Spanish Guitar Flamenco Malaguena !!! Great Guitar by Yannick lebossé


Spanish Guitar Flamenco Malaguena.Great Guitar, Spanish Guitar ! Guitare ! Spain acoustic music.Learn Guitar on our channel.You will see how to videos with many tutorials. There are also blues tunes performed by this great musician.Flamenco videos to be watched too on the Youtube videos that we have uploaded. Here is a playlist for Guitar lessons.#jepousseuncri https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57JtLg098Go&list=PLMASL4g5JcE2jLKKuM63eFrDIC_2J5hDT Learn it https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOfpuzGP9Sg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngYt1vos2RM More Guitar videos on : http://www.youtube.com/Jepousseuncri Please Subscribe if you want to watch more music videos ! More Guitar With Nicolas bannwarth https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0xG5tItT7o https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fCN-cew_xZY You can find a tutorial on this track by clicking on this link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kGbgVy4BhyE Medieval Music https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4UIE-eavjI&feature=youtu.be Guitar Flamenco .Malagueñas is one of the traditional styles of Andalusian music (flamenco), derived from earlier types of fandango from the area of Málaga, classified among the Cantes de Levante. You can also watch Antonio Banderas - La Malagueña (Érase Una Vez En México) Originally a folk-song type, it became a flamenco style in the 19th century. It is not normally used for dance, as it is generally interpreted with no regular rhythmic pattern, as a "cante libre". It has a very rich melody with virtuous flourishes and use of microtones. Its guitar accompaniment is normally played in open position first inversion giving E for the tonic, which can be transposed by using a capo. Origins Malagueñas derive from local variety of the Fandangos, a type of dance that, with different regional variations and even different names, became very popular in great part of Spain in the 18th century. Malagueñas typical of "cante libre", performed at libitum and normally not used for the dance, folkloric fandangos were originally sung and played at a fast speed, with a rhythmic pattern in 6/8, to accompany dance. Some of these primitive fandangos from Málaga, called Verdiales are still performed nowadays at folkloric gatherings by large non-professional groups called "Pandas", which use a high number of guitars, "bandurrias" mandoline, violins, and tambourines. folkloric songs into real flamenco. They slowed it down (although still keeping the eastern fandango rhythm pattern known as "abandolao"), they enriched the melody with flourishes and ornaments and reduced accompanying instruments to a single guitar. In this process, they were probably influenced by other flamenco styles, but modern research also suggests that the influence of Opera, Zarzuela and other classical music styles also played a part in this development[cite this quote]. The oldest malagueña of this type that has been preserved to our days is probably the Jabera[cite this quote] . This was first mentioned by writer Serafin Estébanez Calderón, probably in the 1840s. According to this contemporary witness, this type of malagueña would have been created by an artist known as La Jabera. This early malagueña type still preserved a rhythmic pattern as those of later artists like Juan Breva. Most of the malagueña types were created in the last decades of the 19th century. Singers such as Antonio Chacón, Enrique el Mellizo and guitarists like Ramón Montoya. Málaga folkloric fandangos. Some of the traditional malagueña styles 1. Juan Breva. He recorded three of his malagueña styles personally in the early 20th century. 2. Enrique el Mellizo. It is often said that he derived his malagueña from the preface to the catholic mass. After his influence, the rhythmic pattern of the malagueña guitar accompaniment was lost and it became a "cante libre". Among the interpreters of this style who helped to establish it we may mention El Niño de la Isla, Aurelio Sellé, Manolo Caracol and Pericón de Cádiz. Each of them has added personal touches to the Malagueña, so it is difficult to know which one resembles the original model most. 3. El Canario. He created one style of Malagueña. 4. Antonio Chacón. More Youtube Guitar Videos: Spanish Guitar and Blues with Yannick Lebossé https://youtu.be/oTXa6FFnPI0 https://youtu.be/KC3hJFvQv3A https://youtu.be/2_oXgPnaZOs https://youtu.be/kXo8Y6qz6QA https://youtu.be/TFJPThBuLks https://youtu.be/57JtLg098Go https://youtu.be/AJw-x30L46E https://youtu.be/QsSq6hgB1XQ https://youtu.be/6VkzfVRSS24 https://youtu.be/iJM6sOhjC0g https://youtu.be/jWBc6eLHF0o https://youtu.be/tyrfXzZ-KG4 https://youtu.be/kGbgVy4BhyE https://youtu.be/U1D_q-GjFUE https://youtu.be/thdR68WFyDk https://youtu.be/KF11JAqMUR4 https://youtu.be/ngYt1vos2RM https://youtu.be/3ZduJh_0GHU

More Related Videos

Recuerdos de la Alhambra - Spanish Guitar - Tarrega - johnclarkemusic.com

Recuerdos de la Alhambra - Spanish Guitar - Tarrega - johnclarkemusic.com

Spanish Guitar: Granadina by Carlos Montoya

Spanish Guitar: Granadina by Carlos Montoya

D. Fortea (Фортеа). Andaluza (Андалузия). Spanish guitar V. Sharii (Шарий)

D. Fortea (Фортеа). Andaluza (Андалузия). Spanish guitar V. Sharii (Шарий)

Panaderos Flamencos - My favourite Spanish tune !!!

Panaderos Flamencos - My favourite Spanish tune !!!