Gymnopédie vs Take Five (Brubeck & Satie) Jazz\Classical Piano


This is a work in progress. I came up with the idea of mixing Gymnopédie & Take 5 whilst at my friend Johnny's house. I heard him playing 2 of his own compositions simultaneously on the piano, one on his left hand, one on his right. This inspired me to try playing 2 pieces at the same time and 'Gymnopédie vs Take 5' was what came out. You can hear my wonderful new Christmas album at http://www.joolsscott.co.uk or http://www.firesidecarols.co.uk There's piano, cello, guitar, double bass, trumpet, lots of singing, cheer and jollity. "Take Five" is a classic jazz piece first recorded by the Dave Brubeck Quartet and released on its 1959 album Time Out. However, it would not become a hit on the Billboard Hot 100 charts until 1961. Composed by Paul Desmond, the group's saxophonist, it became famous for its distinctive, catchy saxophone melody and use of quintuple time, from which its name is derived. It is also known for the solo by drummer Joe Morello. While Take Five was not the first jazz composition to use this meter, it was the first of United States mainstream significance, becoming a hit on the radio at a time when rock music was in fashion. The song has been recorded by scores of artists, from Swedish singer Monica Zetterlund in 1962 to Colorado jamband String Cheese Incident in 2000, to a dub version by King Tubby in 2002. Some versions have included lyrics, including a 1961 recording with lyrics written by Dave Brubeck and his wife Iola, that was sung by Carmen McRae. After Paul Desmond passed away in 1977, he donated all future royalties of this song to the American Red Cross. Although Paul Desmond is generally regarded as the composer of the song, there is some speculation as to whether or not he did in fact compose it, and not Dave Brubeck. The Gymnopédies, published in Paris starting in 1888, are three piano compositions written by French composer and pianist, Erik Satie. furniture music mood-setting background music. From the second half of the 20th century on, the Gymnopédies were often erroneously described as part of Satie's body of furniture music, perhaps due to John Cage's interpretation of them. In the late 1880s Patrice Contamine, at that time better known as J.P. Contamine de Latour, wrote Les Antiques ("The Ancient"), a poem containing these lines: Oblique et coupant l'ombre un torrent éclatant Ruisselait en flots d'or sur la dalle polie Où les atomes d'ambre au feu se miroitant Mêlaient leur sarabande à la gymnopédie Slanting and shadow-cutting a flickering eddy Trickled in gusts of gold to the shiny flagstone Where the ambre atoms in the fire mirroring themselves Mingled their sarabande to the gymnopaedia Perceptions - Regarding Greek Antiquity, Otfried Müller was esteemed as one of the major authorities for many decades, continuing after his accidental death in 1840. Müller wrote most of his works in German. George Cornewall Lewis was the English translator of Müller's Dorians Gymnopédie also appears as an infrequently used word in 19th century France, to the point it might have been perceived as a neologism by many. Further, in the Contamine poem gymnopédie is used in the singular, while the original Greek word (γυμνοπαιδία - "gumnopaidia") is always plural. Satie gymnopaedist Robin Alciatore hymns by Thalétès Contamine's poetry inspired Erik Satie to the first compositions with which he tried to cut himself loose from the conventional 19th century "salon music" environment of his father and stepmother. In September 1887 Satie composed three "sarabands" (Trois Sarabandes), taking a quote from Contamine's La Perdition by way of introduction. By this time, Satie knew Contamine personally. Satie apparently used the word "gymnopédiste" (gymnopaedist), before having written a note of his later so famous gymnopédies. The anecdote of Satie introducing himself as a "gymnopaedist" in December 1887 runs as follows: the first time Satie visited the Chat Noir cabaret, he was introduced to its director, Rodolphe Salis, famous for serving sharp comments. Being coerced to mention his profession, Satie, lacking any recognisable professional occupation, presented himself as a "gymnopaedist", supposedly in an attempt to outwit the director. Bob Dylan Christmas Album 2009 Christmas in The Heart Best Christmas Album - Christmas Music Online http://www.bestchristmasalbum.co.uk

More Related Videos

Erik Satie Gymnopedie 3 - Francesco Teopini - Classical Guitar

Erik Satie Gymnopedie 3 - Francesco Teopini - Classical Guitar

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1 ( Orchestra )

Erik Satie - Gymnopédie No.1 ( Orchestra )

Café del Mar Classic: Gymnopedie by Erik Satie

Café del Mar Classic: Gymnopedie by Erik Satie

Erik Satie - Gymnopedie No.3 (Orchestrated by Debussy)

Erik Satie - Gymnopedie No.3 (Orchestrated by Debussy)

Erik Satie Gymnopédie No. 1 - Tzvi Erez, piano

Erik Satie Gymnopédie No. 1 - Tzvi Erez, piano

Erik Satie - Gymnopedie No.1 (Orchestrated by Debussy)

Erik Satie - Gymnopedie No.1 (Orchestrated by Debussy)

Erik Satie - Gymnopedie 1 (played on strings)

Erik Satie - Gymnopedie 1 (played on strings)

Satie - 1ère Gymnopédie avec les pieds !

Satie - 1ère Gymnopédie avec les pieds !