderewski composed the Piano Concerto in A minor Op.17 in 1888 after he gave his first recital in Paris during March of that year. (This was really his debut as a pianist). He finished scoring it in 1889. Paderewski composed the work in the two small rooms that he had rented in Vienna when he began his studies with Leschetizky in 1884. Having played Saint Saens' C minor concerto in Paris shortly after his debut there, he found the French composer to be "perfectly enthusiastic" about his performance of that composition. That encouraged Paderewski to take the score of his recently completed concerto to Saint Saens in order to seek his opinion of the work. Paderewski was met at the door by a very busy Saint-Saens who siad that he had no time to look at the score or listen to Paderewski play it. However, he relented saying,"Well,you are here,so I suppose I must recieve you." In his memoirs Paderewski says,"He took the score and read it as i played it.He listened very attentively. At the Andante (Romanza)he stopped me saying,'What a delightful Andante! Will you please repeat that?'Finally he said,' There is nothing to be changed. You may play it when ever you like.It will please the people.It is quite ready.You needn't be afraid of it, I assure you.'" Paderewski dedicated the concerto to "My master, Leschetizky." The conductor,Hans Richter who was "among the most eminent and finest interpreters of Wagner,and not only Wagner,but all of classical music," had heard Paderewski play,at Leschetizky's invitation,the concerto at Leschetizky's home. In his memoirs Paderewski relates that Lechetizky "was alive to everything concerning the life of a musical student--and was well aware of the prestige of having Padereski's concerto performed at one of richter's concerts. So also did Leschetizky's student and wife (the second of four) the great pianist Annette Essipova who said "Oh,I must play that concerto. I have been studying it for several weeks and I claim the privilege of being the Godmother of that work." Paderewski continues,"And then Leschetizky took it up and insisted upon it too." Reading between the lines, it is obvious that Paderewski had wanted,at least before reflecting about it,to perform his concerto himself as "it was the mark of the highest distinction for any composition,and for any artist to play at a Richter concert, but Madame Essipoff-Lechetizsky,who was present said,'Oh,I must play etc.'" Later in his memoires Paderewski says,"As a matter of fact,I was glad to have her do it ,because I had not studied the concerto sufficiently for a great public performance. So it was that Madame Essipoff (Essipova) played my concerto for the first time a few days after Richter read the score,and it had an immediate success." Paderewski played the concerto many times thereafter and was giving performances of it through the 1920's. Jesus Maria Sanroma,a student of Cortot and Schnabel,was the first to record the work with Arthur Fiefler and the Boston "Pops" Orchestra in 1939. Paderewski was present during the recording of the concerto. Thirty one years later, Arthur Fiedler again conducted a recording of the work,this time leading the London Symphony Orchestra with Earl Wild as soloist

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