Beethoven Symphony No. 9 - Verdi tuning (part 1)


In a series of concerts, being performed as integral parts of Schiller Institute events, the LaRouche Youth Movement has presented their work on the final chorus of Ludwig van Beethoven's 9th Symphony, set to the text of Friedrich Schiller's Ode an die Freude (Ode to Joy). This achievement by an amateur chorus would have been virtually impossible if not for the rigorous working out of the ideas behind the notes and words, the passion of reliving the experience of creativity, and, last but not least, rehearsing and performing the work in the scientifically correct musical tuning of C=256 Hz, rather than the prevalent, anti-musical and vocally destructive tuning of the Romantic School's A=440 or higher (see below). This studio recording, which we now present to you, should be seen as a demonstration of what a group of passionate young people, most of them without any prior musical education, are able to achieve when the pursuit of happiness and commitment to creating a better future, become greater than the common pessimistic small-mindedness. Take this as an example of what the next generations have the potential to create, if they are given the means to do so. And in that case, this will signify the first steps toward a new Classical Renaissance for Mankind! It should also be mentioned that throughout history, Beethoven's 9th symphony has at times been misused for political purposes. The latest in this series of perversions is Herbert von Karajan's reductionist arrangement, currently used by the European Union as their "alibi" for committing atrocities. For instance, it was played during the signing ceremony of the totally undemocratic Lisbon Treaty, which was rammed through without referendum and is intended to abolish the principle of the sovereign nation-state. In stark contrast to the EU's deliberate elimination of the rich heritage of European cultures, to be replaced by a bureaucratic, uniform prison of soulless directives, rules und norms, our rendition of the 9th Symphony today represents the true spirit of Beethoven's work and the living embodiment of the universal content of Schiller's poem. Today, as in 1989 or in every time of great crisis, this is what a culture-starved population really needs -- freedom! PRESS RELEASE AND DOWNLOADS AVAILABLE HERE (ENGLISH AND GERMAN): http://schillerinstitute.org/music/2010/beethoven_9th_berlin_c256.html http://schiller-institut.de/20100325-beethoven/ - WHY C=256? RETURN TO TRUTH, BEAUTY AND CLASSICAL CULTURE! - The Schiller Institute, which represents these ideas internationally, has become known for its initiative to lower the international standard musical pitch to middle-C=256 cycles per second (corresponding to approximately A=430 to 432), in order to preserve the human voice and to return the performance of Classical music to that of the composers' poetic intentions. The Institute's 1992 publication of A Manual on the Rudiments of Tuning and Registration, Vol. I, Introduction and Human Singing Voice, demonstrates that the natural C=256 tuning is grounded in the physical laws of our universe, and is creating an educated leadership in the music world to restore the pitch to that for which all the great Classical music from Bach through Verdi was written -- known as the "Verdi pitch" -- and to save the human voice. The fact that the level of pitch is no mere professional detail, was underlined by the star-studded list of endorsers of the Schiller Institute's campaign. That list included: Sopranos Montserrat Caballé, Renata Tebaldi, Joan Sutherland, Birgit Nilsson, Anneliese Rothenberger, Grace Bumbry, and Edda Moser; mezzo-sopranos Marilyn Horne and Christa Ludwig; tenors Carlo Bergonzi, Placido Domingo, Luciano Pavarotti, Alfredo Kraus, Peter Schreier, and Giuseppe Di Stefano; baritones Piero Cappuccilli, Sherrill Milnes, Renato Bruson, and Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau; basses Kurt Moll and Ruggero Raimondi; Norbert Brainin, former first violinist of the Amadeus Quartet; and hundreds of others. The Institute's work in this regard has continued to radiate internationally since 1988, affecting virtually every major musical institution and performer worldwide.

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