Friedrich Gulda & Galina Ulanova - W.A. Mozart Piano Concerto No.26, K537, 2.Larghetto


W.A. Mozart Piano Concerto No.26 in D K537 - 2. Larghetto Friedrich Gulda - Piano & Conducting Galina Ulanova - Ballet Munich Philharmonic Orchestra Yuri Kondratov - Ballet (Etude) Vladimir Preobrazhensky - Ballet (Les sylphides) Paintings - Claude Monet Friedrich Gulda (1930 2000), was Austrian pianist and the son of a teacher. He began learning to play the piano from Felix Pazofsky at the age of 7; in 1942, he entered the Vienna Music Academy, where he studied piano and musical theory under Bruno Seidlhofer and Joseph Marx. After winning first prize at the International Competition in Geneva four years later, in 1946, he began going on concert tours throughout the world. Together with Jörg Demus and Paul Badura-Skoda, Gulda formed what became known as the "Viennese troika". Although most famous for his Beethoven interpretations, Friedrich Gulda also performed the music of J.S. Bach, Mozart, Schubert, Chopin, Debussy and Ravel. From the 1950's on he cultivated an interest in jazz, writing several songs and instrumental pieces himself and combining jazz and classical music in his concerts at times. Gulda wrote a Prelude and Fugue with a theme suggesting swing. Keith Emerson performed it on Emerson, Lake & Palmer's The Return of the Manticore. In addition, Gulda composed Variations on The Doors' Light My Fire. Another version can be found on As You Like It (1970), an album with standards such as 'Round Midnight and What Is This Thing Called Love. In 1982, Gulda teamed up with jazz pianist Chick Corea, who found himself in between the breakup of Return to Forever and the formation of his Elektric Band. Issued on The Meeting (Philips, 1984), Gulda and Corea communicate in lengthy improvisations mixing jazz (Someday My Prince Will Come and the lesser known Miles Davis song Put Your Foot Out) and classical music (Brahms' Wiegenlied). It was this unorthodox practice that, among other things, earned him the nickname "terrorist pianist"; Friedrich Gulda had a strong dislike of authorities like the Vienna Academy, the Beethoven Ring of which he was offered in recognition of his performances but which he refused, and even faked his own death in the late 1990's, cementing his status as the enfant terrible among pianists. Nevertheless, Gulda is widely regarded as one of the most outstanding piano players of the 20th century. Friedrich Gulda died on January 27, 2000 at the age of 69, following a heart failure. Two of his three sons, Paul (with first wife Paola Loew, born October 25, 1961) and Rico (with his second wife Yuko Wakiyama, born April 9, 1968) Gulda, are also accomplished pianists. Galina Sergeyevna Ulánova (1910 1998) was born in Saint Petersburg, Russia and is frequently cited as being one of the greatest 20th Century ballerinas. Her flat in Moscow is designated a national museum, and there are monuments to her in Saint Petersburg and Stockholm.Ulanova studied in Petrograd under Agrippina Vaganova and her own mother, a ballerina of the Imperial Russian Ballet. When she joined the Mariinsky Theatre in 1928, the press found in her "much of Semyonova's style, grace, the same exceptional plasticity and a sort of captivating modesty in her gestures".[1] They say that Konstantin Stanislavsky, fascinated with her acting style, implored her to take part in his stage productions. In 1944, when her fame reached Stalin, he had her transferred to the Bolshoi Theatre, where she would be the prima ballerina assoluta for 16 years. The following year, she danced the title role in the world premiere of Sergei Prokofiev's Cinderella. Ulanova was a great actress as well as dancer, and when she was finally allowed to tour abroad at the age of 46, enraptured British papers wrote that "Galina Ulanova in London knew the greatest triumph of any individual dancer since Anna Pavlova". Having retired from the stage at the age of 50, she coached many generations of the Russian dancers. Ulanova was the only dancer to be awarded Hero of Socialist Labour, and she was also awarded the highest exclusively artistic national title, People's Artist of the USSR.[2] She was awarded the Lenin or Stalin Prizes in 1941, 1946, 1947, 1950, and 1957. The Ulanova's apartament in Moscow located in one of Seven Sisters, Kotelnicheskaya Embankment Building is preserved as a memorial museum now. Monuments to Ulanova were erected in Saint-Petersburg and Stockholm.

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